Catalogue


The Hispanic world and American intellectual life, 1820-1880 [electronic resource] /
Iván Jaksić.
edition
1st ed.
imprint
New York : Palgrave Macmillan, 2007.
description
x, 256 p. ; 25 cm.
ISBN
9781403980793
format(s)
Book
More Details
imprint
New York : Palgrave Macmillan, 2007.
isbn
9781403980793
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
catalogue key
12027510
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [237]-246) and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Ivan Jaksic is Director of the Stanford University Program in Santiago, and Professor of History at the Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Chile
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2008-09-01:
Few scholars have considered the effect of Spain and Hispanic culture on the life and intellectual milieu of the US, 1820-80. Ethnocentric as Americans are (and have been), it is refreshing to discover that George Ticknor, Mary Peabody Mann, and others, including Walt Whitman and Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, developed interests in cultures "south of our borders" and across the Atlantic, incorporating a Hispanic world-view into their own. Jaksic (Pontificia Univ. Catolica de Chile; Academic Rebels in Chile, CH, Nov'89, 27-1483) suggests a "fluidity" thus existed between US and Hispanic intellectuals that reinforced a "shaping of their own country's national identity" (US) during a crucial and very specific period in history. Whitman, quoted by Jaksic, once stated that someday Americans might discover in this country "the Spanish element in our nationality"; perhaps this is occurring today. If so, it is Jaksic's work that lends itself to this reality. Readers will find Sean Wilentz's The Rise of American Democracy: Jefferson to Lincoln (CH, Mar'06, 43-4243) a worthwhile complement to Jaksic's book. Summing Up: Highly recommended. Upper-division undergraduates and above. P. D. Travis Texas Woman's University
Reviews
Review Quotes
"This path-breaking book is the first comprehensive narrative and analysis of early U.S. scholars of Hispanic history and literature. The author opens new windows on the migration of ideas into and out of the U.S."--James Turner, Professor of the Humanities, University of Notre Dame "Iván Jaksic's extraordinary study of a generation of mid-nineteenth century New Englanders fascinated with Spain and its satellites across the Atlantic sets new standards in the examination of the origins of Hispanism as a discipline in the English-speaking world. Meet, among others, Mary Mann, Sarmiento's translator and unofficial publicity agent; W.H. Prescott, a warrior in spite of his blindness; and Washington Irving, whose intellectual thefts are still unchallenged. This un-Metaphysical Club still defines the way we misconceive Hispanic civilization in the United States."--Ilan Stavans, Lewis-Sebring Professor of Latin American and Latino Culture, Amherst College, and author of The Hispanic Condition and Spanglish "This is unquestionably the best study on Spain's place in the imaginary of nineteenth century America. Ranging widely over the work of such luminaries as Washington Irving, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, George Ticknor, William Hickling Prescott, and a bit of Melville as well, the scholarship is original and the presentation superb. A page-turner from the very start, the book is essential for anyone interested in history of Hispanism or the image of Spain in the United States, as well as the writers whose work Jaksic surveys."--Richard L. Kagan, Professor of History, Johns Hopkins University "Highly recommended." CHOICE
"This path-breaking book is the first comprehensive narrative and analysis of early U.S. scholars of Hispanic history and literature. The author opens new windows on the migration of ideas into and out of the U.S."--James Turner, Professor of the Humanities, University of Notre Dame "Iván Jaksic's extraordinary study of a generation of mid-nineteenth century New Englanders fascinated with Spain and its satellites across the Atlantic sets new standards in the examination of the origins of Hispanism as a discipline in the English-speaking world. Meet, among others, Mary Mann, Sarmiento's translator and unofficial publicity agent; W.H. Prescott, a warrior in spite of his blindness; and Washington Irving, whose intellectual thefts are still unchallenged. This un-Metaphysical Club still defines the way we misconceive Hispanic civilization in the United States."--Ilan Stavans, Lewis-Sebring Professor of Latin American and Latino Culture, Amherst College, and author of The Hispanic Condition and Spanglish "This is unquestionably the best study on Spain's place in the imaginary of nineteenth century America. Ranging widely over the work of such luminaries as Washington Irving, Henry Wadswoth Longfellow, George Ticknor, Wlliam Hikling Prescott, and a bit of Melville as well, the scholarship is original and the presentation superb. A page-turner from the very start, the book is essential for anyone interested in history of Hispanism, the image of Spain in the U.S., as well as the writers whose work Jaksic surveys."--Richard L. Kagan, Professor of History, Johns Hopkins University
"This path-breaking book is the first comprehensive narrative and analysis of early U.S. scholars of Hispanic history and literature. The author opens new windows on the migration of ideas into and out of the U.S."--James Turner, Professor of the Humanities, University of Notre Dame "Ivan Jaksic's extraordinary study of a generation of mid-nineteenth century New Englanders fascinated with Spain and its satellites across the Atlantic sets new standards in the examination of the origins of Hispanism as a discipline in the English-speaking world. Meet, among others, Mary Mann, Sarmiento's translator and unofficial publicity agent; W.H. Prescott, a warrior in spite of his blindness; and Washington Irving, whose intellectual thefts are still unchallenged. This un-Metaphysical Club still defines the way we misconceive Hispanic civilization in the United States."--Ilan Stavans, Lewis-Sebring Professor of Latin American and Latino Culture, Amherst College, and author ofThe Hispanic ConditionandSpanglish "This is unquestionably the best study on Spain's place in the imaginary of nineteenth century America. Ranging widely over the work of such luminaries as Washington Irving, Henry Wadswoth Longfellow, George Ticknor, Wlliam Hikling Prescott, and a bit of Melville as well, the scholarship is original and the presentation superb. A page-turner from the very start, the book is essential for anyone interested in history of Hispanism, the image of Spain in the U.S., as well as the writers whose work Jaksic surveys."--Richard L. Kagan, Professor of History, Johns Hopkins University "Highly recommended." CHOICE
