Catalogue


Mau Mau in Harlem? [electronic resource] : the U.S. and the liberation of Kenya /
by Gerald Horne.
edition
1st ed.
imprint
New York, NY : Palgrave Macmillan, c2009.
description
x, 323 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0230615635
format(s)
Book
More Details
imprint
New York, NY : Palgrave Macmillan, c2009.
isbn
0230615635
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
contents note
Into Africa -- A British colony? -- A dangerous neighborhood -- Catastrophe looms -- Race war? -- Colonialism confronted -- Mau Mau looms -- State of emergency 20 -- "Mau Mau" -- The U.S. Arms the settlers? -- "Mau Mau"?to Little Rock -- Labor will rule? -- Working class hero? -- A new frontier? In Africa? -- Colonialism retreating? -- Liberation looms -- Mau Mau in Harlem.
catalogue key
12028639
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Gerald Horne is John and Rebecca Moores Professor of African-American History at the University of Houston. He has published over two dozen books, including From the Barrel of a Gun: The United States and the War Against Zimbabwe, 1965-1980
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2010-06-01:
The few Americans at the time who had heard about Kenya and the Mau Mau insurgency there in the mid-20th century interpreted the latter as a terrorist outrage rather than the proto-independence movement it was. In this detailed but fascinating account of the steady contact between the Kenya colony (later, nation) and the US, Horne (Univ. of Houston) demonstrates a closer relationship between the two governments than that of which most Americans are aware. On the one side stood Teddy Roosevelt, Churchill, and Hemingway, among others, extolling in one form or another the existence of what was akin to an apartheid system. On the other stood some of the giants of the African American community, including Booker T. Washington, W. E. B. Du Bois, Paul Robeson, and Ralph Bunche. Later, as British power and colonialism began to wane, some Americans of a more "liberal" persuasion, such as the Rockefellers and Kennedys, began to take a low-key interest in Kenya, which eventually resulted in a number of Kenyans coming to the US as students. These included Barack Obama senior, thus setting in motion global winds of change still playing out. Summing Up: Highly recommended. Upper-division undergraduates and above. W. Arens Stony Brook University
Reviews
Review Quotes
"This is a fast-moving, readable account -- stunningly well-researched in a wide range of archives on three continents -- of hitherto little-known connections between the United States in general, and African-Americans in particular, with the history of the colonization and then liberation of Kenya."--John Lonsdale, Fellow of Trinity College and Emeritus University Professor of Modern African History, University of Cambridge
"This is a fast-moving, readable account--stunningly well-researched in a wide range of archives on three continents--of hitherto little-known connections between the United States in general, and African-Americans in particular, with the history of the colonization and then liberation of Kenya." --John Lonsdale, Fellow of Trinity College and Emeritus University Professor of Modern African History, University of Cambridge"In this detailed but fascinating account of the steady contact between the Kenya colony (later, nation) and the US, Horne demonstrates a closer relationship between the two governments than that of which most Americans are aware...Highly recommended." --CHOICE
"This is a fast-moving, readable account--stunningly well-researched in a wide range of archives on three continents--of hitherto little-known connections between the United States in general, and African-Americans in particular, with the history of the colonization and then liberation of Kenya." John Lonsdale, Fellow of Trinity College and Emeritus University Professor of Modern African History, University of Cambridge "In this detailed but fascinating account of the steady contact between the Kenya colony (later, nation) and the US, Horne demonstrates a closer relationship between the two governments than that of which most Americans are aware...Highly recommended." W. Arens, CHOICE
"This is a fast-moving, readable account - stunningly well-researched in a wide range of archives on three continents - of hitherto little-known connections between the United States in general, and African-Americans in particular, with the history of the colonization and then liberation of Kenya." - John Lonsdale, Fellow of Trinity College and Emeritus University Professor of Modern African History, University of Cambridge "In this detailed but fascinating account of the steady contact between the Kenya colony (later, nation) and the US, Horne demonstrates a closer relationship between the two governments than that of which most Americans are aware...Highly recommended." - W. Arens, CHOICE 'In this book, Gerald Horne offers a compelling transnational history of the intertwined struggles of African Americans for civil rights and of Kenyans for independence from British colonial rule. Based on extensive research in archival and print sources, it is impossible to capture in a short review the rich narrative Horne offers.' - American Historical Review
"This is a fast-moving, readable account - stunningly well-researched in a wide range of archives on three continents - of hitherto little-known connections between the United States in general, and African-Americans in particular, with the history of the colonization and then liberation of Kenya." - John Lonsdale, Fellow of Trinity College and Emeritus University Professor of Modern African History, University of Cambridge "In this detailed but fascinating account of the steady contact between the Kenya colony (later, nation) and the US, Horne demonstrates a closer relationship between the two governments than that of which most Americans are aware...Highly recommended." - W. Arens, CHOICE 'In this book, Gerald Horne offers a compelling transnational history of the intertwined struggles of African Americans for civil rights and of Kenyans for independence from British colonial rule. Based on extensive research in archival and print sources, it is impossible to capture in a short review the rich narrative Horne offers.' - American Historical Review 'As a preeminent scholar of African American history and politics, Gerald Horne has tirelessly crafted an impressively prolific body of work. By illuminating the historical and ideological forces that brought Kenya and the United States together, Mau Mau in Harlem? is another example of his laudable scholarly output. Horne's book will be an indispensible resource on this subject for years to come.' - The Journal of American History
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, June 2010
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Description for Bookstore
Based on archival research on three continents, this book addresses the interpenetration of two closely related movements: the struggle against white supremacy and Jim Crow in the U.S., and the struggle against similar forces and for national liberation in Colonial Kenya.
