Catalogue

COVID-19: Updates on library services and operations.

Moral panics, the media and the law in early modern England [electronic resource] /
edited by David Lemmings and Claire Walker.
imprint
Houndmills, Basingstoke, Hampshire ; New York : Palgrave Macmillan, 2009.
description
xi, 279 p. : ill. ; 23 cm.
ISBN
0230527329 (alk. paper), 9780230527324 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
More Details
imprint
Houndmills, Basingstoke, Hampshire ; New York : Palgrave Macmillan, 2009.
isbn
0230527329 (alk. paper)
9780230527324 (alk. paper)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
contents note
Introduction: law and order, moral panics, and early modern England / David Lemmings -- The concept of the moral panic: an historico-sociological positioning / David Rowe -- 'This newe army of satan': the Jesuit mission and the formation of public opinion in Elizabethan England / Alexandra Walsham -- Cross-dressing and pamphleteering in early seventeenth-century London / Anna Bayman -- Fear made flesh: the English witch-panic of 1645-7 / Malcolm Gaskill -- 'A sainct in shewe, a devill in deede': moral panics and anti-Puritanism in seventeenth-century England / Tim Harris -- 'Remember Justice Godfrey': the popish plot and the construction of panic in seventeenth-century media / Claire Walker -- The dark side of Enlightenment: the London Journal, moral panics, and the law in the eighteenth century / David Lemmings -- Forgers and forgery: severity and social identity in eighteenth-century England / Randall McGowen -- 'How frail are lovers vows, and dicers oaths': gaming, governing and moral panic in Britain, 1781-1782 / Donna T. Andrew -- A moral panic in eighteenth-century London? The 'monster' and the press / Cindy McCreery -- The British Jacobins: folk devils in the age of counter-revolution? / Michael T. Davis -- Conclusion: moral panics, law and the transformation of the public sphere in early modern England / David Lemmings.
abstract
"This book explores and exemplifies some of the subtler links between opinion, governance and law in early modern England by investigating moral panics. Modern media-driven 'law and order' panics may have originated in eighteenth-century England, with the development of the press and government sensibility to opinion, but there were earlier panics about witchcraft and popery. Essays by an experienced team of scholars discuss broadly episodes of moral panic before and after 1689, and consider their implications for changes in governance"--Provided by publisher.
catalogue key
12028933
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
This is an exploration of links between opinion and governance in early modern England, studying moral panics about crime, sex and belief. Hypothesizing that media-driven panics proliferated in the 1700s, with the development of newspapers and government sensibility to opinion, it also considers earlier panics about cross-dressing and witchcraft.
Description for Bookstore
A study of important moral panics occurring in Early Modern England as a means to chart the changing connections between public opinion, governance and law in early modern England
Long Description
A fascinating study of moral panics about religion, women, witchcraft, revolution, crime, and corruption, ranging from the late seventeenth century to the end of the eighteenth, Moral Panics, the Media and the Law in Early Modern England considers whether media-driven 'law and order' panics proliferated after 1700, with the development of the newspaper press and heightened sensibility to crime and the anonymity of London, as well as the availability of legislative solutions from regular law-producing parliaments. Together the essays reveal the importance of opinion as an influence on government throughout the period, but they also nuance our understanding of the public sphere. Whereas sixteenth and early seventeenth-century panics imply a political culture where involving the people in affairs of state was exceptional, by the mid-eighteenth century media-savvy governments routinely sought to manipulate public opinion to legitimize their rule. Moreover, the popular discourses informing moral panics shifted from a fundamentalist religious mindset of heaven against hell to concerns about social problems such as crime and the corrupting effects of commerce. By 1800 the reading public was clearly much less deferential and more demanding of government: and the rule of law depended on extended public discussion, even though much of it took the form of sensationalist reporting and panic.
Library of Congress Summary
"This book explores and exemplifies some of the subtler links between opinion, governance and law in early modern England by investigating moral panics. Modern media-driven 'law and order' panics may have originated in eighteenth-century England, with the development of the press and government sensibility to opinion, but there were earlier panics about witchcraft and popery. Essays by an experienced team of scholars discuss broadly episodes of moral panic before and after 1689, and consider their implications for changes in governance"--Provided by publisher.
Main Description
This book explores and exemplifies some of the subtler links between opinion, governance and law in early modern England by investigating moral panics. Modern media-driven 'law and order' panics may have originated in eighteenth-century England, with the development of the press and government sensibility to opinion, but there were earlier panics about witchcraft and popery. Essays by an experienced team of scholars discuss broadly episodes of moral panic before and after 1689, and consider their implications for changes in governance.
Main Description
This book explores and exemplifies some of the subtler links between opinion, governance and law in early modern England by investigating moral panics. Modern media-driven 'law and order' panics may have originated in eighteenth-century England, with the development of the press and government sensibility to opinion, but there were earlier panics about witchcraft and popery. Essays by an experienced team of scholars discuss broadly episodes of moral panic before and after 1689, and considertheir implications for changes in governance.
Main Description
This book explores and exemplifies some of the subtler links between opinion, governance and law in early modern England by investigating moral panics. Modern media-driven ‘law and order’ panics may have originated in eighteenth-century England, with the development of the press and government sensibility to opinion, but there were earlier panics about witchcraft and popery. Essays by an experienced team of scholars discuss broadly episodes of moral panic before and after 1689, and consider their implications for changes in governance.
Table of Contents
List of Illustrationsp. vii
Acknowledgementsp. viii
Notes on Contributorsp. ix
Note on Works Cited in Endnotesp. xi
Introduction: Law and Order, Moral Panics, and Early Modern Englandp. 1
The Concept of the Moral Panic: An Historico-Sociological Positioningp. 22
'This Newe Army of Satan': The Jesuit Mission and the Formation of Public Opinion in Elizabethan Englandp. 41
Cross-dressing and Pamphleteering in Early Seventeenth-Century Londonp. 63
Fear made Flesh: The English Witch-Panic of 1645-7p. 78
'A sainct in shewe, a Devill in deede': Moral Panics and Anti-Puritanism in Seventeenth-Century Englandp. 97
'Remember Justice Godfrey': The Popish Plot and the Construction of Panic in Seventeenth-Century Mediap. 117
The Dark Side of Enlightenment: The London Journal, Moral Panics, and the Law in the Eighteenth Centuryp. 139
Forgers and Forgery: Severity and Social Identity in Eighteenth-Century Englandp. 157
'How frail are Lovers vows, and Dicers oaths': Gaming, Governing and Moral Panic in Britain, 1781-1782p. 176
A Moral Panic in Eighteenth-Century London? The 'Monster' and the Pressp. 195
The British Jacobins: Folk devils in the Age of Counter-Revolution?p. 221
Conclusion: Moral Panics, Law and the Transformation of the Public Sphere in Early Modern Englandp. 267
Indexp. 267
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

This information is provided by a service that aggregates data from review sources and other sources that are often consulted by libraries, and readers. The University does not edit this information and merely includes it as a convenience for users. It does not warrant that reviews are accurate. As with any review users should approach reviews critically and where deemed necessary should consult multiple review sources. Any concerns or questions about particular reviews should be directed to the reviewer and/or publisher.

  link to old catalogue

Report a problem