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Major Tudor authors : a bio-bibliographical critical sourcebook /
edited by Alan Hager.
imprint
Westport, Conn. : Greenwood Press, 1997.
description
xii, 514 p.
ISBN
0313294364 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
added author
imprint
Westport, Conn. : Greenwood Press, 1997.
isbn
0313294364 (alk. paper)
local note
AYV-9963
catalogue key
1206587
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 1997-11:
Hagar's bibliography fills a gap in the reference literature. The entries review their subjects' critical reception and "conclude with a statement on the author's relative significance in the Tudor era and in world literature." Entries contain bibliographies that list by date editions of an author's primary works and in some instances manuscripts, followed by an unannotated alphabetically arranged list of articles and books about the author. Entries vary in length and quality, as is inevitable in the case of a product by many hands. Unfortunately the preface fails to make clear the scope of the entries. Some entries are disappointingly short, and opportunities appear to have been missed. Less space (perhaps none) should have been devoted to Shakespeare and Spenser, both of whom are well served with numerous reference sources, and more to figures such as Frances Beaumont; Mary Sidney Herbert, Countess of Pembroke; John Lyly; John Ross; and James Sandford. Nicely produced with a solid binding for reference use; recommended with reservations. W. Baker; Northern Illinois University
Reviews
Review Quotes
'œMajor Tudor Authors is the type of book that every library should possess. It is a source of abundant information...'' Christian Library Journal
'œ[O]verall Major Tudor Authors is another major, excellent...book from Greenwood, a publisher to be treasured.'' Chronique
'œThe subjects range from the familiar and famous, such as Shakespeare, Marlowe, and Thomas More, to the lesser known, such as Anne Askew and Richard Pace....Thoughtful, well-prepared, compact, and easy-to-use, this reference tool is recommended for large public and academic libraries.'' Booklist/Reference Books Bulletin
"Alan Hager has put together a rich sourcebook on biographical and bibliographical materials needed for an understanding of the Renaissance. The wealth of figures represented--Aretino, Bacon, Castiglione, Erasmus, Gascoigne, Hoby, Puttenham, Tyndale, and many others--attests to the variety and accomplishment of the period, while the equally rich assortment of scholars assembled here gives lively testimony to the healthy and interdisciplinary state of Renaissance studies. This is a handy and elegant book." - David Bevington Phyllis Fay Horton Professor in the Humanities University of Chicago
This item was reviewed in:
Booklist, October 1997
Choice, November 1997
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Long Description
The Tudor era (1485-1603) was one of the most culturally significant periods in history. Under three generations of Tudor rulers, the era witnessed the advent of humanism, the birth of the Reformation, and the rise of the British Empire. The literature of the period is marked by complexity of thought and form and reflects the political, religious, and cultural changes of the era. This reference book surveys the literature of Tudor England. Included are alphabetically arranged entries for nearly 100 authors who wrote between 1485 and 1603. Some figures covered are widely taught, such as Shakespeare, Donne, and Spenser. Others are less well known, such as Edward Fairfax and Abraham Fraunce. The work includes entries for notable women writers of the period, many of whom have been neglected until recent years. Also included are entries for continental writers such as Ariosto, Tasso, Calvin, and Erasmus, whose writings were influential in England. Entries are written by expert contributors and contain valuable bibliographies of primary and secondary sources. Included are entries for nearly 100 people who wrote between 1485 and 1603. The entries are written by expert contributors and are arranged alphabetically to facilitate use. Some of the authors profiled are major canonical figures, such as Shakespeare, Spenser, and Donne. But the volume also includes a significant number of entries for women writers, whose work has been unjustly disregarded until recent years. While most of the authors were from England, the volume contains entries on figures such as Erasmus, who, though born in another country, wrote important works in England, and on writers such as Machiavelli, Calvin, Ariosto, and Tasso, whose works were almost immediately adopted, translated, or otherwise made part of Tudor culture. Each entry provides a brief biography, which is followed by a discussion of major works and themes, a review of the author's critical reception, and a bibliography of primary and secondary sources.
Long Description
The Tudor era (1485-1603) was one of the most culturally significant periods in history. Under three generations of Tudor rulers, the era witnessed the advent of humanism, the birth of the Reformation, and the rise of the British Empire. The literature of the period is marked by complexity of thought and form and reflects the political, religious, and cultural changes of the era. Within slightly more than a century, literature in English evolved from late medieval, mostly in Scotland, to high renaissance, mostly in England. Classical myth merged with Christian teaching, continental thinkers influenced English culture, and developments in science fostered the growth of early modern civilization. This reference book is a guide to the rich and diverse literature of Tudor England. Included are entries for nearly 100 people who wrote between 1485 and 1603. The entries are written by expert contributors and are arranged alphabetically to facilitate use. Some of the authors profiled are major canonical figures, such as Shakespeare, Spenser, and Donne. But the volume also includes a significant number of entries for women writers, whose work has been unjustly disregarded until recent years. While most of the authors were from England, the volume contains entries on figures such as Erasmus, who, though born in another country, wrote important works in England, and on writers such as Machiavelli, Calvin, Ariosto, and Tasso, whose works were almost immediately adopted, translated, or otherwise made part of Tudor culture. Each entry provides a brief biography, which is followed by a discussion of major works and themes, a review of the author's critical reception, and a bibliography of primary and secondary sources.
Unpaid Annotation
Expert contributors profile the achievements of nearly 100 authors who wrote between 1485 and 1603.
Table of Contents
Preface
The Tudor
Authors Index
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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