Catalogue


Masking and unmasking the female mind : disguising romances in feminine fiction, 1713-1799 /
Mary Anne Schofield.
imprint
Newark : University of Delaware Press ; London ; Toronto : Associated University Presses, c1990.
description
217 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0874133653 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Newark : University of Delaware Press ; London ; Toronto : Associated University Presses, c1990.
isbn
0874133653 (alk. paper)
catalogue key
1246398
 
Gift to Victoria University Library. Sheps, Arthur. 2005/02/24.
Includes bibliographical references (p. [201]-212) and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 1990-12:
Schofield cites an alternative history of the novel: "the history of female fiction, the story of the romance' and woman's search for self through its pages and conventions." She sets out to explore two ideas--the "private-public dichotomy" of the woman writer, now familiar to feminist readers, and the masquerade, previously discussed by Terry Castle with reference to masculine texts only. The strength of this book is its scope. In the process of exploring her themes, Scholfield uncovers and dissects a multitude of women writers--from Elizabeth Boyd to Mary Collyer in Part 1 and from the "later Haywood" through Jane West in Part 2. These chapters provide a valuable introduction to women's 18th-century texts for the uninitiated. Yet this same ambitious scope means that an overall argument concerning the ultimate meaning and form of a female tradition is less than clear; this book would have been stronger with a longer and more comprehensive introduction and conclusion. For libraries with large collections. -B. Kowaleski-Wallace, Boston College
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, December 1990
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Unpaid Annotation
This work concentrates on how eighteenth-century feminine novelists articulate the concerns important to women's lives and fates, and argues that these novelists used their romances to combat the controlling ideologies of the age.

This information is provided by a service that aggregates data from review sources and other sources that are often consulted by libraries, and readers. The University does not edit this information and merely includes it as a convenience for users. It does not warrant that reviews are accurate. As with any review users should approach reviews critically and where deemed necessary should consult multiple review sources. Any concerns or questions about particular reviews should be directed to the reviewer and/or publisher.

  link to old catalogue

Report a problem