Catalogue


Tudor frontiers and noble power : the making of the British state /
Steven G. Ellis.
imprint
Oxford : Clarendon Press, 1995.
description
xxi, 303 p. : maps.
ISBN
0198201338 :
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Oxford : Clarendon Press, 1995.
isbn
0198201338 :
catalogue key
1247863
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [273]-286).
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 1996-02:
Ellis has written an important comparative study of the administration of the borderlands from 1485-1540, focusing on the earls of Kildare in Ireland and the Lords Dacre in northern England. He chides English historians for concentrating on southern, lowland England, arguing that a complete account of the Tudor regime must give equal treatment to non-English territories. Ellis contends that by reducing financial and military support to the borders, Henry VII, and especially Henry VIII, forced the earls of Kildare and the Lords Dacre to build up powerful local affinities in order to defend the frontiers against the Gaelic Irish and the Scots. This in turn threatened Tudor government and led to a crisis in 1534, in which the 9th earl was executed for treason, while William, Lord Dacre, was heavily fined and removed from office. Ellis also maintains that this forced the central government to pay more attention to peripheral territories and was an important step in the formation of the later multinational British state. Although profoundly scholarly, this book should be accessible and interesting even to general readers. W. B. Robison III; Southeastern Louisiana University
Reviews
Review Quotes
'an engaging and scholarly contribution to our knowledge of two important frontiers ... Ellis's scholarship is meticulous ... his ongoing move away from court-based or indeed Anglocentric history is a good example for British historians to follow.'Maureen M. Meikle, University of Sutherland, History 83/269
"An important comparative study of the administration of the borderlands from 1485-1540, focusing on the earls of Kildare in Ireland and the Lords Dacre in northern England."--Choice "In this exploration, Ellis displays the estimable scholarly qualities that have marked him as a first-rate historian: an impressive command of a multitude of sources, the ability to construct a careful and detailed narrative, and a willingess to tackle controversial issues."--American Historical Review "...a provocative work..."--The Albion
"An important comparative study of the administration of the borderlands from 1485-1540, focusing on the earls of Kildare in Ireland and the Lords Dacre in northern England."-- Choice "In this exploration, Ellis displays the estimable scholarly qualities that have marked him as a first-rate historian: an impressive command of a multitude of sources, the ability to construct a careful and detailed narrative, and a willingess to tackle controversial issues."-- American Historical Review "...a provocative work..."-- The Albion
"An important comparative study of the administration of the borderlands from 1485-1540, focusing on the earls of Kildare in Ireland and the Lords Dacre in northern England."--Choice "In this exploration, Ellis displays the estimable scholarly qualities that have marked him as a first-rate historian: an impressive command of a multitude of sources, the ability to construct a careful and detailed narrative, and a willingess to tackle controversial issues."--American HistoricalReview "...a provocative work..."--The Albion
'a very personal scholarly statement ... The author has been well known for a number of years as an incisive and objective historian of Tudor Ireland. It is hard to quarrel with his detailed and painstaking research, or with the cautious and intelligent way in which his conclusions arepresented.'History Today
'E. has written yet another highly accomplished monograph: less ambitious in range but more sophisticated in planning and execution of its aims than previous publications by other researchers ... The monograph is well written, closely argued and likely to provoke the kind of healthy debatethat promotes further research endeavours rather than demolishing other historians as irredeemable enemies.'Archive for Reformation History
'Ellis has written an important comparative study of the administration of the borderlands from 1485-1540 ... profoundly scholarly, this book should be accessible and interesting even to general readers.'W.B. Robison III, Southeastern Louisiana University, Choice, February 1996, Vol.33 No. 6
'well executed and interesting ... a very personal scholarly statement ... It is hard to quarrel with his detailed and painstaking research, or with the cautious and intelligent way in which his conclusions are presented. Professor Ellis establishes with considerable learning that there was anaristocratic marcher culture.'David Loades, History Today, August 1996
'With this fine study Ellis augments his earlier contributions to the once neglected history of the Tudor borderlands and their impact on political relations between England on one hand and Ireland, Scotland, and Wales on the other.'William B. Robinson, Southeastern Louisiana University (Hammond) Sixteenth Century Journal XXVII/1 (11996)
