Catalogue

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Envisioning disease, gender, and war [electronic resource] : women's narratives of the 1918 influenza pandemic /
Jane Elizabeth Fisher.
edition
First edition.
imprint
New York, NY : Palgrave Macmillan, 2012.
description
xii, 262 pages : illustrations ; 23 cm
ISBN
9780312234492 (hardback)
format(s)
Book
More Details
imprint
New York, NY : Palgrave Macmillan, 2012.
isbn
9780312234492 (hardback)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
abstract
"Katherine Anne Porter survived a severe case of influenza in 1918, but later observed, "[I]t simply divided my life, cut across it." The 1918 influenza pandemic spanned the end of World War I and the granting of female suffrage in the Western world, forcing changes in gender roles and subjectivity itself during the volatile early twentieth century. Focusing on major novels and essays by Willa Cather, Katherine Anne Porter, and Virginia Woolf, this work examines how narratives by women writers engage the 1918 influenza pandemic, emphasizing vision as compensation for the apocalyptic losses of both war and disease. While male characters-- at double jeopardy due to combat and pandemic-- inevitably die, female characters develop an appreciation of their own endurance, envisioning and accepting transformed futures. Drawing on World War I posters, poetry, songs, drawings, and photographs, Fisher's argument offers a persuasive framework connecting war, disease, and gender innovation to the shock of the modern in early twentieth-century culture. The book's last chapter extends her argument to late twentieth-century women authors such as the Canadian fiction writer Alice Munro, the American poet Ellen Bryant Voigt, and the Nigerian novelist Buchi Emecheta, whose works also evoke the 1918 influenza pandemic. Contemporary representations of the pandemic, however, do not grant it innovative power, regressively connecting it instead to conventional marriage and limited vision"--
catalogue key
12026535
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Jane Elizabeth Fisher is an associate professor of English at Canisius College, where she also serves as Director of the Women's Studies Program. Her teaching and writing concentrate on nineteenth- and twentieth-century literature and culture, with an emphasis on women writers and medical humanities.
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
This critical study illuminates the neglected intersection of war, disease, and gender as represented in an important subgenre of World War I literature. Novels by Virginia Woolf, Katherine Anne Porter and Alice Munro interpret the traumatic after effects of World War I and the influenza pandemic of 1918-20.
Description for Bookstore
An exploration of the neglected intersection of war, disease, and gender as represented in World War I literature
Main Description
After surviving a severe case of influenza in 1918, Katherine Anne Porter observed, 'It simply divided my life, cut across it.' The 1918 influenza pandemic spanned the volatile early twentieth century, a time period that included the end of World War I and the granting of female suffrage in the Western world. Focusing on major novels and essays by Willa Cather, Katherine Anne Porter, and Virginia Woolf, this work examines how narratives by women writers engage the 1918 influenza pandemic, emphasizing vision as compensation for losses of both war and disease. Drawing on World War I posters, poetry, songs, drawings, and photographs, the argument offers a persuasive framework for connecting war, disease, and gender to the shock of the modern in twentieth-century culture.
Main Description
After surviving a severe case of influenza in 1918, Katherine Anne Porter observed, "It simply divided my life, cut across it." The 1918 influenza pandemic spanned the volatile early twentieth century, a time period that included the end of World War I and the granting of female suffrage in the Western world. Focusing on major novels and essays by Willa Cather, Katherine Anne Porter, and Virginia Woolf, this work examines how narratives by women writers engage the 1918 influenza pandemic, emphasizing vision as compensation for losses of both war and disease. Drawing on World War I posters, poetry, songs, drawings, and photographs, the argument offers a persuasive framework for connecting war, disease, and gender to the shock of the modern in twentieth-century culture.
Main Description
Focusing on major novels and essays by Willa Cather, Katherine Anne Porter, and Virginia Woolf, this work examines how narratives by women writers engage the 1918 influenza pandemic, emphasizing visions as compensation for both losses of war and disease. Drawing on World War I posters, poetry, songs, drawings, and photographs, the argument offers a persuasive framework for connecting war, disease, and gender to the shock of the modern in twentieth-century culture.
Table of Contents
List of Figuresp. ix
Acknowledgmentsp. xi
Prologue The 1918 Influenza Pandemic and Modern Memoryp. 1
The Fldneuse: Seeing and Remembering the Shock of Modernityp. 27
Gender and Modernity: The Things Not Named in One of Oursp. 39
"Novels Devoted to Influenza": Regarding War and Illness in Mrs. Dallowayp. 73
Vision, Plague, and Apocalypse in "Pale Horse, Pale Rider"p. 105
Munro's "Carried Away" and Voigt's Kyrie: Ghostly Hauntings, Sublime Eclipsesp. 149
The 1918 Influenza Pandemic in the Developing World: Elechi Amadi and Buchi Emecheta's Occluded Visionp. 177
Epilogue Loss, Contagion, and Communityp. 197
Notesp. 203
Indexp. 251
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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