Description for Bookstore
Horne is a leading figure in the field and his inclusion will also be a major asset in attracting future authors to the series
Long Description
From the inception of a British colony in Kenya in the late 19th century, the United States was intimately involved in its development. Simultaneously, African-Americans too were attracted to Kenya early on, not least because the apparent "black-white" conflict there seemed to mirror what they were experiencing in the U.S. Thus, when the African majority revolted in the early 1950s - termed "Mau Mau" - occurred at a time when African-Americans were surging toward equality. The struggle in Kenya was coming to symbolize Africa's struggle for freedom from European colonialism. It was thought that lessons could be learned from Kenya, symbolized when Malcolm X suggested a "Mau Mau in Harlem" might be necessary. Simultaneously, John F. Kennedy was among those who backed a campaign to bring Kenyans to the U.S. for higher education - included among these students was Barack H. Obama, Sr., who was brought to the University of Hawaii. Based on extensive archival research in the U.S., the U.K. and Kenya, this book not only sheds light on the historical forces that created a U.S. President, but also illuminates the unshakeable bonds that historically have conjoined Black America, Africa, and the United States as a whole.
Main Description
From the inception of a British colony in Kenya in the late 19th century, the United States was intimately involved in its development. Simultaneously, African-Americans too were attracted to Kenya early on, not least because the apparent "black-white" conflict there seemed to mirror what they were experiencing in the U.S. Thus, when the African majority revolted in the early 1950s termed "Mau Mau" occurred at a time when African-Americans were surging toward equality. The struggle in Kenya was coming to symbolize Africa's struggle for freedom from European colonialism. It was thought that lessons could be learned from Kenya, symbolized when Malcolm X suggested a "Mau Mau in Harlem" might be necessary. Simultaneously, John F. Kennedy was among those who backed a campaign to bring Kenyans to the U.S. for higher educationincluded among these students was Barack H. Obama, Sr., who was brought to the University of Hawaii. Based on extensive archival research in the U.S., the U.K. and Kenya, this book not only sheds light on the historical forces that created a U.S. President, but also illuminates the unshakeable bonds that historically have conjoined Black America, Africa, and the United States as a whole.
Main Description
From the inception of a the British colony in Kenya in the late 19th nineteenth century, the United States has been intimately involved in the country's development. African-Americans were particularly attracted to Kenya from early on, not least because the apparent "black-white" conflict there, while symbolizing Africa's struggle for freedom from European colonialism, also seemed to mirror what they were experiencing in the U.S. The struggle in Kenya symbolized Africa's struggle for freedom from European colonialism. It was thought that lessons could be learned from Kenya, demonstrated when Malcolm X proclaimed a "Mau Mau in Harlem" might be necessary. To counter Soviet propaganda that suggested that the U.S. was supportive of colonialism, John F. Kennedy was among those who backed a campaign to bring Kenyans to the U.S. for higher education included among these students was Barack H. Obama, Sr., who was brought to the University of Hawaii. Based on extensive archival research in the U.S., the U.K., and Kenya, this book not only sheds light on the historical forces that created a U.S. President but also the unshakeable bonds that historically have historically conjoined Black America, Africa, and the United States as a whole.
