Catalogue


The struggle for mastery in Europe, 1848-1918 /
by A.J.P. Taylor.
imprint
Oxford : Oxford University Press, 1971.
description
xxxvi, 638 p. : maps.
ISBN
0198812701
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
series title
imprint
Oxford : Oxford University Press, 1971.
isbn
0198812701
catalogue key
130148
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [569]-601) and index.
A Look Inside
Reviews
Review Quotes
'it is a classic'Geoffrey Swain, History Today
"It is a classic."--History Today
One of the glories of twentieth-century writing.
'One of the glories of twentieth-century writing.' Observer
'This is Taylor at this most brilliant. In this book he explains, with his usual radical clarity, how the interactions between the great and small powers developed in 1914 into a great European war, which bought Russian to revolution and came to involve the USA, whereupon ' Europe ceased tobe the centre of the world'.' Good Book Guide
'One of the glories of twentieth-century writing.' Observer'it is a classic'Geoffrey Swain, History Today'This is Taylor at this most brilliant. In this book he explains, with his usual radical clarity, how the interactions between the great and small powers developed in 1914 into a great European war, which bought Russian to revolution and came to involve the USA, whereupon ' Europe ceased to be the centre of the world'.' Good Book Guide
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Summaries
Description for Library
A history of the beginnings of modern Europe that culminates in the outbreak of World War I.
Main Description
The system of international repression ended with the fall of Metternich in 1848. The conflicting ideals of international revolution and collective security came into being with Lenin and Wilson in 1918. Nationalism, tempered by the Balance of Power, dominated Europe in the intervening seventyyears. Drawing on a wealth of diplomatic documents, A. J. P. Taylor examines the relations of the Great Powers, when Europe was still the centre of the world. Written in characteristically vigorous prose, this is a challenging and original diplomatic history, that also considers the political and economicforces which made continental war inevitable.
Table of Contents
Introduction: The Great Power of Europe
The Diplomacy of Revolution, 1848
The Diplomacy of Reaction, 1849-50
The End of the Holy Alliance, 1852-34. The Crimean War, 1854-6
The Congress of Paris and its Consequences, 1856-8
The Italian War and the Disruption of the Settlement of Vienna, 1858-61
The Polish Crisis and the End of the Franco-Russian Entente, 1861-3
Bismarck's Wars: The Defeat of Austria, 1864-6
The Isolation of France, 1866-70
The End of French Primacy, 1870-5
The Great Eastern Crisis, 1875-812. Bismarck's Alliances, 1879-82
The Breakdown of 'The Liberal Alliance' and its Consequences, 1882-5
The Triumph of Diplomacy: The Bulgarian Crisis, 1885-7
The Making of the Franco-Russian Alliance, 1888-94
The Abortive Continental League, 1894-7
The Era of 'World Policy', 1897-1902
The Last Years of British Isolation: The Making of the Anglo-French Entente, 1902-5
The Formation of the Triple Entente, 1905-9
The Years of Anglo-German Hostility, 1909-12
The Balkan Wars and After, 1912-14
The Outbreak of the War in Europe, 1914
The Diplomacy of War, 1914-18
Bibliography
Index
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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