Catalogue


Phage nanobiotechnology [electronic resource] /
edited by Valery A. Petrenko, George P. Smith.
imprint
Cambridge : RSC Pub., c2011.
description
xiv, 273 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0854041842, 9780854041848
format(s)
Book
More Details
imprint
Cambridge : RSC Pub., c2011.
isbn
0854041842
9780854041848
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
catalogue key
12598771
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Summaries
Back Cover Copy
Several books and many papers have been published during the last decade on the design and the use of new nanomaterials in medicine and technology, which describe major concepts of nanotechnology. Meanwhile, a new promising type of nanomaterials-bacteriophages-emerged recently as a result of the evolution of phage display technique. Bacteriophages have a unique feature - completely the opposite of other nanomaterials -their structure and function are encrypted in their genomic DNA, which can be intentionally modified or even rewritten using routine genetic engineering techniques. In particular, a paradigm of landscape phage with multivalently displayed foreign peptides evolved, which allows constructing phage with unique surface architectures and emerged properties. Recently, phage, as a new kind of nanomaterials attracted the attention of specialists working in peripheral, and even very diverse areas from genetics and molecular biology, such as pharmaceutical science, material science, microelectronics, biosensors, detection, environmental sciences, etc. Penetration of the phage technology into these new disciplines required the development of a new instructive concept, which resulted in this publication. This comprehensive book, of value to researchers as well as scientists, introduces readers into this hot new area of phage nanobiotechnology. It summarises the existing data on the phage nanomaterials and discusses their use in different areas of medicine, science and technology. With contributions by top level experts and pioneers in phage display, the major goal of this book is to bring the phage display technique closer to specialists in these diverse areas of medicine, science and technology, where phage-derived nanomaterials can be most beneficial.
Bowker Data Service Summary
Phage is a new kind of nanomaterial which has attracted the attention of specialists working in the field. This text brings the phage display technique closer to specialists in areas of medicine, science and technology, where phage-derived nanomaterials can be most beneficial.
Description for Bookstore
Bacteriophages have recently emerged as a result of the evolution of phage display techniques. In opposite to other nanomaterials, the bacteriophages have a unique feature: their structure and function are encrypted in their genomic DNA, which can be intentionally modified or even rewritten using routine genetic engineering techniques. Recently, phage - as a new kind of nanomaterial has attracted attention of specialists working in the boundaries of the field and even further afield from genetics and molecular biology, such as pharmaceutical science, material science, microelectronics, biosensors, detection, environmental sciences, etc. This comprehensive book, of value to researchers in all fields, brings the phage display technique closer to specialists in areas of medicine, science and technology, where phage-derived nanomaterials can be most beneficial.
Table of Contents
The Phage Nanoparticle Toolkitp. 1
Introductionp. 1
Virion Structure and Purificationp. 1
Intrusionp. 4
DNA Replication Cycle and Gene Expressionp. 5
Extrusion of Progeny Virionsp. 6
Display of Guest Peptidesp. 7
The Engineer's Toolkitp. 8
Acknowledgementsp. 10
Referencesp. 10
The Roles of Structure, Dynamics and Assembly in the Display of Peptides on Filamentous Bacteriophagep. 12
Molecular and Structural Biology of Filamentous Bacteriophagep. 12
Packaging of the Genome into Filamentous Bacteriophagep. 14
Structural Form of the Major Coat Proteinp. 16
Membrane-bound Form of Filamentous Bacteriophage Coat Proteinsp. 21
Assemblyp. 24
Phage Displayp. 25
Conclusionp. 29
Acknowledgementsp. 29
Referencesp. 30
Quantitative Analysis of Peptide Librariesp. 33
Introductionp. 33
Assessing the Quality of a Phage-displayed Libraryp. 35
Peptide Sequence Censorshipp. 35
Experimental Measuresp. 36
Conceptual Measuresp. 36
Quantitative Measuresp. 37
Assessing the Quality of an Affinity Screen Experimentp. 42
Change in Diversityp. 43
Change in Informationp. 43
Identification of Motifs in a Peptide Populationp. 45
Similarity Matricesp. 45
Identification of Binding Sites in Proteinsp. 47
Identification of Binding Proteins in a Proteomep. 50
Relicp. 51
