Catalogue


Contesting the Nigerian state [electronic resource] : civil society and the contradictions of self-organization /
edited by Mojúbàolú Olúfúnké Okome.
imprint
New York, NY : Palgrave Macmillan, [2013]
description
viii, 259 pages ; 22 cm
ISBN
113732452X (alk. paper), 9781137324528 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
More Details
imprint
New York, NY : Palgrave Macmillan, [2013]
isbn
113732452X (alk. paper)
9781137324528 (alk. paper)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
contents note
Contesting the Nigerian state: civil society and the contradictions of self-organization: introduction, concepts, and questions / Mojúbàolú Olúfúnké Okome -- Civil society and the challenges of development and nation building in the post colonial African state / Ademola Araoye -- State failure and the contradictions of the public sphere, 1995-2005 / Ayo Olukotun -- Mobilizing for change: the press and the struggle for citizenship in democratic Nigeria / Wale Adebanwi -- Gendered states: women's civil society activism in Nigerian politics / Mojúbàolú Olúfúnké Okome -- Feminist civil society organizations and democratization in Nigeria / Funmi Soetan -- Women's associational life within traditional institutions in Yoruba states / Fatai A. Olasupo -- Sexual struggles and democracy dividends / Ebenezer Obadare -- Politics in a sub-formal economic setting: workplace investment co-operatives in southwestern Nigeria, c.1986-2011 / Olufemi A. Akinola.
general note
Papers from the conference (Un)civil Society--State Failure and the Contradictions of Self-Organisation in Nigeria, held May 14-17, 2005 in Lagos, Nigeria.
catalogue key
12025709
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Mojbol Olfnk Okome is Professor of Political Science at Brooklyn College, CUNY, USA. She is co-edited (with Olufemi Vaughan) of Transnational Africa and Globalization and West African Migrations: Transnational and Global Pathways in a New Century (2012) and the author of A Sapped Democracy: The Political Economy of the Structural Adjustment Program and the Political Transition in Nigeria (1998). She is the founder and editor of the online peer-reviewed journal, rnkrind: A Journal of African Migration and co-founder of Jenda: Journal of African Culture and Women Studies.
Reviews
Review Quotes
"An amazing read! Beyond Mojubaolu Okome's signature brio in her editor's introduction, the volume assembles significant reflections by established thinkers from a broad range of disciplines. Society, development, citizenship, democracy, politics, gender, activism are all subjects treated brilliantly within the context of the contradictions of postcolonial statehood in Nigeria. This is a landmark contribution to African thought." - Pius Adesanmi, Winner of the Penguin Prize for African Writing 'This book provides a rich and bottom-up political sociology of the postcolonial Nigerian state. Using relevant empirically-grounded case studies, the book critically examines the emergence, evolution, and transformation of the institution and capacity of the Nigerian state with particular reference to how diverse civil society organizations and global political-economic processes and agents shape the dynamic mutually constitutive state-society relations from the colonial period to the twenty-first century. I highly recommend it to anyone interested in understanding the relationship between the state and national development in Nigeria's social history.' - Samuel Zalanga, Professor of Sociology, Bethel University, USA 'Timely yet of enduring value, this book is crafted to provide a lasting bridge between theory and practice in state-civil society relations in contemporary Nigeria. Edited by some of the finest and brightest of Nigeria's intellectuals at home and in the diaspora, the book as a whole speaks eloquently and soberly to the troubled Nigerian experience with a survey of the past and an eye to the future that gleans hope on the horizon for a vibrant people long held back by despots and their fellow travelers in politics, economy, and society.' - Adigun Agbaje, Professor of Political Science, University of Ibadan, Nigeria
"An amazing read! Beyond Mojubaolu Okome's signature brio in her editor's introduction, the volume assembles significant reflections by established thinkers from a broad range of disciplines. Society, development, citizenship, democracy, politics, gender, activism are all subjects treated brilliantly within the context of the contradictions of postcolonial statehood in Nigeria. This is a landmark contribution to African thought." - Pius Adesanmi, Winner of the Penguin Prize for African Writing
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
This text addresses the meanings and implications of self-organization and state society relations in contemporary Nigerian politics.
Main Description
In public choice theory, the received wisdom has long been that self-organization is an impediment to collective action, whether via the tragedy of the commons or a Hobbesian scenario in which self-interest produces social conflict rather than cooperation. Yet as this fascinating collection shows, self-organization and state-society relations have been much more complicated in the context of contemporary Nigerian politics. Given the absence or unwillingness of the Nigerian state to provide essential services, entire communities have had to band together to repair roads, build health centers, and maintain public utilities, all from levies. The successes, failures, and ongoing challenges faced by Nigerian society provide valuable insights into the state's capacity, its relationship with civil society, and the social, economic, and political well-being of its citizens. Book jacket.
Long Description
In public choice theory, the received wisdom has long been that self-organization is an impediment to collective action, whether via the tragedy of the commons or a Hobbesian scenario in which self-interest produces social conflict rather than cooperation. Yet as this fascinating collection shows, self-organization and state-society relations have been much more complicated in the context of contemporary Nigerian politics. Given the absence or unwillingness of the Nigerian state to provide essential services, entire communities have had to band together to repair roads, build health centers, and maintain public utilities, all from levies. The successes, failures, and ongoing challenges faced by Nigerian society provide valuable insights into the state's capacity, its relationship with civil society, and the social, economic, and political well-being of its citizens.
Long Description
This book addresses the meanings and implications of self-organization and state society relations in contemporary Nigerian politics. The conventional wisdom in public choice theory is that self-organization could generate collective action problems, via the tragedy of the commons, or the prisoner's dilemma, or a condition akin to Hobbes' state of nature, where selfish interests produce social conflict rather than cooperation. In the absence or unwillingness of the state to provide such services, entire communities in Nigeria have had to band together to repair roads, build health centers, repair broken transformers owned by the public utilities company, all from levies. Consideration of post-authoritarian state-civil society relations in Nigeria began in a situation where the state was deeply embroiled in a morass of economic and political crises, further complicating these relations, and lending urgency to questions about state capacity, as well as the nature of the relationship between state and civil society, and their implication for the social, economic and political health and well being of the democratizing polity and its citizens.
Table of Contents
List of Illustrationsp. ix
Acknowledgmentsp. xi
Contesting the Nigerian State: Civil Society and the Contradictions of Self-Organization-Introduction, Concepts, and Questionsp. 1
Civil Society and the Challenges of Development and Nation Building in the Eostcolonial African Statep. 25
State Failure and the Contradictions of the Public Sphere, 1995-2005p. 57
Mobilizing for Change: The Press and the Struggle for Citizenship in Democratic Nigeriap. 79
Gendered States: Women's Civil Society Activism in Nigerian Politicsp. 109
Feminist Civil Society Organizations and Democratization in Nigeriap. 157
Women's Associational Life within Traditional Institutions Yorùbá Statesp. 173
Sexual Struggles and Democracy Dividendsp. 199
Politics in a Sub-Formal Economic Setting: Workplace Investment Cooperatives in Southwestern Nigeria, c. 1986-2011p. 217
Notes on Contributorsp. 245
Indexp. 249
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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