Catalogue

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Changing places [electronic resource] : society, culture, and territory in the Saxon-Bohemian borderlands, 1870-1946 /
Caitlin E. Murdock.
imprint
Ann Arbor : University of Michigan Press, c2010.
description
x, 275 p. : maps ; 24 cm.
ISBN
047211722X (cloth : alk. paper), 9780472117222 (cloth : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
More Details
imprint
Ann Arbor : University of Michigan Press, c2010.
isbn
047211722X (cloth : alk. paper)
9780472117222 (cloth : alk. paper)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
contents note
Birth of a borderland -- A region on the move : labor migration and the rethinking of space, 1870-1914 -- "Every reason to be on their guard!" : German nationalism across the frontier, 1880-1914 -- What's in a state? : citizens, sovereignty, and territory in the Great War, 1914-19 -- The ties that bind : economic mobility, economic crisis, and geographies of instability, 1919-29 -- Connecting people to places : foreigners and citizens in frontier society, 1919-32 -- Borderlands in crisis, 1929-33 -- "No border is eternal" : the road to dissolution, 1933-38 -- Epilogue: Occupation, expulsion, and resurrection.
catalogue key
12478176
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 253-264) and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2011-02-01:
Murdock (California State Univ., Long Beach) surveys the development of both sides of the Saxon-Bohemian border from German unification to WW II. She challenges notions of national essentialism and of the significance of frontiers, noting that southern Saxony and northern Bohemia developed as an integrated economic and cultural region as a result of industrialization, increased labor mobility, and mass communications. She observes that many of its inhabitants, bilingual in German and Czech and intermarried across state and ethnocultural frontiers, were not easily classified as belonging to either national group. During this period, local, class, and religious identities were often more salient than nationality, and people and goods flowed freely across the border. This period of coexistence and interdependence ended after WW I, as a newly created Czechoslovakia sought to revive a sense of Czech nationhood and a defeated Germany looked to the borderlands as sites of national renewal and territorial expansion. Murdock presents residents of the borderlands, whether Saxons, Czechs, or Sudeten Germans, as active protagonists in the making and unmaking of local and national identities, and argues that events in the borderlands often forced the hand of governments. Summing Up: Recommended. Upper-division undergraduates and above. D. A. Harvey New College of Florida
Reviews
Review Quotes
"...a bold and thoughtful book that only a handful of historians could write. Crossing borders and combining historiographies has led to an important work that should find a wide audience among historians of Saxony, Germany, Bohemia, the Habsburg monarchy, and Czechoslovakianot to mention the growing legion of scholars who simply prefer to be called historians of Central Europe." Chad Bryant, H-Net Reviews
"...a pioneering piece of research...an impressive and fascinating read." Milos Reznik, Slavic Review
"By offering an in-depth and dynamic portrayal of borderland life, Murdock provides a compelling version of Central Europe's past that differs greatly from ones that focus exclusively on nations and heads of state." ---David Gerlach, German Studies Review
"Caitlin E. Murdock's book is a significant contribution to the growing literature on frontiers in European history. Her impressive research in both German and Czech archives allows her to write a book that is simultaneously transnational and regional, using the history of the Saxo-Bohemian borderlands to challenge the centrality of the nation-state in the history of Central Europe." Annemarie Sammartino, The American Historical Review
"[Caitlin Murdock] makes a valuable contribution to the history of statesociety relations...." Cathleen M. Giustino, Social History
" Changing Places adds an interesting and well-researched empirical study of northwestern Bohemia, which nicely supplements previous investigations of localities in the south of the province. It makes a significant contribution to the growing body of literature on Bohemia's borders and identities." Austrian History Yearbook, Peter Thaler, Univ. of Southern Denmark
"[Murdock] challenges the notions of national essentialism and of the significance of frontiers, noting that southern Saxony and northern Bohemia developed as an integrated economic and cultural region as a result of industrialization, increased labor mobility, and mass communications...Murdock presents residents of the borderlands, whether Saxons, Czechs, or Sudeten Germans, as active protagonists in the making and unmaking of local and national identities, and argues that events in the borderlands often forced the hand of governments." Choice, D A Harvey, New College of Florida
"Murdock has written a bold and thoughtful book that only a handful of historians could write. Crossing borders and combining historiographies has led to an important work that should find a wide audience among historians of Saxony, Germany, Bohemia, the Habsburg monarchy, and Czechoslovakianot to mention the growing legion of scholars who simply prefer to be called historians of Central Europe." - Chad Bryant, Habsburg (H-Net)
"...Murdock's book provides excellent insights into life along the Saxon-Bohemian frontier from the late nineteenth century through the interwar period. It is a welcome addition to the scholarship on borderlands and will be an essential point of reference for future contributions to the field." -- James Bjork, Journal of Modern History
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, February 2011
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Main Description
"Changing Placesis an interesting meditation on the varying identities and rights claimed by residents of borderlands, the limits placed on the capacities of nation-states to police their borders and enforce national identities, and the persistence of such contact zones in the past and present. It is an extremely well-written and engaging study, and an absolute pleasure to read." ---Dennis Sweeney, University of Alberta Changing Placesis a transnational history of the birth, life, and death of a modern borderland and of frontier peoples' changing relationships to nations, states, and territorial belonging. The cross-border region between Germany and Habsburg, Austria---and after 1918 between Germany and Czechoslovakia---became an international showcase for modern state building, nationalist agitation, and local pragmatism after World War I, in the 1930s, and again after 1945. Caitlin Murdock uses wide-ranging archival and published sources from Germany and the Czech Republic to tell a truly transnational story of how state, regional, and local historical actors created, and eventually destroyed, a cross-border region.Changing Placesdemonstrates the persistence of national fluidity, ambiguity, and ambivalence in Germany long after unification and even under fascism. It shows how the 1938 Nazi annexation of the Czechoslovak "Sudetenland" became imaginable to local actors and political leaders alike. At the same time, it illustrates that the Czech-German nationalist conflict and Hitler's Anschluss are only a small part of the larger, more complex borderland story that continues to shape local identities and international politics today. Caitlin Murdock is Assistant Professor of History at California State University, Long Beach.
