Catalogue


"We were prepared for the possibility of death" : Freedom Riders in the South, 1961.
imprint
Farmington Hills, Mich. : Gale, a part of Cengage Learning, 2010.
description
1 online resource (4,285 images).
format(s)
Journal
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series title
series title
imprint
Farmington Hills, Mich. : Gale, a part of Cengage Learning, 2010.
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
general note
Date range of documents: 1961.
Reproduction of the originals from the Federal Bureau of Investigation Library.
abstract
Freedom Riders were civil rights activists who rode interstate buses into the segregated South to test the United States Supreme Court decision in Boynton volume Virginia. Boynton had outlawed racial segregation in the restaurants and waiting rooms in terminals serving buses that crossed state lines. Five years prior to the Boynton ruling, the Interstate Commerce Commission had issued a ruling in Sarah Keys volume Carolina Coach Company that had explicitly denounced the Plessy volume Ferguson doctrine of separate but equal in interstate bus travel, but the ICC had failed to enforce its own ruling, and thus Jim Crow travel laws remained in force throughout the South. The Freedom Riders set out to challenge this status quo by riding various forms of public transportation in the South to challenge local laws or customs that enforced segregation. The Freedom Rides, and the violent reactions they provoked, bolstered the credibility of the Civil Rights Movement and called national attention to the violent disregard for the law that was used to enforce segregation in the southern United States. Riders were arrested for trespassing, unlawful assembly, and violating state and local Jim Crow laws, along with other alleged offenses.
catalogue key
12243136

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