'a very personal scholarly statement ... The author has been well known for a number of years as an incisive and objective historian of Tudor Ireland. It is hard to quarrel with his detailed and painstaking research, or with the cautious and intelligent way in which his conclusions are presented.'History Today'E. has written yet another highly accomplished monograph: less ambitious in range but more sophisticated in planning and execution of its aims than previous publications by other researchers ... The monograph is well written, closely argued and likely to provoke the kind of healthy debate that promotes further research endeavours rather than demolishing other historians as irredeemable enemies.'Archive for Reformation History'With this fine study Ellis augments his earlier contributions to the once neglected history of the Tudor borderlands and their impact on political relations between England on one hand and Ireland, Scotland, and Wales on the other.'William B. Robinson, Southeastern Louisiana University (Hammond) Sixteenth Century Journal XXVII/1 (11996)'well executed and interesting ... a very personal scholarly statement ... It is hard to quarrel with his detailed and painstaking research, or with the cautious and intelligent way in which his conclusions are presented. Professor Ellis establishes with considerable learning that there was an aristocratic marcher culture.'David Loades, History Today, August 1996'Ellis has written an important comparative study of the administration of the borderlands from 1485-1540 ... profoundly scholarly, this book should be accessible and interesting even to general readers.'W.B. Robison III, Southeastern Louisiana University, Choice, February 1996, Vol.33 No. 6'an engaging and scholarly contribution to our knowledge of two important frontiers ... Ellis's scholarship is meticulous ... his ongoing move away from court-based or indeed Anglocentric history is a good example for British historians to follow.'Maureen M. Meikle, University of Sutherland, History 83/269
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, February 1996
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Summaries
Long Description
This controversial book offers a novel perspective on Tudor government and British state formation. It argues that traditional studies focusing on lowland England as 'the normal context of government' exaggerate the regime's successes by marginalizing the borderlands. Frontiers were normal in early-modern Europe, however, and central to the problem of state formation. England's peripheries were more extensive than the core and provide the real yardstick by which the effectiveness of government can be measured. Ellis demonstrates their importance by means of a detailed comparative study of two marches - Cumbria and Ireland - and their ruling magnates. He demonstrates the flaws in early Tudor policy, characterized by long periods of neglect, interspersed with sporadic attempts to adapt, at minimal cost, a centralized administrative system geared to lowland England for the government of outlying regions which had very different social structures. Ellis analyses the 1534 crisis in crown-magnate relations, reassesses the resulting policy of centralization and uniformity, and identifies the central role of these developments in establishing a British pattern of state formation.
Long Description
Tudor Frontiers and Noble Power takes a new and controversial look at Tudor government and the formation of the British state, from the perspective of the borderlands which collectively made up over half of English territory. Steven Ellis argues that it was the frontiers, not lowland England, which provided the real test of Tudor statesmanship. After 1534 the borderlands were drawn more closely into the Tudor state but by a policy which was seriously flawed and could not be applied to Scotland after 1603.
Main Description
This controversial book offers a novel perspective on Tudor government and British state formation. It argues that traditional studies focusing on lowland England as 'the normal context of government' exaggerate the regime's successes by marginalizing the borderlands. Frontiers were normalin early-modern Europe, however, and central to the problem of state formation. England's peripheries were more extensive than the core and provide the real yardstick by which the effectiveness of government can be measured.Ellis demonstrates their importance by means of a detailed comparative study of two marches - Cumbria and Ireland - and their ruling magnates. He demonstrates the flaws in early Tudor policy, characterized by long periods of neglect, interspersed with sporadic attempts to adapt, at minimal cost, acentralized administrative system geared to lowland England for the government of outlying regions which had very different social structures.Ellis analyses the 1534 crisis in crown-magnate relations, reassesses the resulting policy of centralization and uniformity, and identifies the central role of these developments in establishing a British pattern of state formation.
Table of Contents
Note on punctuation, coinage, and datesp. xvi
List of mapsp. xvii
List of abbreviationsp. xviii
The Problem of the Marches
Introduction: The Tudor borderlands in contextp. 3
The origins of the early-Tudor problemp. 18
Early-Tudor policy and perceptionsp. 46
Noble Power and Border Rule
The estates and connexion of Lord Dacre of the Northp. 81
The estates and connexion of the earl of Kildarep. 107
The Dacre ascendancy in the far northp. 146
The Crisis of 1534
The origins of the crisisp. 173
Confrontation: the Irish campaign of 1534-1535 and its consequencesp. 207
Submission and survival: Dacre fortunes in Henry VIII's later yearsp. 233
Conclusion: Tudor government and the transformation of the Tudor statep. 251
Bibliographyp. 273
Indexp. 287
Table of Contents provided by Syndetics. All Rights Reserved.

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