Catalogue


The evolution of intelligent systems [electronic resource] : how molecules became minds /
Ken Richardson.
imprint
Houndmills, Basingstoke, Hampshire ; New York : Palgrave Macmillan, 2010.
description
ix, 234 p. : ill. ; 23 cm.
ISBN
0230252494 (hardback), 9780230252493 (hardback)
format(s)
Book
More Details
imprint
Houndmills, Basingstoke, Hampshire ; New York : Palgrave Macmillan, 2010.
isbn
0230252494 (hardback)
9780230252493 (hardback)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
catalogue key
12026683
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 199-227) and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Ken Richardson was formerly Senior Lecturer at the Centre for Human Development and Learning, The Open University, UK (now retired). He has a wide experience in researching and teaching in brain biology, cognitive sciences and human development. He has published around 100 journal papers and is author of Understanding Psychology; Understanding Intelligence; Origins of Human Potential: Evolution, Development and Psychology; Models of Cognitive Development and The Making of Intelligence.
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2011-05-01:
This small book hopes to make the reader aware and appreciative of the complexity of human cognition. Richardson (ret., Open Univ., UK; The Making of Intelligence, CH, Jun'01, 38-5855; Understanding Intelligence, CH, Sep'91, 29-0605) proposes that evolutionary attempts to explain human cognition reduce thinking to an unrealistic simplicity. To make the argument for environment-linked complexity, chapters model complex systems at several levels with dynamic system theory. These include "Intelligent Life," "Bodily Intelligence," "Evolution of Development," "Intelligent Eye and Brain," "From Neurons to Cognition," "Cognitive Functions," and "Social Intelligence.. The final chapter presents a human "evolutionary spiral" due to cooperation, Vygotskyian embeddedness in culture, and cognition-emotion linkages. Though it is far easier to talk of complexity than it is to model and explain it, the book makes a good case against simplicity when explaining the complicated human mind. Summing Up: Recommended. Upper-division undergraduates through professionals/practitioners. J. A. Mather University of Lethbridge
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, May 2011
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Summaries
Description for Bookstore
This book examines the evolution of intelligent systems from origins of life to human cognition
Long Description
How did we get from unconscious material forces to the dazzling intricacy of the human mind? Standard evolutionary theory has not provided us with a continuous picture of that long emergence. In consequence, psychological theories remain highly fragmented, without deeper roots or foundations, while the general public either remain confused, or invoke miracles or the hand of an intelligent designer.   This book provides new concepts from dynamic systems theory, and the new evolutionary synthesis, to present a comprehensive overview of the evolution of cognition. It combines ideas about complexity and environmental structure to highlight the emergence of intelligent systems very early in evolution. Intelligent systems came to dominate evolution through increasing complexity, including cell signalling, epigenetics, developmental systems, behaviour, brain and cognitive systems, to culminate in the human cognitive and other mental systems. This volume has fundamental implications for psychological theory and our understanding of humanity.
Long Description
How did we get from unconscious material forces to the dazzling intricacy of the human mind? Standard evolutionary theory has not provided us with a continuous picture of that long emergence. In consequence, psychological theories remain highly fragmented, without deeper roots or foundations, while the general public either remain confused, or invoke miracles or the hand of an intelligent designer. This book provides new concepts from dynamic systems theory, and the new evolutionary synthesis, to present a comprehensive overview of the evolution of cognition. It combines ideas about complexity and environmental structure to highlight the emergence of intelligent systems very early in evolution. Intelligent systems came to dominate evolution through increasing complexity, including cell signalling, epigenetics, developmental systems, behaviour, brain and cognitive systems, to culminate in the human cognitive and other mental systems. This volume has fundamental implications for psychological theory and our understanding of humanity.
Main Description
How could something as seemingly transcendental as the human mind have arisen from far simpler material beginnings? This book provides a comprehensive overview of evolution from pre-life and early life forms through increasing complexity to advanced cognitive systems using a new framework based on dynamic systems theory.
Table of Contents
List of Illustrationsp. vi
Prefacep. viii
Why So Complex?p. 1
Fit for What?p. 19
Intelligent Lifep. 36
Bodily Intelligencep. 56
Evolution of Developmentp. 69
Intelligent Eye and Brainp. 90
From Neurons to Cognitionp. 112
Cognitive Functionsp. 135
Social Intelligencep. 160
Intelligent Humansp. 171
Notesp. 199
Indexp. 229
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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