Catalogue


The staff of Oedipus [electronic resource] : transforming disability in ancient Greece /
Martha L. Rose.
imprint
Ann Arbor : University of Michigan Press, c2003.
description
ix, 154 p. : ill., ports. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0472113399 (cloth : alk. paper), 9780472113392 (cloth : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
More Details
series title
series title
imprint
Ann Arbor : University of Michigan Press, c2003.
isbn
0472113399 (cloth : alk. paper)
9780472113392 (cloth : alk. paper)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
catalogue key
12527392
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 131-148) and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2004-06-01:
The defendant in Lysias 24 needed two crutches to walk, but could ride a horse. He defended his right to a pension as one "unable" because he had no inheritance, a mother to support, no children to support him, and he was getting old himself. His accuser regarded him as "abled," it seems, because he was rich enough to have a horse to ride. The outcome of the case is unknown. Rose's categorizations (blindness, deafness, lameness, and speech defects) are modern. Lysias's client understood very well that it was society that defined "disabled," and identified his own disability as a deformity of family, inheritance, and age, more than body. Social status also mattered. A speech defect in an aristocrat (Alcibiades's lisp) could be charming. How then do we evaluate reactions to the speech impediment of the nonaristocratic Demosthenes? Such problems are inherent in Rose's project. Evidence on disability in ancient Greece is fragmentary and the context elusive. Rose (Truman State Univ.) deals honestly with the evidence she has, but shows the way to others more than she breaks new ground herself. This is a reliable, though limited, introduction to an important subject. ^BSumming Up: Recommended. Most levels and libraries. C. M. C. Green University of Iowa
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This item was reviewed in:
Choice, June 2004
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Summaries
Main Description
Ancient Greek images of disability permeate the Western consciousness: Homer, Teiresias, and Oedipus immediately come to mind. But The Staff of Oedipus looks at disability in the ancient world through the lens of disability studies, and reveals that our interpretations of disability in the ancient world are often skewed. These false assumptions in turn lend weight to modern-day discriminatory attitudes toward disability. Martha L. Rose considers a range of disabilities and the narratives surrounding them. She examines not only ancient literature, but also papyrus, skeletal material, inscriptions, sculpture, and painting, and draws upon modern work, including autobiographies of people with disabilities, medical research, and theoretical work in disability studies. Her study uncovers the realities of daily life for people with disabilities in ancient Greece and challenges the translation of the term adunatos (unable) as "disabled," with all its modern associations.
Main Description
Ancient Greek images of disability permeate the Western consciousness: Homer, Teiresias, and Oedipus immediately come to mind. But The Staff of Oedipus looks at disability in the ancient world through the lens of disability studies, and reveals that our interpretations of disability in the ancient world are often skewed. These false assumptions in turn lend weight to modern-day discriminatory attitudes toward disability. Martha Rose considers a range of disabilities and the narratives surrounding them. She examines not only ancient literature, but also papyrus, skeletal material, inscriptions, sculpture, and painting, and draws upon modern work, including autobiographies of people with disabilities, medical research, and theoretical work in disability studies. Her study uncovers the realities of daily life for people with disabilities in ancient Greece, and challenges the translation of the term adunatos (unable) as "disabled," with all its modern associations. Martha Rose is Associate Professor of History, Truman State University.
Bowker Data Service Summary
Martha L. Rose follows myths of disability back to the culture of ancient Greece. She also studies the daily lives of people with disabilities in ancient Greece.
Table of Contents
List of Abbreviations
Introductionp. 1
The Landscape of Disabilityp. 9
Killing Defective Babiesp. 29
Demosthenes' Stutter: Overcoming Impairmentp. 50
Croesus's Other Son: Deafness in a Culture of Communicationp. 66
Degrees of Sight and Blindnessp. 79
Conclusions: Ability and Disability in Lysias 24p. 95
Notesp. 101
Referencesp. 131
Indexp. 149
Table of Contents provided by Blackwell. All Rights Reserved.

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