Catalogue


Ruling, resources and religion in China [electronic resource] : managing the multiethnic state in the 21st century /
Elizabeth Van Wie Davis, Colorado School of Mines, USA.
imprint
Houndmills, Basingstroke, Hampshire : Palgrave Macmillan, 2013.
description
xiv, 182 pages : illustrations, map ; 23 cm
ISBN
9781137033833 (hardback)
format(s)
Book
More Details
imprint
Houndmills, Basingstroke, Hampshire : Palgrave Macmillan, 2013.
isbn
9781137033833 (hardback)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
contents note
Machine generated contents note: -- Ruling & Governance -- Leadership & Resources -- Regional Challenges for Resources and Religion -- Tibet Question -- Uyghur Question -- Ruling, Resources and Religion -- Outcomes.
abstract
"China is not an easy country to rule: it is experiencing rapid growth and with it rapid social change. Resources and religion are two of the most difficult of its challenges, and their combination with ethnicity is not unique to China. It may well be one of the major underlying currents of the 21st century, and is present throughout Asia--with the Baloch of Pakistan, the Kurds of Iraq and Turkey, and the Timorese of the former island of East Timor in Indonesia, now Timor-Lest. In all these nations, as in China, ethnic identity, often united with religious differences, is driven by the presence of valuable resources to create a nationalism with economic underpinnings. With China, however, the outcome is vital, as how it copes with the pressures for good governance with the Asian economic model, treats its ethnic minorities under scrutiny, and gathers resources to fuel its dynamic economy impacts us all"--
catalogue key
12030534
 
Includes bibliographical references (pages 166-176) and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Elizabeth Van Wie Davis is Director and Professor of Liberal Arts and International Studies at the Colorado School of Mines, USA.
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
China is growing in importance to the economies and governments of the world, and it has been run by men with very different ideas. How China copes with the pressures for good governance with the Asian economic model, treats its ethnic minorities under scrutiny, and gathers resources to fuel its dynamic economy, impacts us all.
Description for Bookstore
Elizabeth Van Wie Davis examines the new 21st century environment for governing a multi-ethnic state and gathering sufficient resources for development
Long Description
China is not an easy country to rule: it is experiencing rapid growth and with it rapid social change. Resources and religion are two of the most difficult of its challenges, and their combination with ethnicity is not unique to China. It may well be one of the major underlying currents of the 21st century and is present throughout Asia-with the Baloch of Pakistan, the Kurds of Iraq and Turkey, and the Timorese of the former island of East Timor in Indonesia, now Timor-Lest. In all these nations, as in China, ethnic identity, often united with religious differences, is driven by the presence of valuable resources to create a nationalism with economic underpinnings. However, as Van Wie Davis shows, with China the outcome is vital, as how it copes with the pressures for good governance with the Asian economic model, treats its ethnic minorities under scrutiny, and gathers resources to fuel its dynamic economy impacts us all.
Main Description
China is not an easy country to rule: it is experiencing rapid growth and with it rapid social change. Resources and religion are two of the most difficult of its challenges, and their combination with ethnicity is not unique to China. It may well be one of the major underlying currents of the 21st century, and is present throughout Asia - with the Baloch of Pakistan, the Kurds of Iraq and Turkey, and the Timorese of the former island of East Timor in Indonesia, now Timor-Lest. In all these nations, as in China, ethnic identity, often united with religious differences, is driven by the presence of valuable resources to create a nationalism with economic underpinnings. With China, however, the outcome is vital, as how it copes with the pressures for good governance with the Asian economic model, treats its ethnic minorities under scrutiny, and gathers resources to fuel its dynamic economy impacts us all.
Main Description
China is not an easy country to rule: it is experiencing rapid growth and with it rapid social change. Resources and religion are two of the most difficult of its challenges, and their combination with ethnicity is not unique to China. It may well be one of the major underlying currents of the 21st century, and is present throughout Asiawith the Baloch of Pakistan, the Kurds of Iraq and Turkey, and the Timorese of the former island of East Timor in Indonesia, now Timor-Lest. In all these nations, as in China, ethnic identity, often united with religious differences, is driven by the presence of valuable resources to create a nationalism with economic underpinnings. With China, however, the outcome is vital, as how it copes with the pressures for good governance with the Asian economic model, treats its ethnic minorities under scrutiny, and gathers resources to fuel its dynamic economy impacts us all.
Table of Contents
List of Mapsp. viii
Prefacep. ix
Acknowledgmentsp. xiii
Introductionp. 1
Ruling and Governancep. 13
Leadership and Resourcesp. 33
Regional Challenges for Resources and Religionp. 53
Tibet Questionp. 74
Uyghur Questionp. 94
Ruling, Resources and Religionp. 113
Outcomesp. 129
Notesp. 144
Bibliographyp. 166
Indexp. 177
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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