Catalogue


The year the dream died : revisiting 1968 in America /
Jules Witcover.
imprint
New York, NY : Warner Books, c1997.
description
xiv, 544 p. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0446518492
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
New York, NY : Warner Books, c1997.
isbn
0446518492
catalogue key
1309938
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [529]-532) and index.
A Look Inside
Awards
This item was nominated for the following awards:
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Publishers Weekly on 1997-05-05:
In a deft recycling of his earlier works (among them 85 Days: The Last Campaign of Robert Kennedy), Baltimore Sun political columnist Witcover has us relive the tumultuous year in which the nation came "unglued." Nixon and Agnew vie for the villain's role, although neither would have been significant, contends the author, had LBJ not eroded his Kennedy legacy by escalating American involvement in Vietnam. As faith and trust in government die, so do Martin Luther King Jr. and Robert F. Kennedy, the latter memorably Witcover's hero. In what is viewed as a might-have-been turning point offering the politics of hope, the crowd magic of RFK grows so uncanny that he must touch thousands of outstretched hands from an open car in motorcade marathons. But he is shot on the night of the California primary, Johnson drops from contention and Vice-President Humphrey is nominated during the bloody rioting at the Chicago convention. Witcover claims that three factors kept Nixon ahead on election day‘resentment against "everything people were seeing on television," the failure of Humphrey's ad agency to spend all its TV money and the success of China lobbyist Anna Chennault, Nixon's agent, in stalling LBJ's peace talks with the North Vietnamese in Paris. This backward look is enriched by the 20/20 hindsight of surviving participants, some still prominent in public life. (June) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved
Appeared in Library Journal on 1997-06-15:
Witcover (Mad as Hell, LJ 8/93), a columnist for the Baltimore Sun, was an eyewitness to many of the tumultuous events of 1968. He chronicles here the assassinations of Martin Luther King Jr. and Robert Kennedy, increasing public unrest over America's involvement in the Vietnam War, college campus upheaval, and the chaotic Democratic National Convention in Chicago, concluding it was during this year that America turned its back on the progressive social and political changes that marked the 1960s. These events culminated in the election of Richard Nixon as president, and in the years to follow the country would become increasingly cynical about politics and government. Because he was present at many seminal events of that year, Witcover is able to provide a rich and compelling narrative of the time. Highly recommended.‘Roseanne Castellino, D'Youville Coll. Lib., Buffalo, N.Y. (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Kirkus Reviews, May 1997
Publishers Weekly, May 1997
Booklist, June 1997
Library Journal, June 1997
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Summaries
Main Description
A prominent journalist looks at the most pivotal year in modern American history -- and its irrevocable consequences for today's society. The tumultuous events of 1968 burden America to this day. The assassinations of Robert Kennedy and Martin Luther King, Jr., the Tet Offensive in Vietnam, campus riots, and the election of Richard Nixon led to disappointment, division, and self-doubt that bred distrust of the nation's leaders and institutions. For millions of Americans, the dream that we would at last face up with compassion to our most basic problems at home and abroad was shattered in 1968, and the groundwork was laid for the cynical social and political climate that exists today.
Unpaid Annotation
A prominent journalist looks at the most pivotal year in modern American history -- and its irrevocable consequences for today's society.The tumultuous events of 1968 burden America to this day. The assassinations of Robert Kennedy and Martin Luther King, Jr., the Tet Offensive in Vietnam, campus riots, and the election of Richard Nixon led to disappointment, division, and self-doubt that bred distrust of the nation's leaders and institutions. For millions of Americans, the dream that we would at last face up with compassion to our most basic problems at home and abroad was shattered in 1968, and the groundwork was laid for the cynical social and political climate that exists today.

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