Catalogue


Threats to optimal development : integrating biological, psychological, and social risk factors /
edited by Charles A. Nelson.
imprint
Hillsdale, N.J. : L. Erlbaum Associates, 1994.
description
xvi, 352 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0805815104
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Hillsdale, N.J. : L. Erlbaum Associates, 1994.
isbn
0805815104
general note
"... Represents the papers presented at the 27th Minnesota Symposium on Child Psychology, held 22-24 October 1992, at the University of Minnesota, Minneapolis"--Pref.
catalogue key
12553684
 
Includes bibliographical references and indexes.
A Look Inside
Summaries
Back Cover Copy
Psychology's recent immersion in risk research has introduced a new variant in which the focus is not solely on disease, but also on the effects and consequences produced by the multiple aspects of risk on individual adaptation. Variations in such patterns of adaptation signal the entrance of protective factors as an added element to the clinical and research focus in the prediction of positive versus negative outcomes under the duress of stressful experiences. Given psychology's investment in the entire range of human adaptation--embracing severe disorder at one extreme and strong positive adaptations at the other--it is not surprising to find this new element of compensatory protective factors as a reshaping factor in the field of risk research. It is one that recognizes and studies the relevance of risk influences on disorder, but also focuses on recovery from disorder or the absence of disorder despite the presence of risk. This latter element implicates the notion of "resilience." It is this opening of the field of risk research that seems to bear the heavy and welcome imprint of psychology. Fundamental to the study of protective factors in development, however, is a broad knowledge base focused on risk factors that often contain the healthy development of infants and children. This volume reflects a continuation of the concerns of the Institute of Child Development with the nature and content of development in multiple contexts. It comes at a most welcome point since the Institute--in collaboration with the University of Minnesota's Department of Psychology--now participates in a jointly shared graduate training program in clinical psychology which stimulates and supports the growth of a newly emergent developmental psychopathology. For this field to advance will require a broad perspective and acceptance of the significance of the diversity of risk factors that extends throughout the life span and results in developmental trajectories that implicate various biological, psychological, and sociocultural risk elements.
Main Description
Psychology's recent immersion in risk research has introduced a new variant in which the focus is not solely on disease, but also on the effects and consequences produced by the multiple aspects of risk on individual adaptation. Variations in such patterns of adaptation signal the entrance of protective factors as an added element to the clinical and research focus in the prediction of positive versus negative outcomes under the duress of stressful experiences. Given psychology's investment in the entire range of human adaptation--embracing severe disorder at one extreme and strong positive adaptations at the other--it is not surprising to find this new element of compensatory protective factors as a reshaping factor in the field of risk research. It is one that recognizes and studies the relevance of risk influences on disorder, but also focuses on recovery from disorder or the absence of disorder despite the presence of risk. This latter element implicates the notion of "resilience." It is this opening of the field of risk research that seems to bear the heavy and welcome imprint of psychology. Fundamental to the study of protective factors in development, however, is a broad knowledge base focused on risk factors that often contain the healthy development of infants and children. This volume reflects a continuation of the concerns of the Institute of Child Development with the nature and content of development in multiple contexts. It comes at a most welcome point since the Institute--in collaboration with the University of Minnesota's Department of Psychology--now participates in a jointly shared graduate training program in clinical psychology which stimulates and supports the growth of a newly emergent developmental psychopathology . For this field to advance will require a broad perspective and acceptance of the significance of the diversity of risk factors that extends throughout the life span and results in developmental trajectories that implicate various biological, psychological, and sociocultural risk elements.
Table of Contents
Prefacep. xiii
Trends and Directions In Studies of Developmental Riskp. 1
Synaptogenesis, Synapse Elimination, and Neural Plasticity in Human Cerebral Cortexp. 35
Referencesp. 51
Plasticity and Reorganization In Neural Injury And Neural Graftingp. 55
Referencesp. 65
Developmental Psychopathology of Antisocial Behavior: Inserting Genes Into Its Ontogenesis and Epigenesisp. 69
Referencesp. 105
Nutritional Deficiencies As Developmental Risk Factorsp. 121
Referencesp. 143
Nutritional Deficiencies As Developmental Risk Factors Commentary on Pollitt And Gormanp. 145
Development, Plasticity, And Risk: Commentary On Huttenlocher, Pollitt And Gorman, and Gottesman And Goldsmithp. 161
The Special Role of Parenting In the Context of Poverty The Case of Adolescent Motherhoodp. 179
Poverty and Adolescent Childbearing: the Dangers Of the 'Half Empty Glass' Perspectivep. 217
Poverty, Violence, and Child Development: Untangling Family and Community Level Effectsp. 229
The Role of Biological And Psychosocial Risk Factors In Development: Commentary On Kopp, Musick, and Aberp. 273
Referencesp. 284
Integrating Developmental Risk Factors: Perspectives From Developmental Psychopathologyp. 285
Author Indexp. 327
Subject Indexp. 347
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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