Catalogue


Dangerous matter : English drama and politics in 1623/24 /
Jerzy Limon.
imprint
Cambridge [Cambridgeshire] ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 1986.
description
vii, 174 p. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0521306647
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Cambridge [Cambridgeshire] ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 1986.
isbn
0521306647
general note
Includes index.
catalogue key
1232890
 
Bibliography: p. 163-167.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 1987-02:
Limon's study is narrow, focusing on five plays-Ben Jonson's Neptune's Triumph, Thomas Drue's The Life of the Duchess of Suffolk, Philip Massinger's The Bondman, Thomas Dekker and John Ford's The Sun's Darling, and Thomas Middleton's A Game of Chess-all of which were produced in the theatrical season of 162324 and all of which contained references to the ``dangerous matter'' of Protestant England's relationships with the Catholic powers of the Continent: the failure of Prince Charles's marriage negotiations with Spain, the flight of King James's daughter, Elizabeth, from Catholic armies in the Palatinate, and in general the English hatred of the Papacy and its great defender, Spain. In such critical times the censors would have been especially watchful, and Limon notes particular instances where censorship affected the plays. The work is authoritative. It is generally well written and readable, and the notes, bibliography, and index are extensive and valuable. The book is of rather high quality, but the small print and the lack of illustrations make it less attractive than it could be. The study will be of interest only for specialists in Stuart literature and history.-H.L. Ford, North Texas State University
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, February 1987
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Description for Bookstore
Dr Limon examines a group of plays from 1623-1624, which allude to contemporary political issues. They seem to be components of a propaganda campaign for Prince Charles and the Duke of Buckingham. This book demonstrates how the plays obtained a censor's licence and also managed to convey appropriate political messages.
Main Description
This book is a study of a group of plays (Neptune's Triumph, The Life of the Duchess of Suffolk, The Bondman, The Sun's Darling, and A Game at Chesse) which appeared during one theatrical season in London in 1623-1624. These plays all allude in various ways to contemporary political issues, and Dr Limon shows how it is possible to treat them as components of a propaganda campaign designed to promote the cause of a particular faction, led by Prince Charles and the Duke of Buckingham, in the court of James I. The campaign opposed James' peaceful initiatives, which included an attempt to marry Charles to the Spanish Infanta. It was a period of severe censorship, and the playwrights engaged in the campaign had to be careful on the one hand to obtain the censor's licence (plays were often suppressed as 'dangerous matter') and on the other to convey appropriate political messages. The book demonstrates how this was managed, and proceeds to investigate the relationship between literature, politics and censorship in general.
Main Description
This book is a study of a group of plays (Neptune's Triumph, The Life of the Duchess of Suffolk, The Bondman, The Sun's Darling, and A Game at Chesse) which appeared during one theatrical season in London in 1623/24. These plays all allude in various ways to contemporary political issues, and Dr Limon shows how it is possible to treat them as components of a propaganda campaign designed to promote the cause of a particular faction, led by Prince Charles and the Duke of Buckingham, in the court of James I. The campaign opposed James's peaceful initiatives, which included an attempt to marry Charles to the Spanish Infanta. It was a period of severe censorship, and the playwrights engaged in the campaign had to be careful on the one hand to obtain the censor's licence (plays were often suppressed as 'dangerous matter') and on the other to convey appropriate political messages. The book demonstrates how this was managed, and proceeds to investigate the relationship between literature, politics and censorship in general.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgements
Introduction
The matter of Prince Charles's return
The matter of the King and Queen of Bohemia
The matter of war
The matter of Spain
Conclusion
Chronological table
Notes
Bibliography
Index
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

This information is provided by a service that aggregates data from review sources and other sources that are often consulted by libraries, and readers. The University does not edit this information and merely includes it as a convenience for users. It does not warrant that reviews are accurate. As with any review users should approach reviews critically and where deemed necessary should consult multiple review sources. Any concerns or questions about particular reviews should be directed to the reviewer and/or publisher.

  link to old catalogue

Report a problem