Discussionp. 53
Referencesp. 53
Phage-mediated Drug Deliveryp. 55
Introductionp. 55
Targeting of Drugs/Drug Carrier Systemsp. 58
Targeting Ligandsp. 59
Phage-displayed Libraries as a Source of Peptide Targeting Ligandsp. 60
Bacteriophage Capsid-mediated Drug Deliveryp. 62
Drug-bearing Filamentous Phage as Targeted Chemotherapeuticsp. 67
Phage Fusion Proteins as Targeting Ligands for Nanomedicinesp. 70
Conclusionp. 77
Acknowledgementsp. 78
Referencesp. 78
Imaging with Bacteriophage-derived Probesp. 83
Selection of Bacteriophage as Imaging Probesp. 83
Imaging Agentsp. 83
Phage Nanoparticlesp. 85
Phage Display for Imaging Probe Discoveryp. 85
Radiolabled Phage as Imaging Agentsp. 87
Optical Molecular Imaging with Phagep. 93
Conclusionp. 97
Referencesp. 97
Phage-based Pathogen Biosensorsp. 101
Introductionp. 101
Threat of Pathogenic Microorganismsp. 101
Pathogen Detection Techniquesp. 102
Current Trends and Existing Methodologies for Pathogen Detectionp. 103
Conventional Pathogen Detection Techniquesp. 103
Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR)p. 104
Enzyme-linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA)p. 105
Biosensor Techniquesp. 107
Biomolecular Recognition Elementp. 108
Whole Filamentous Bacteriophage Particles as a Biorecognition Probep. 110
Phage Immobilization on Biosensor Platformsp. 112
Current Trends in Development of Phage-based Biosensorsp. 118
Phage-based Magnetoelastic Particle Resonator Biosensorsp. 126
Magnetoelastic (ME) Particle Resonator Sensor Platformp. 126
Fabrication of the Sensor Platformp. 129
ME Biosensor Assemblyp. 132
Performance of Phage-based ME Biosensorsp. 133
Conclusionp. 148
Acknowledgementsp. 148
Referencesp. 149
Phage-mediated Detection of Biological Threatsp. 156
Introductionp. 156
Phage Typing Schemesp. 157
Exploiting Phage Specificity for Bacterial Detectionp. 158
Labeled Phagep. 158
Reprter Phagep. 159
Phage Amplificationp. 166
Electrochemical-based Sensing Assaysp. 170
Surface Plasmon Resonance-based Sensing Assaysp. 171
The Phage-mediated Adenylate Kinase Assayp. 171
Conclusionp. 172
Referencesp. 172
Genetically Engineered Virulent Phage Banks for the Detection and Control of Bacterial Biosecurity Threatsp. 175
Introductionp. 175
Host Range engineeringp. 179
Production of a Genetically Engineered T4 Phage Bank with Vastly Increased Host Rangep. 183
Reversible Inhibition of the T4 Lytic Cycle Within the Bacterial Hostp. 183
Large-scale Recombinations into the Genomes of an Infective Wild-type T4 Populationp. 188
Construction of a T4 Bank of Host Range Variantsp. 190
Discussionp. 190
Conclusion and Perspectivesp. 194
Methodsp. 195
High-fidelity PCRp. 195
Error-prone PCRp. 195
Selective High-fidelity Amplification of Desired Fragmentsp. 198
Reconstruction of Sequence Through PCRp. 198
DNA Sequencing and Analysisp. 199
Production and Expression of Non-functional E. coli Rho Genesp. 199
Construction and Expression of the Heat-inducible Red-Recombinase Systemp. 199
Acknowledgementsp. 199
Referencesp. 200
Site-directed Chemical Modification of Phage Particlesp. 202
Introductionp. 202
Unique Chemical Properties of Selenocysteine Compared with Cysteinep. 203
In vivo Incorporation of Sec by E. colip. 205
Construction of Selenopeptide-displayed Phage Librariesp. 207
Applications Using Selenopeptide Phage Displayp. 209
Screening for Sec Insertion in vivo: Investigating the Stringency of E. coli SECIS Requirements Using Phage Displayp. 209
Catalysis-based Selection of Novel Enzyme Activities from Substrate-appended Phage Librariesp. 212
Mechanical Manipulation of M13 Phagep. 215
Conclusionp. 216
Referencesp. 216
Filamentous Fhage-templated Synthesis and Assembly of Inorganic Nanomaterialsp. 220
Introductionp. 220
Virion Structure and Phage Displayp. 221
Biologyp. 221
Chemistryp. 224
Site-specific Engineering of the Virion Surfacep. 225
Liquid Crystalline Behaviorp. 225
Exploiting Phage Display to Alter Surface Chemistry by Selection Rather Than Rational Design225
Random Peptide Libraries225
Affinity Selection ('Biopanning')226
Synthesis and Assembly of Inorganic Materials on Individual Virionsp. 227
Synthesis and Assembly of Inorganic Materials on a Self-assembled Phage Scaffoldp. 231
Applications of Phage-templated Nanomaterialsp. 234
Summary and Outlookp. 239
Acknowledgementsp. 240
Referencesp. 240
Phage Vaccines and Phage Therapyp. 245
Introduction to Phagep. 245
Phage Immunogensp. 246
Epitope Discovery with Phage Libraries and Phage Vaccinesp. 248
Autoimmune Disordersp. 251
Cancerp. 251
Neurological Disordersp. 252
Other Diseasesp. 252
Antibacterial Therapyp. 253
Conclusionp. 255
Referencesp. 256
Subject Indexp. 259
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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