Catalogue


Women, marriage and property in wealthy landed families in Ireland, 1750-1850 [electronic resource] /
Deborah Wilson.
imprint
Manchester ; New York : Manchester University Press ; New York : distributed in the United States exclusively by Palgrave Macmillan, 2009.
description
xiv, 233 p. ; 25 cm.
ISBN
0719077982, 9780719077982
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Manchester ; New York : Manchester University Press ; New York : distributed in the United States exclusively by Palgrave Macmillan, 2009.
isbn
0719077982
9780719077982
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
catalogue key
12224886
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [220]-229) and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Deborah Wilson completed her PhD at Queen's University Belfast, where she is now a librarian
Reviews
Review Quotes
This is a worthy first book that will, hopefully, stimulate others to broaden the template of engagement with marriage, the law, family and property in history.Irish Economic and Social History, volume (xxxviii, 2011)
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Summaries
Main Description
Until recently, women featured in the historiography of the landed class in Ireland either as bearers of assets to advantageous matches or as potential drains on family estates. Drawing on a range of sources from the papers of landed families, this book provides fresh insights into the place of these women. Looking at women's experiences of property and power in twenty landed families between 1750 and 1850, and outlining the statutory developments that impacted upon the distribution of family property in Ireland, Wilson considers how women were provided for and examines the legal, social and familial factors that influenced the experience elite women had of property. Individual examples demonstrate the similarities and differences between women in this class, and illustrate how the experience women had of property in this period was more complex than their legal and social status might suggest. This book will appeal to scholars in the fields of Irish history, gender and women's studies.
Main Description
Until recently, women featured in the historiography of the landed class in Ireland either as bearers of assets to advantageous matches or as potential drains on family estates. Drawing on a range of sources from the papers of landed families, this book provides fresh insights into the place of these women. Looking at women#146;s experiences of property and power in twenty landed families between 1750 and 1850, and outlining the statutory developments that impacted upon the distribution of family property in Ireland, Wilson considers how women were provided for and examines the legal, social and familial factors that influenced the experience elite women had of property. Individual examples demonstrate the similarities and differences between women in this class, and illustrate how the experience women had of property in this period was more complex than their legal and social status might suggest. This book will appeal to scholars in the fields of Irish history, gender and women#146;s studies.
Main Description
Until recently, women featured in the historiography of the landed class in Ireland either as bearers of assets to advantageous matches or as potential drains on family estates as a result of long widowhoods. Drawing on a range of sources from the papers of landed families, including settlements, wills and personal correspondence, Deborah Wilson challenges established notions and provides fresh insight into the place of these women. This fascinating study seeks to contribute to existing historiography by looking beyond the dynastic and economic concerns that dominate the current history of the Irish elite. It looks at women's experiences of property and power in twenty landed families between 1750 and 1850, and outlines the statutory developments that impacted upon the distribution of family property in Ireland. Wilson considers how women were provided for by family settlements and examines the legal, social and familial factors that influenced the experience elite women had of property. Individual examples are employed to demonstrate the similarities and differences between women in this class, and to illustrate how the experience women had of property in this period was more complex than their legal and social status might suggest. This book will appeal to scholars in the fields of Irish History, Gender and Women's Studies, and to anyone with an interest in the history of Irish landed families. Book jacket.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgementsp. vii
List of tablesp. ix
Abbreviationsp. xi
Glossary of legal terminologyp. xiii
Introductionp. 1
Women, marriage and statute law in Irelandp. 19
Provisions made for women and children in family settlementsp. 39
Women and legal guardianshipp. 87
Single women and propertyp. 110
Married women and propertyp. 127
Widows and propertyp. 154
Conclusionp. 179
Appendicesp. 184
Select bibliographyp. 220
Indexp. 230
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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