Catalogue


Lawless liberators : political banditry and Cuban independence /
Rosalie Schwartz.
imprint
Durham : Duke University Press, 1989.
description
x, 297 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0822308827 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Durham : Duke University Press, 1989.
isbn
0822308827 (alk. paper)
general note
Includes index.
catalogue key
1270369
 
Bibliography: p. [286]-290.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 1989-12:
Based on the Polavieja Collection in the Archivo General de Indias in Seville and on a meticulous reading of extensive secondary sources, Schwartz has produced an immensely readable, highly textured reconstruction of one of the most dramatic and disruptive phases of Cuban history. Lawless Liberators takes extremely sharp issue not only with Louis Perez's Lords of the Mountain (1989), but also with the application of Eric Hobsbawm's persuasively argued thesis of primitive rebels as it applies to the Cuban situation at the end of the 19th century. Admitting that wars, especially civil wars, create strange political bedfellows, Schwartz provides overwhelmingly full details on the social and economic milieu that promoted both brigandage and political patriotism. Her extremely rich, powerfully vivid descriptions present a graphic picture of changing cultivation and culture, of complicated coalitions across family and class lines, and across rural and urban settings. Noting that Perez's rebels never shared the experiences he described, she vigorously refutes the notion that brigandage demonstrated class warfare, or "a confused and angry prepolitical mass." An excellent book in every way. College, university, and public libraries. -F. W. Knight, Johns Hopkins University
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, December 1989
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Summaries
Main Description
Among the forces that took the field in the 1890s in an attempt to overturn the Spanish colonial regime in Cuba were a large number of rural bandits. The alliance between outlaws and more respectable separatists was not accidental, nor did it prove peripheral to Independence strategies. Thieves, extortioners, kidnappers, and killers who cast their lot with veteran insurgents emerged from and contributed to, a century of social and economic upheaval; the reasons cited by many bandits for their outlawry were the same as those that appeared as complaints in revolutionary manifestos. Ransom and extortion money furnished by bandits also often replenished the bankrupt coffers of the rebellion. Manuel Garcia, a hero-villian of Cuban folklore to this day, was the most notorious of the brigand-patriots and led a gang that spread terror throughout Havana province, contributing to the breakdown of rural order that preceded full-scale rebellion in 1895.Lawless Liberatorsexamines the origins, actions, and ends (often sudden and violent) of the bandit groups such as Garciars"s that paved the way for the revolution and offers a reasoned and balanced analysis of their role in those dramatic events.
Main Description
Among the forces that took the field in the 1890s in an attempt to overturn the Spanish colonial regime in Cuba were a large number of rural bandits. The alliance between outlaws and more respectable separatists was not accidental, nor did it prove peripheral to Independence strategies. Thieves, extortioners, kidnappers, and killers who cast their lot with veteran insurgents emerged from and contributed to, a century of social and economic upheaval; the reasons cited by many bandits for their outlawry were the same as those that appeared as complaints in revolutionary manifestos. Ransom and extortion money furnished by bandits also often replenished the bankrupt coffers of the rebellion. Manuel Garcia, a hero-villian of Cuban folklore to this day, was the most notorious of the brigand-patriots and led a gang that spread terror throughout Havana province, contributing to the breakdown of rural order that preceded full-scale rebellion in 1895. Lawless Liberators examines the origins, actions, and ends (often sudden and violent) of the bandit groups such as Garcia’s that paved the way for the revolution and offers a reasoned and balanced analysis of their role in those dramatic events.
Table of Contents
Prefacep. ix
Lawless Liberators: Political Banditry and Cuban Independencep. xi
Introduction Bandoleros and Their Political Bedfellowsp. 1
Cuban Awakening Outlaws on a Boisterous Frontierp. 15
Havana's Brigands: Extraordinary Actors in an Exceptional Dramap. 51
Luckless Liberators: Rebels In Exile Forge the Bandit Chainp. 98
Manuel García Declares Warp. 139
Havana Battleground 1890p. 160
García Versus Polavieja The Struggle for Controlp. 187
Cuba Libre: a Marriage Of Convenience Ends in Divorcep. 225
Appendix Major Participants in Cuba's1880s Insurrectionist Conspiraciesp. 251
Notesp. 254
Glossary Of Spanish Termsp. 284
Bibliographyp. 286
Indexp. 291
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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