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Bureaucrats and bourgeois society [electronic resource] : office politics and individual credit : France, 1789-1848 /
by Ralph Kingston.
imprint
New York, NY : Palgrave Macmillan, 2012.
description
237 p. ; 23 cm.
ISBN
9780230304314
format(s)
Book
More Details
imprint
New York, NY : Palgrave Macmillan, 2012.
isbn
9780230304314
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
contents note
Illustrations -- Acknowledgements -- Introduction : 20,000 fools -- Office politics -- A revolution in administration : the theory and practice of government during the French revolution -- Revolutionary time and space : the anxieties of administrative "transparency ' -- Telling tales : collaboration, career-making, and the contest for credit -- Bureaucrats in bourgeois society -- Civil servant, civil society : the accumulation of "honor" in bourgeois society -- Surrogate fathers, suitable sons : manufacturing "paternity" and honorable inheritance -- The social politics of bureaucracy : the "bureaucrat" as "bourgeois type" -- Coda & conclusion : the failure of 1848 : bourgeois social capital at the crossroads -- Note on method and sources and select bibliography -- Endnotes.
catalogue key
12025129
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 205-229).
A Look Inside
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
Between 1789 and 1848, clerks modified their occupational practices, responding to political scrutiny and state-administration reforms. Ralph Kingston examines the lives and influence of bureaucrats as they helped define 19th-century bourgeois social capital, ideals of emulation, honour and masculinity.
Description for Bookstore
An investigation of how early nineteenth-century French clerks modified their occupational practices and helped define bourgeois social capital, ideals of emulation, honour, and masculinity
Long Description
How did the French Revolution change ordinary lives? Bureaucrats and Bourgeois Society asks this question in relation to office clerks working in Parisian administrations. Under new masters, these clerks faced radical changes to work practices as reforming politicians looked to implement new 'administrative science'. Many also faced the loss of family inheritances, as positions no longer passed down from father to son. Clerks were now expected to make their career as individuals. In practice, this meant increased job insecurity. Administrators lived under the threat of regular cuts in pay and of personnel. In this situation, some believed that the way to get ahead was by playing office politics. In the early nineteenth century, however, clerks mitigated their situation by modifying occupational practices. Inside the offices, they settled new modes of judging individual merit. Outside, they accumulated other forms of individual credit, in the process helping to define nineteenth-century bourgeois social capital, ideals of emulation, honor, and masculinity. Job insecurity, however, continued to set 'bureaucrats' apart from the bourgeoisie and their social identity came under question during the July Monarchy and 1848 Revolution.
Main Description
Between 1789 and 1848, clerks modified their occupational practices, responding to political scrutiny and state-administration reforms. Ralph Kingston examines the lives and influence of bureaucrats inside and outside the office as they helped define nineteenth-century bourgeois social capital, ideals of emulation, honor, and masculinity.
Table of Contents
List of Illustrationsp. vi
Acknowledgementsp. vii
Foreword to the Seriesp. ix
Introduction: 20,000 Foolsp. 1
Office Politics
A Revolution in Administration: The Theory and Practice of Government During the French Revolutionp. 11
Revolutionary Time and Space: The Anxieties of Administrative 'Transparency'p. 31
Telling Tales: Collaboration, Career Making and the Contest for Creditp. 52
Bureaucrats in Bourgeois Society
Civil Servant, Civil Society: The Accumulation of 'Honour' in Bourgeois Civil Societyp. 75
Surrogate Fathers, Suitable Sons: Manufacturing 'Paternity' and Honourable Inheritancep. 94
The Social Politics of Bureaucracy: The 'Bureaucrat' as 'Bourgeois Type'p. 114
Coda and Conclusion: The Failure of 1848: Bourgeois Social Capital at the Crossroadsp. 141
Note on Method and Sourcesp. 155
Endnotesp. 157
Select Bibliographyp. 205
Indexp. 230
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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