Catalogue

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Louisiana [electronic resource] : crossroads of the Atlantic world /
edited by Cécile Vidal.
imprint
Philadelphia : University of Pennsylvania Press, c2014.
description
vi, 278 p. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
9780812245516 (hardcover : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
More Details
added author
series title
imprint
Philadelphia : University of Pennsylvania Press, c2014.
isbn
9780812245516 (hardcover : alk. paper)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
catalogue key
12346306
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Reviews
Review Quotes
"Sitting at the edges of a New France trading economy and a circum-Caribbean system of slavery as well as at the heart of what would become the continental United States, Louisiana did indeed sit at the crossroads of the Atlantic world. Bridging historiographic and nationalistic divides, Louisiana: Crossroads of the Atlantic World is a welcome addition to the transnational scholarship of eighteenth and early nineteenth century Louisiana."--Jennifer M. Spear, author of Race, Sex, and Social Order in Early New Orleans
"Sitting at the edges of a New France trading economy and a circum-Caribbean system of slavery as well as at the heart of what would become the continental United States, Louisiana did indeed sit at the crossroads of the Atlantic world. Bridging historiographic and nationalistic divides, Louisiana: Crossroads of the Atlantic World is a welcome addition to the transnational scholarship of eighteenth and early nineteenth century Louisiana."-Jennifer M. Spear, author of Race, Sex, and Social Order in Early New Orleans
"Sitting at the edges of a New France trading economy and a circum-Caribbean system of slavery as well as at the heart of what would become the continental United States, Louisiana did indeed sit at the crossroads of the Atlantic world. Bridging historiographic and nationalistic divides, Louisiana: Crossroads of the Atlantic World is a welcome addition to the transnational scholarship of eighteenth- and early-nineteenth century Louisiana."--Jennifer M. Spear, author of Race, Sex, and Social Order in Early New Orleans
"These smart essays make good on the transnational promises and post-colonial potential of Atlantic history. No one, ever again, will refer to Louisiana as the neglected stepchild of United States or French colonial history."--Catherine Desbarats, McGill University
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
Located at the junction of North America and the Caribbean, the vast territory of colonial Louisiana provides a paradigmatic case study for an Atlantic studies approach. One of the largest North American colonies and one of the last to be founded, Louisiana was governed by a succession of sovereignties, with parts ruled at various times by France, Spain, Britain, and finally by the United States. But just as these shifting imperial connections shaped the territory's culture, Louisiana's peculiar geography and history also yielded a distinctive colonization pattern that reflected a synthesis of continent and island societies. This book offers an exceptional collaboration among American, Canadian, and European historians who explore colonial and antebellum Louisiana's relations with the rest of the Atlantic world.
Main Description
Located at the junction of North America and the Caribbean, the vast territory of colonial Louisiana provides a paradigmatic case study for an Atlantic studies approach. One of the largest North American colonies and one of the last to be founded, Louisiana was governed by a succession of sovereignties, with parts ruled at various times by France, Spain, Britain, and finally the United States. But just as these shifting imperial connections shaped the territorys culture, Louisianas peculiar geography and history also yielded a distinctive colonization pattern that reflected a synthesis of continent and island societies."Louisiana: Crossroads of the Atlantic World" offers an exceptional collaboration among American, Canadian, and European historians who explore colonial and antebellum Louisianas relations with the rest of the Atlantic world. Studying the legacy of each period of Louisiana history over the longue duree, the essays create a larger picture of the ways early settlements influenced Louisiana society and how the changes of sovereignty and other circulations gave rise to a multiethnic society. Contributors examine the workings of empires through the examples of slave laws, administrative careers or on-the-ground political negotiations, cultural exchanges among masters, non-slave holders, and slaves, and the construction of race through sexuality, marriage and household formation. As a whole, the volume makes the compelling argument that one cannot write Louisiana history without adopting an Atlantic perspective, or Atlantic history without referring to Louisiana.Contributors: Guillaume Aubert, Emily Clark, Alexandre Dube, Sylvia R. Frey, Sylvia L. Hilton, Jean-Pierre Le Glaunec, Cecile Vidal, Sophie White, Mary Williams.
Main Description
Located at the junction of North America and the Caribbean, the vast territory of colonial Louisiana provides a paradigmatic case study for an Atlantic studies approach. One of the largest North American colonies and one of the last to be founded, Louisiana was governed by a succession of sovereignties, with parts ruled at various times by France, Spain, Britain, and finally the United States. But just as these shifting imperial connections shaped the territory's culture, Louisiana's peculiar geography and history also yielded a distinctive colonization pattern that reflected a synthesis of continent and island societies. Louisiana: Crossroads of the Atlantic World offers an exceptional collaboration among American, Canadian, and European historians who explore colonial and antebellum Louisiana's relations with the rest of the Atlantic world. Studying the legacy of each period of Louisiana history over the longue dure, the essays create a larger picture of the ways early settlements influenced Louisiana society and how the changes in sovereignty and other circulations gave rise to a multiethnic society. Contributors examine the workings of empire through the examples of slave laws, administrative careers or on-the-ground political negotiations, cultural exchanges among landowners, slave holders, and slaves, and the construction of race through sexuality, marriage, and household formation. As a whole, the volume makes the compelling argument that one cannot write Louisiana history without adopting an Atlantic perspective, or Atlantic history without referring to Louisiana. Contributors: Guillaume Aubert, Emily Clark, Alexandre Dub, Sylvia R. Frey, Sylvia L. Hilton, Jean-Pierre Le Glaunec, Ccile Vidal, Sophie White, Mary Williams.
Main Description
Located at the junction of North America and the Caribbean, the vast territory of colonial Louisiana provides a paradigmatic case study for an Atlantic studies approach. One of the largest North American colonies and one of the last to be founded, Louisiana was governed by a succession of sovereignties, with parts ruled at various times by France, Spain, Britain, and finally the United States. But just as these shifting imperial connections shaped the territory's culture, Louisiana's peculiar geography and history also yielded a distinctive colonization pattern that reflected a synthesis of continent and island societies. Louisiana: Crossroads of the Atlantic World offers an exceptional collaboration among American, Canadian, and European historians who explore colonial and antebellum Louisiana's relations with the rest of the Atlantic world. Studying the legacy of each period of Louisiana history over the longue durée, the essays create a larger picture of the ways early settlements influenced Louisiana society and how the changes of sovereignty and other circulations gave rise to a multiethnic society. Contributors examine the workings of empires through the examples of slave laws, administrative careers or on-the-ground political negotiations, cultural exchanges among masters, non-slave holders, and slaves, and the construction of race through sexuality, marriage and household formation. As a whole, the volume makes the compelling argument that one cannot write Louisiana history without adopting an Atlantic perspective, or Atlantic history without referring to Louisiana. Contributors: Guillaume Aubert, Emily Clark, Alexandre Dubé, Sylvia R. Frey, Sylvia L. Hilton, Jean-Pierre Le Glaunec, Cécile Vidal, Sophie White, Mary Williams.

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