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A woman's place is in the House [electronic resource] : campaigning for Congress in the feminist era /
Barbara C. Burrell.
edition
1st paperback ed.
imprint
Ann Arbor : University of Michigan Press, c1996.
description
211 p. : ill.
ISBN
9780472083848
format(s)
Book
More Details
added author
imprint
Ann Arbor : University of Michigan Press, c1996.
isbn
9780472083848
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
catalogue key
12463454
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 1995-04:
The fact that so few women have run for and won seats in Congress has sparked much theorizing and study as to why. This book significantly contributes to the scholarship by testing the conventional wisdom about the role that gender plays in national races. Burrell (Wisconsin Survey Research Laboratory) empirically evaluates the claims that female candidates have less success in raising funds; less support of parties, interest groups, and PACs; and are less favored by the voters. Her focus is the House campaigns during the feminist era of 1968-1992. Burrell avoids the pitfalls associated with generalization by distinguishing the primaries from the general elections, the open races from those with an incumbent running, and similarly situated male and female candidates from overall gender patterns. Her insights about the supply of female candidates, the role of incumbency, and women's impact on the legislative agenda make this must reading for those interested in women and politics. A good companion book to The Year of the Woman, edited by Elizabeth Cook, Sue Thomas, and Clyde Wilcox (1994), and Sue Thomas's How Women Legislate, (CH, Dec'94). References. Upper-division undergraduate and graduate libraries. and index. Wilsox S. Behuniak; Le Moyne College
Summaries
Main Description
In this first comprehensive examination of women candidates for the U.S. House of Representatives, Barbara Burrell argues that women are as successful at winning elections as men. Why, then, are there still so few women members of Congress? Compared to other democratically elected national parliaments, the U.S. Congress ranks very low in its proportion of women members. During the past decade, even though more and more women have participated in state and local governments, they have not made the same gains at the national level. A Woman's Place Is in the House examines the experiences of the women who have run for a seat in the U.S. House of Representatives from 1968 through 1992 and compares their presence and performance with that of male candidates. The longitudinal study examines both general and primary elections and refutes many myths associated with women candidates including their ability to raise money and garner support from both interest groups and political parties. According to Burrell, election year 1992 was correctly dubbed the "Year of the Woman" in American politics--not so much because women overcame perceived barriers to being elected but because for the first time a significant number of women chose to run in primaries. Burrell's study examines the effects women are having on the congressional agenda and offers insight on how such issues as term limitations and campaign finance reform will impact on the election of women to Congress. Barbara Burrell (Ph.D. University of Michigan) is professor and director of graduate studies in the Political Science Department at Northern Illinois University where she teaches courses in public opinion, political behavior and women and politics.
Main Description
In this first comprehensive examination of women candidates for the U.S. House of Representatives, Barbara Burrell argues that women are as successful at winning elections as men. Why, then, are there still so few women members of Congress? Compared to other democratically elected national parliaments, the U.S. Congress ranks very low in its proportion of women members. During the past decade, even though more and more women have participated in state and local governments, they have not made the same gains at the national level. A Woman's Place Is in the House examines the experiences of the women who have run for a seat in the U.S. House of Representatives from 1968 through 1992 and compares their presence and performance with that of male candidates. The longitudinal study examines both general and primary elections and refutes many myths associated with women candidates including their ability to raise money and garner support from both interest groups and political parties. According to Burrell, election year 1992 was correctly dubbed the "Year of the Woman" in American politics--not so much because women overcame perceived barriers to being elected but because for the first time a significant number of women chose to run in primaries. Burrell's study examines the effects women are having on the congressional agenda and offers insight on how such issues as term limitations and campaign finance reform will impact on the election of women to Congress. Barbara C. Burrell is a researcher at the Wisconsin Survey Research Laboratory
Main Description
In this first comprehensive examination of women candidates for the U.S. House of Representatives, Barbara Burrell argues that women are as successful at winning elections as men. Why, then, are there still so few women members of Congress? Compared to other democratically elected national parliaments, the U.S. Congress ranks very low in its proportion of women members. During the past decade, even though more and more women have participated in state and local governments, they have not made the same gains at the national level. A Woman's Place Is in the Houseexamines the experiences of the women who have run for a seat in the U.S. House of Representatives from 1968 through 1992 and compares their presence and performance with that of male candidates. The longitudinal study examines both general and primary elections and refutes many myths associated with women candidates including their ability to raise money and garner support from both interest groups and political parties. According to Burrell, election year 1992 was correctly dubbed the "Year of the Woman" in American politics--not so much because women overcame perceived barriers to being elected but because for the first time a significant number of women chose to run in primaries. Burrell's study examines the effects women are having on the congressional agenda and offers insight on how such issues as term limitations and campaign finance reform will impact on the election of women to Congress. Barbara C. Burrell is a researcher at the Wisconsin Survey Research Laboratory
Unpaid Annotation
In this first comprehensive examination of women candidates for the U.S. House of Representatives, Barbara Burrell argues that women are as successful at winning elections as men. Why, then, are there still so few women members of Congress? Compared to other democratically elected national parliaments, the U.S. Congress ranks very low in its proportion of women members. During the past decade, even though more and more women have participated in state and local governments, they have not made the same gains at the national level."A Woman's Place Is in the House examines the experiences of the women who have run for a seat in the U.S. House of Representatives from 1968 through 1992 and compares their presence and performance with that of male candidates. The longitudinal study examines both general and primary elections and refutes many myths associated with women candidates including their ability to raise money and garner support from both interest groups and political parties.According to Burrell, election year 1992 was correctly dubbed the "Year of the Woman" in American politics--not so much because women overcame perceived barriers to being elected but because for the first time a significant number of women chose to run in primaries. Burrell's study examines the effects women are having on the congressional agenda and offers insight on how such issues as term limitations and campaign finance reform will impact on the election of women to Congress
Table of Contents
Introductionp. 1
American Views of Women as Political Leaders: The Polls, Experiments, and Surveysp. 15
The Presence and Performance of Women Candidates in Primary Electionsp. 35
The Backgrounds of Female Candidates for the U.S. House of Representatives, 1968-92p. 57
Political Parties and Women's Candidaciesp. 81
Sex and Money: The Financing of Women's and Men's Campaigns for the U.S. House of Representatives, 1972-92p. 101
The Presence and Performance of Women Candidates in General Elections for the U.S. House of Representativesp. 131
Women Members of Congress and Policy Representationp. 151
Conclusionp. 183
Referencesp. 193
Indexp. 207
Table of Contents provided by Blackwell. All Rights Reserved.

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