"This path-breaking book is the first comprehensive narrative and analysis of early U.S. scholars of Hispanic history and literature. The author opens new windows on the migration of ideas into and out of the U.S."--James Turner, Professor of the Humanities, University of Notre Dame "Ivan Jaksic's extraordinary study of a generation of mid-nineteenth century New Englanders fascinated with Spain and its satellites across the Atlantic sets new standards in the examination of the origins of Hispanism as a discipline in the English-speaking world. Meet, among others, Mary Mann, Sarmiento's translator and unofficial publicity agent; W.H. Prescott, a warrior in spite of his blindness; and Washington Irving, whose intellectual thefts are still unchallenged. This un-Metaphysical Club still defines the way we misconceive Hispanic civilization in the United States."--Ilan Stavans, Lewis-Sebring Professor of Latin American and Latino Culture, Amherst College, and author of The Hispanic Condition and Spanglish "This is unquestionably the best study on Spain's place in the imaginary of nineteenth century America. Ranging widely over the work of such luminaries as Washington Irving, Henry Wadswoth Longfellow, George Ticknor, Wlliam Hikling Prescott, and a bit of Melville as well, the scholarship is original and the presentation superb. A page-turner from the very start, the book is essential for anyone interested in history of Hispanism, the image of Spain in the U.S., as well as the writers whose work Jaksic surveys."--Richard L. Kagan, Professor of History, Johns Hopkins University "Highly recommended." CHOICE
"This path-breaking book is the first comprehensive narrative and analysis of early U.S. scholars of Hispanic history and literature. The author opens new windows on the migration of ideas into and out of the U.S." --James Turner, Professor of the Humanities, University of Notre Dame
"This path-breaking book is the first comprehensive narrative and analysis of early U.S. scholars of Hispanic history and literature. The author opens new windows on the migration of ideas into and out of the U.S."--James Turner, Professor of the Humanities, University of Notre Dame "Ivan Jaksic's extraordinary study of a generation of mid-nineteenth century New Englanders fascinated with Spain and its satellites across the Atlantic sets new standards in the examination of the origins of Hispanism as a discipline in the English-speaking world. Meet, among others, Mary Mann, Sarmiento's translator and unofficial publicity agent; W.H. Prescott, a warrior in spite of his blindness; and Washington Irving, whose intellectual thefts are still unchallenged. This un-Metaphysical Club still defines the way we misconceive Hispanic civilization in the United States."--Ilan Stavans, Lewis-Sebring Professor of Latin American and Latino Culture, Amherst College, and author of "The Hispanic Condition" and "Spanglish" "This is unquestionably the best study on Spain's place in the imaginary of nineteenth century America. Ranging widely over the work of such luminaries as Washington Irving, Henry Wadswoth Longfellow, George Ticknor, Wlliam Hikling Prescott, and a bit of Melville as well, the scholarship is original and the presentation superb. A page-turner from the very start, the book is essential for anyone interested in history of Hispanism, the image of Spain in the U.S., as well as the writers whose work Jaksic surveys."--Richard L. Kagan, Professor of History, Johns Hopkins University
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, September 2008
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Summaries
Description for Bookstore
This book examines why several American literary and intellectual icons found themselves to be pioneering scholars and lifelong students of the Hispanic world. The author asserts that these gifted Americans focused on the Hispanic world that they might shape their own country's identity after Independence and the War 1812, a crucial time for the young republic, and that they found inspiration in a most unlikely place: the seat of the collapsing Spanish empire.
Main Description
This book examines why several American literary and intellectual icons found themselves to be pioneering scholars and lifelong students of the Hispanic world.The author asserts that these gifted Americans focused on the Hispanic world that they might shape their own country's identity after Independence and the War 1812, a crucial time for the young republic, and that they found inspiration in a most unlikely place: the seat of the collapsing Spanish empire.
Bowker Data Service Summary
This title examines why several American literary and intellectual icons became pioneering scholars in the Hispanic world after Independence and the War 1812. At this crucial time for the young republic, these Americans found inspiration in the collapsing Spanish empire and used it to shape their own country's identity.
Main Description
This book examines why several American literary and intellectual icons found themselves to be pioneering scholars and lifelong students of the Hispanic world. The author asserts that these gifted Americans focused on the Hispanic world that they might shape their own country's identity after Independence and the War of 1812, a crucial time for the young republic, and that they found inspiration in a most unlikely place: the seat of the collapsing Spanish empire.
Table of Contents
Prefacep. ix
Introductionp. 1
"My King, My Country, and My Faith": Washington Irving's Writings on the Rise and Fall of Spainp. 7
Labor Ipse Voluptas: George Ticknor's History of Spanish Literaturep. 29
The Enlightened Foreigner: The Reception of Ticknor's Work in the Hispanic Worldp. 53
The Spanish Student: Henry Wadsworth Longfellowp. 69
Outre-Mer: Longfellow's Hispanic Tiesp. 91
Mary Peabody Mann and the Translation of South American Politicsp. 109
The "Annals of Barbarians": William H. Prescott and the Conquest of the New Worldp. 125
Knights-Errant and Bigots: Prescott's Writings on Spainp. 161
Conclusionp. 183
Notesp. 189
Bibliographyp. 237
Indexp. 247
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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