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The Scottish Enlightenment [electronic resource] : race, gender, and the limits of progress /
Silvia Sebastiani ; translated by Jeremy Carden.
edition
1st ed.
imprint
New York : Palgrave Macmillan, 2013.
description
xiv, 255 p. ; 25 cm.
ISBN
0230114911 (alk. paper), 9780230114913 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
More Details
imprint
New York : Palgrave Macmillan, 2013.
isbn
0230114911 (alk. paper)
9780230114913 (alk. paper)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
language note
Translated from Italian.
catalogue key
12030611
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 291-246) and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Silvia Sebastiani is Matre de Confrences (Associate Professor) at the cole des Hautes tudes en Sciences Socials in Paris.
Reviews
Review Quotes
'The most important study of the eighteenth-century Scottish historians since Colin Kidd's Subverting Scotland's Past ... It is a book which establishes Sebastiani as one of the leading European intellectual historians of her generation.' - John Robertson, University of Cambridge, UK 'Sebastiani's provocative and persuasive contribution to studies of Enlightenment thought demonstrates the centrality of arguments about progress and their complex connection to notions of national character, race, gender and nation.' - John Brewer, Eli and Edye Broad Professor of Humanities and Social Sciences, California Institute of Technology, USA 'Silvia Sebastiani's study offers important new insights into the Scottish Enlightenment that both deepen and defamiliarize our understanding of the progressive histories that emanated from eighteenth-century Scotland.' - Karen O'Brien, Pro-Vice-Chancellor for Education, University of Birmingham, UK 'Silvia Sebastiani teases out the complex relationship between progress, civilization, and human difference in the Scottish Enlightenment ... She adds immeasurably to our understanding of the eighteenth-century 'Science of Man' and its legacies to modern thought.' - Barbara Taylor, Professor of Humanities, Queen Mary, University of London, UK 'It is real pleasure to see Silvia Sebastiani's fine study in an English edition. Every student of the Scottish Enlightenment will benefit from a book that provides such lucid commentary on many central issues of this critical period.' - Mark Salber Phillips, Professor of History, Carleton University, Ottawa, Canada 'In this well-researched, insightful book, Silvia Sebastiani delivers the first extensive analysis of race and gender in Scottish Enlightenment thought. In the process, she deftly investigates previously under-explored aspects of eighteenth-century debates.' - Richard B. Sher, author of The Enlightenment and the Book
To come.
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Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
This title examines how the difference between monogenist and polygenist accounts of the origin of the human race was reflected in, and helped to shape, Scottish Enlightenment accounts of society's progress through historical stages.
Description for Bookstore
Examines the difference between monogenist and polygenist accounts of the origin of the human race
Long Description
The Scottish Enlightenment shaped a new conception of history as a gradual and universal progress from savagery to civil society. Whereas women emancipated themselves from the yoke of male-masters, men in turn acquired polite manners and became civilized. Such a conception, however, presents problematic questions: why were the Americans still savage? Why was it that the Europeans only had completed all the stages of the historic process? Could modern societies escape the destiny of earlier empires and avoid decadence? Was there a limit beyond which women's influence might result in dehumanization? The Scottish Enlightenment's legacy for modernity emerges here as a two-faced Janus, an unresolved tension between universalism and hierarchy, progress and the limits of progress.
Long Description
The Scottish Enlightenment's model of history was a universal progression from savagery to civil society, whereby women emancipated themselves and men left barbarism behind. Such a conception, however, elided problematic questions: Why were the Americans still 'savage'? Why had only Europe completed this process? Could modern societies escape the decadence of earlier empires? Now available for the first time in English, this definitive study teases out the contradictions and complexities of the Scottish Enlightenment, showing how its unresolved tensions between universalism and hierarchy, progress and reaction, defined its contribution to modernity.
Main Description
The Scottish Enlightenment shaped a new conception of history as a gradual and universal progress from savagery to civil society. Whereas women emancipated themselves from the yoke of male-masters, men in turn acquired polite manners and became civilized.
Main Description
The Scottish Enlightenment's model of history was a universal progression from savagery to civil society, whereby women emancipated themselves and men left barbarism behind. Such a conception, however, elided problematic questions: Why were the Americans still "savage"? Why had only Europe completed this process? Could modern societies escape the decadence of earlier empires? Now available for the first time in English, this definitive study teases out the contradictions and complexities of the Scottish Enlightenment, showing how its unresolved tensions between universalism and hierarchy, progress and reaction, defined its contribution to modernity. Book jacket.
Table of Contents
A Note on Terminologyp. xi
Acknowledgmentsp. xiii
Introduction: The Scottish Enlightenment as Historiographic Problemp. 1
Hume versus Montesquieu: Race against Climatep. 23
The Natural History of Humankind and the Natural History of Manp. 45
Ignoble Savages: A Blank in the History of the Speciesp. 73
Universal Prerogatives of Humankindp. 103
Measures of Civilization: Women, Races, and Progressp. 133
Conclusionp. 163
Notesp. 173
Bibliographyp. 219
Indexp. 247
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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