Main Description
" Changing Placesis an interesting meditation on the varying identities and rights claimed by residents of borderlands, the limits placed on the capacities of nation-states to police their borders and enforce national identities, and the persistence of such contact zones in the past and present. It is an extremely well-written and engaging study, and an absolute pleasure to read." ---Dennis Sweeney, University of Alberta " Changing Placesoffers a brilliantly transnational approach to its subject, the kind that historians perennially demand of themselves but almost never accomplish in practice." ---Pieter M. Judson, Swarthmore College Changing Placesis a transnational history of the birth, life, and death of a modern borderland and of frontier peoples' changing relationships to nations, states, and territorial belonging. The cross-border region between Germany and Habsburg Austria---and after 1918 between Germany and Czechoslovakia---became an international showcase for modern state building, nationalist agitation, and local pragmatism after World War I, in the 1930s, and again after 1945. Caitlin Murdock uses wide-ranging archival and published sources from Germany and the Czech Republic to tell a truly transnational story of how state, regional, and local historical actors created, and eventually destroyed, a cross-border region. Changing Placesdemonstrates the persistence of national fluidity, ambiguity, and ambivalence in Germany long after unification and even under fascism. It shows how the 1938 Nazi annexation of the Czechoslovak "Sudetenland" became imaginable to local actors and political leaders alike. At the same time, it illustrates that the Czech-German nationalist conflict and Hitler's Anschluss are only a small part of the larger, more complex borderland story that continues to shape local identities and international politics today. Caitlin E. Murdock is Associate Professor of History at California State University, Long Beach. Jacket Credit: Cover art courtesy of the author
Main Description
"Changing Placesis an interesting meditation on the varying identities and rights claimed by residents of borderlands, the limits placed on the capacities of nation-states to police their borders and enforce national identities, and the persistence of such contact zones in the past and present. It is an extremely well-written and engaging study, and an absolute pleasure to read." ---Dennis Sweeney, University of Alberta"Changing Placesoffers a brilliantly transnational approach to its subject, the kind that historians perennially demand of themselves but almost never accomplish in practice." ---Pieter M. Judson, Swarthmore CollegeChanging Placesis a transnational history of the birth, life, and death of a modern borderland and of frontier peoples' changing relationships to nations, states, and territorial belonging. The cross-border region between Germany and Habsburg Austria---and after 1918 between Germany and Czechoslovakia---became an international showcase for modern state building, nationalist agitation, and local pragmatism after World War I, in the 1930s, and again after 1945.Caitlin Murdock uses wide-ranging archival and published sources from Germany and the Czech Republic to tell a truly transnational story of how state, regional, and local historical actors created, and eventually destroyed, a cross-border region.Changing Placesdemonstrates the persistence of national fluidity, ambiguity, and ambivalence in Germany long after unification and even under fascism. It shows how the 1938 Nazi annexation of the Czechoslovak "Sudetenland" became imaginable to local actors and political leaders alike. At the same time, it illustrates that the Czech-German nationalist conflict and Hitler's Anschluss are only a small part of the larger, more complex borderland story that continues to shape local identities and international politics today.Caitlin E. Murdock is Associate Professor of History at California State University, Long Beach.Jacket Credit: Cover art courtesy of the author
Table of Contents
Prefacep. ix
Abbreviationsp. xi
Introductionp. 1
Birth of a Borderlandp. 17
A Region on the Move: Labor Migration and the Rethinking of Space, 1870-1914p. 33
"Every reason to be on their guard!" German Nationalism across the Frontier, 1880-1914p. 57
What's in a State? Citizens, Sovereignty, and Territory in the Great War, 1914-19p. 81
The Ties That Bind: Economic Mobility, Economic Crisis, and Geographies of Instability, 1919-29p. 112
Connecting People to Places: Foreigners and Citizens in Frontier Society, 1919-32p. 131
Borderlands in Crisis, 1929-33p. 158
"No border is eternal": The Road to Dissolution, 1933-38p. 181
Epilogue: Occupation, Expulsion, and Resurrectionp. 202
Notesp. 213
Selected Bibliographyp. 253
Indexp. 265
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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