Main Description
From the inception of a the British colony in Kenya in the late 19th nineteenth century, the United States has been intimately involved in the country's development. African-Americans were particularly attracted to Kenya from early on, not least because the apparent "black-white" conflict there, while symbolizing Africa's struggle for freedom from European colonialism, also seemed to mirror what they were experiencing in the U.S. The struggle in Kenya symbolized Africa's struggle for freedom from European colonialism. It was thought that lessons could be learned from Kenya, demonstrated when Malcolm X proclaimed a "Mau Mau in Harlem" might be necessary. To counter Soviet propaganda that suggested that the U.S. was supportive of colonialism, John F. Kennedy was among those who backed a campaign to bring Kenyans to the U.S. for higher education - included among these students was Barack H. Obama, Sr., who was brought to the University ofHawaii. Based on extensive archival research in the U.S., the U.K., and Kenya, this book not only sheds light on the historical forces that created a U.S. President but also the unshakeable bonds that historically have historically conjoined Black America, Africa, and the United States as a whole. Horne offers important context in understanding how a man of Kenyan descent could one day occupy the White House.
Main Description
From the inception of a the British colony in Kenya in the late 19th nineteenth century, the United States has been intimately involved in the country's development. African-Americans were particularly attracted to Kenya from early on, not least because the apparent "black-white" conflict there, while symbolizing Africa's struggle for freedom from European colonialism, also seemed to mirror what they were experiencing in the U.S. The struggle in Kenya symbolized Africa's struggle for freedom from European colonialism. It was thought that lessons could be learned from Kenya, demonstrated when Malcolm X proclaimed a "Mau Mau in Harlem" might be necessary. To counter Soviet propaganda that suggested that the U.S. was supportive of colonialism, John F. Kennedy was among those who backed a campaign to bring Kenyans to the U.S. for higher education included among these students was Barack H. Obama, Sr., who was brought to the University of Hawaii. Based on extensive archival research in the U.S., the U.K., and Kenya, this book not only sheds light on the historical forces that created a U.S. President but also the unshakeable bonds that historically have historically conjoined Black America, Africa, and the United States as a whole. Horne offers important context in understanding how a man of Kenyan descent could one day occupy the White House.
Main Description
From the inception of a the British colony in Kenya in the late 19th nineteenth century, the United States has been intimately involved in the country's development. African-Americans were particularly attracted to Kenya from early on, not least because the apparent "black-white" conflict there, while symbolizing Africa's struggle for freedom from European colonialism, also seemed to mirror what they were experiencing in the U.S. The struggle in Kenya symbolized Africa's struggle for freedom from European colonialism. It was thought that lessons could be learned from Kenya, demonstrated when Malcolm X proclaimed a "Mau Mau in Harlem" might be necessary. To counter Soviet propaganda that suggested that the U.S. was supportive of colonialism, John F. Kennedy was among those who backed a campaign to bring Kenyans to the U.S. for higher education included among these students was Barack H. Obama, Sr., who was brought to the University ofHawaii. Based on extensive archival research in the U.S., the U.K., and Kenya, this book not only sheds light on the historical forces that created a U.S. President but also the unshakeable bonds that historically have historically conjoined Black America, Africa, and the United States as a whole. Horne offers important context in understanding how a man of Kenyan descent could one day occupy the White House.
Main Description
From the inception of a the British colony in Kenya in the late 19th nineteenth century, the United States has been intimately involved in the country's development. African-Americans were particularly attracted to Kenya from early on, not least because the apparent black-white conflict there, while symbolizing Africa's struggle for freedom from European colonialism, also seemed to mirror what they were experiencing in the U.S. The struggle in Kenya symbolized Africa's struggle for freedom from European colonialism. It was thought that lessons could be learned from Kenya, demonstrated when Malcolm X proclaimed a Mau Mau in Harlem might be necessary. To counter Soviet propaganda that suggested that the U.S. was supportive of colonialism, John F. Kennedy was among those who backed a campaign to bring Kenyans to the U.S. for higher education ' included among these students was Barack H. Obama, Sr., who was brought to the University of Hawaii. Based on extensive archival research in the U.S., the U.K., and Kenya, this book not only sheds light on the historical forces that created a U.S. President but also the unshakeable bonds that historically have historically conjoined Black America, Africa, and the United States as a whole. Horne offers important context in understanding how a man of Kenyan descent could one day occupy the White House.
Table of Contents
List of Figuresp. vii
List of Abbreviationsp. ix
Introductionp. 1
Into Africap. 17
A British Colony?p. 29
A Dangerous Neighborhoodp. 43
Catastrophe Loomsp. 55
Race War?p. 67
Colonialism Confrontedp. 79
Mau Mau Loomsp. 89
State of Emergencyp. 101
"Mau Mau"p. 115
The United States Arms the Settlers?p. 129
"Mau Mau"-to Little Rockp. 143
Labor Will Rule?p. 157
Working-Class Hero?p. 171
A New Frontier-in Africa?p. 183
Colonialism Retreating?p. 197
Liberation Loomsp. 211
Conclusion: Mau Mau in Harlem?p. 225
Notesp. 241
Indexp. 303
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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