Catalogue


Class inequality in austerity Britain [electronic resource] : power, difference and suffering /
edited by Will Atkinson, Steven Roberts and Mike Savage.
imprint
Houndmills, Basingstoke, Hampshire ; New York : Palgrave Macmillan, 2012.
description
viii, 195 p. ; 23 cm.
ISBN
9781137016379 (hardback)
format(s)
Book
More Details
imprint
Houndmills, Basingstoke, Hampshire ; New York : Palgrave Macmillan, 2012.
isbn
9781137016379 (hardback)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
catalogue key
12025414
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Will Atkinson is British Academy Postdoctoral Research Fellow in the School of Sociology, Politics and International Studies at the University of Bristol, UK. Steven Roberts is Lecturer in Social Policy and Sociology at the University of Kent, UK. Mike Savage is Professor of Sociology at the London School of Economics and Political Science, UK.
Reviews
Review Quotes
"A timely and welcome attempt to make a public debate about enforced austerity and amplified entitlements. Drawing on substantive research findings from experts across a wide range of fields, the book is essential reading for those who want to understand what is really happening at the moment. It reveals how it is not just the economy and politics that are being radically reshaped but people's hopes, desires and futures." - Beverley Skeggs, Professor of Sociology, Goldsmiths, University of London, UK
'A timely and welcome attempt to make a public debate about enforced austerity and amplified entitlements. Drawing on substantive research findings from experts across a wide range of fields, the book is essential reading for those who want to understand what is really happening at the moment. It reveals how it is not just the economy and politics that are being radically reshaped but people's hopes, desires and futures.' - Beverley Skeggs, Professor of Sociology, Goldsmiths, University of London, UK 'Everyone wondered whether the 'Big Society', was just the latest example of political gesturing, blaming the poor for their poverty and suggesting that only those with the time and money to provide their own services deserve them? Are you, your friends and neighbours at risk of been duped into thinking that working-class communities in Britain are 'broken' and in need of punitive intervention? Then read Class Inequality in Austerity Britain: Power, Difference and Suffering.' - Danny Dorling, Professor of Human Geography, University of Sheffield, UK
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Description for Bookstore
This volume explores the impact of the economic crisis and austerity measures on social class inequality in the UK
Long Description
When the Coalition Government came to power in 2010 in claimed it would deliver not just austerity, as necessary as that apparently was, but also fairness. This volume subjects this pledge to critical interrogation by exposing the interests behind the policy programme pursued and their damaging effects on class inequalities. Situated within a recognition of the longer-term rise of neoliberal politics, reflections on the status of sociology as a source of critique and current debates over the relationship between the cultural and economic dimensions of social class, the contributors cover an impressively wide range of relevant topics, from education, family policy and community to crime and consumption, shedding new light on the experience of domination in the early 21st Century.
Main Description
When the coalition government came to power in 2010 it claimed it would deliver not just austerity, as necessary as that apparently was, but also fairness. This volume subjects this pledge to critical interrogation by exposing the interests behind the policy program pursued and their damaging effects on class inequalities. Situated within a recognition of the longer-term rise of neoliberal politics, reflections on the status of sociology as a source of critique and current debates over the relationship between the cultural and economic dimensions of social class, the contributors cover an impressively wide range of relevant topics, from education, family policy and community to crime and consumption, shedding new light on the experience of domination in the early Twenty-First Century.
Table of Contents
List of Figures and Tablesp. vii
List of Contributorsp. viii
Introduction: A Critical Sociology of the Age of Austerityp. 1
Economic Crisis and Classed Everyday Life: Hysteresis, Positional Suffering and Symbolic Violencep. 13
'We never get a fair chance': Working-Class Experiences of Education in the Twenty-First Centuryp. 33
Banking on the Future: Choices, Aspirations and Economic Hardship in Working-Class Student Experiencep. 51
'Aspirations' and Imagined Futures: The Im/possibilities for Britain's Young Working Classp. 70
Personalising Poverty: Parental Determinism and the Big Society Agendap. 90
The Urban Outcasts of the British Cityp. 111
The Stigmatised and De-valued Working Class: The State of a Council Estatep. 128
Broken Communities?p. 145
Facing the Challenge of the Return of the Richp. 163
Conclusion: Three Challenges to the Exportation of Sociological Knowledgep. 180
Select Bibliographyp. 188
Indexp. 193
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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