Catalogue


Intelligence, political inequality, and public policy /
edited by Elliott White.
imprint
Westport, Conn. : Prager, 1997.
description
vi, 196 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0275956555 (hardcover : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
added author
imprint
Westport, Conn. : Prager, 1997.
isbn
0275956555 (hardcover : alk. paper)
catalogue key
1236203
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [185]) and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 1997-11:
Originating in a 1995 American Political Science Association conference panel, "Beyond the Bell Curve," this collection of essays adds considerably to the controversy surrounding issues of race, intelligence, and public policy. Arguing that a biological orientation to intelligence is increasingly supported by research, the authors present substantial evidence for the prevalence of the hypertrophic "Matthew effect," where natural differences are exaggerated by self-selection of environments, such as the "brain drain," or its opposite, the "brain gain," where talented people gather in informal "universities" such as Harlem in the 1920s or Silicon Valley today. The most perplexing issues arise from the unintended impact of liberal democracy and the free market in contributing to this inequality. As an example, magnet schools are discussed as factors in widening the achievement gap. However, the book looks at not only genetic and social factors contributing to inequality, but also neurobiological factors and those attributable to the physical environment, as in Roger Master's chapter on neurotoxicity. The volume effectively challenges the belief that mass literacy, education, and exposure to technology will lead to equality, but stops short of providing viable alternative public policy suggestions. Upper-division undergraduates through professionals. L. M. C. Abbott; formerly, California School of Professional Psychology
Reviews
Review Quotes
'œ[T]his collection of essays adds considerably to the controversy surrounding issues of race, intelligence, and public policy. Arguing that a biological orientation to intelligence is increasingly supported by research, the authors present substantial evidence for the prevalance of the hypertrophic 'Matthew effect,' where natural differences are exaggerated by self-selection of environments, such as the 'brain drain,' or its opposite, the 'brain gain,' where talented people gather in informal 'universities' such as Harlem in the 1920s or Silicon Valley tody. The most perplexing issues arise from the unintended impact of liberal democracy and the free market in contributing to this inequality.... the book looks at not only genetic and social factors contributing to inequality, but also neurobiological factors and those attributable to the physical environment... The volume effectively challenges the belief that mass literacy, education, and exposure to technology will lead to equality, but stops short of providing viable alternative public policy suggestions.'' Choice
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, November 1997
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Summaries
Long Description
This timely book deals directly with a topic increasingly in the news and on the minds of policy makers--political inequality. It is no coincidence that the official theme of the 1996 meeting of the American Political Science Association is the issue of political inequality. Drawing together a number of the leading writers on the topic, White provides a full and serious examination of the biological and environmental factors that may be involved. In looking at these factors, the book opens up new paths of exploration for political science, including the consideration of the role of the "pariah" variable of intelligence. A major work that researchers and policy makers of both liberal and conservative persuasion will need to confront.
Long Description
This timely book deals directly with a topic increasingly in the news and on the minds of policy makerspolitical inequality. It is no coincidence that the official theme of the 1996 meeting of the American Political Science Association is the issue of political inequality. Drawing together a number of the leading writers on the topic, White provides a full and serious examination of the biological and environmental factors that may be involved. In looking at these factors, the book opens up new paths of exploration for political science, including the consideration of the role of the pariah variable of intelligence. A major work that researchers and policy makers of both liberal and conservative persuasion will need to confront.
Table of Contents
Introduction
Policy Entrepreneurs and the Academic Establishment: The Bell Curve Controversy
The Bell Curve as Policy: Practical or Pablum
Intelligence and America's Oncoming Economic Divide
Nature's Matthew Effect: The Hypertrophic Basis of Increasing Political Inequality
Why The Bell Curve Didn't Go Far Enough on Race
Brain Biochemistry and Social Status: The Neurotoxicity Hypothesis
Further Readings
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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