Catalogue


Confronting the climate [electronic resource] : British airs and the making of environmental medicine /
Vladimir Janković.
edition
1st ed.
imprint
New York : Palgrave Macmillan, c2010.
description
x, 229 p. : ill. ; 22 cm.
ISBN
0230104754 (hbk.), 9780230104754 (hbk.)
format(s)
Book
More Details
imprint
New York : Palgrave Macmillan, c2010.
isbn
0230104754 (hbk.)
9780230104754 (hbk.)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
catalogue key
12025624
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Vladimir Jankovic is a historian of medical and environmental sciences at the Centre for the History of Science, Technology and Medicine, University of Manchester. He has published in the history and geography of environmental knowledge, sociology of atmospheric sciences, and medical climatology. His books and edited volumes include Reading the Skies, Intimate Universality, and Weather, Local Knowledge and Everyday Life.
Reviews
Review Quotes
'...fascinating book...overall this is an original and informative addition to the historical literature on health and environment.' - Stephen Mosley, Leeds Metropolitan University, Social History of Medicine 'Thought-provoking … By showing the extensive links between ideas of bodies, comfort, risk, and moral behavior, Jankovic has ensured a more complicated discussion of modern environmental thought.' - The History of Science Society
'...fascinating book...overall this is an original and informative addition to the historical literature on health and environment.' - Stephen Mosley, Leeds Metropolitan University, Social History of Medicine
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Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
Exploring the social origins of the Western preoccupation with health and the environment, this book explores the ideas put forward by Enlightenment doctors, naturalists and engineers in constructing the notion of bodily risk associated with foul air, cold, humidity and unventilated space.
Main Description
Confronting the Climate reveals the origins of our preoccupation with health and the environment. It explores the ideas put forward by Enlightenment doctors, naturalists, and engineers, in constructing the notion of bodily risk associated with the foul air, cold, humidity, and unventilated space. As intolerance to stench, squalor, and inclement weather took over the Enlightened theory of disease, the notion of exposure to external influences became the central concept in understanding one's quality of life in the rapidly changing demographic and physical environments. The human body as exposed to an outside threat became a specifically modern way of thinking about privacy, comfort and risk in the age of delicacy. Book jacket.
Main Description
This book explores the social origins of the Western preoccupation with health and environmental hazards. It looks at the rise of the dichotomy between the vulnerable "in" and the threatening "out" by examining the pathologies associated with weather, domestic space, ventilation, clothing, and travel in Britain at the turn of the 19th century.
Table of Contents
List of Illustrationsp. vii
Acknowledgmentsp. ix
Introductionp. 1
Exposed and Vulnerablep. 15
Cursed by Comfortp. 41
Artificial Airsp. 67
Intimate Climatesp. 93
The Choice of Airp. 119
Conclusionp. 151
Notesp. 157
Bibliographyp. 209
Indexp. 225
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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