Catalogue


East Boston /
Anthony Mitchell Sammarco.
imprint
Charleston, SC : Arcadia, 2004.
description
1 online resource
ISBN
0738534633 (pbk.)
format(s)
Book
More Details
imprint
Charleston, SC : Arcadia, 2004.
isbn
0738534633 (pbk.)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
catalogue key
12769545
 
Electronic reproduction. Alexandria, VA : Alexander Street Press, 2009. (Images of America: a history of American life in images and texts). Available via World Wide Web.
A Look Inside
Summaries
Long Description
Until the nineteenth century East Boston was a rural community, the scene of livestock grazing and firewood-gathering. This neighborhood that would eventually be closely identified with Logan International Airport was once actually five islands connected by marshland and known collectively as Noodle's Island. Connected to the mainland and developed beginning in 1833, East Boston grew into a diverse and vibrant community.
Main Description
Originally called Noodle's Island, East Boston was once comprised of five islands connected by marshland. Today, many people identify East Boston as the location of Logan International Airport, but it is really much more than that. From colonial times through the late twentieth century, the neighborhood of East Boston has experienced significant developments in the fields of city planning, transportation, and urban development. Until the nineteenth century, East Boston was a rural community whose land was used for grazing and firewood. The East Boston Company was incorporated by William Hyslop Sumner in 1833 to plan the residential and commercial growth of this Boston neighborhood. Connecting East Boston to the city were various modes of transportation including ferries, railroads, and an underground streetcar tunnel. In the 1920s, construction of the Boston Airport, later Logan International Airport, was begun.
Unpaid Annotation
Originally called Noodle's Island, East Boston was once comprised of five Islands connected by marshland. Today, many people identify East Boston as the location of Logan International Airport, but it is really much more than that. From colonial times through the late twentieth century, the neighborhood of East Boston has experienced significant developments in the fields of city planning, transportation, and urban development. Until the nineteenth century, East Boston was a rural community whose land was used for grazing and firewood. The East Boston Company was incorporated by William Hyslop Sumner in 1833 to plan the residential and commercial growth of this Boston neighborhood. Connecting East Boston to the city were various modes of transportation including ferries, railroads, and an underground streetcar tunnel. In the 1920's, construction of the Boston Airport, later Logan International Airport, was begun.
Unpaid Annotation
Until the nineteenth century East Boston was a rural community, the scene of livestock grazing and firewood-gathering. This neighborhood that would eventually be closely identified with Logan International Airport was once actually five islands connected by marshland and known collectively as Noodle’s Island. Connected to the mainland and developed beginning in 1833, East Boston grew into a diverse and vibrant community.
Table of Contents
Introductionp. 7
Early East Bostonp. 9
Maverick Square and Jefferies Pointp. 23
Central Squarep. 33
Eagle Hillp. 43
The Ferries and the Railroadp. 51
Churchesp. 59
Schoolsp. 69
Orient Heightsp. 77
Wood Island Park and Logan Airportp. 85
The Clipper Shipsp. 93
The Libraryp. 115
Industriesp. 121
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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