Catalogue

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Bad presidents [electronic resource] : failure in the White House /
Philip Abbott.
imprint
New York, New York : Palgrave Macmillan, 2013.
description
x, 260 pages ; 23 cm.
ISBN
9781137306586 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
More Details
imprint
New York, New York : Palgrave Macmillan, 2013.
isbn
9781137306586 (alk. paper)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
contents note
Classifications, presidents and kings -- The first bad president: John Tyler -- The compromise: Millard Fillmore -- The byronic president: Franklin Pierce -- Building the house?: James Buchanan -- Lincoln in reverse: Andrew Johnson -- The first hidden hand bad president: Ulysses S. Grant -- The booster: Warren G. Harding -- The minimalist: Calvin Coolidge -- Weathering the storm: Herbert Hoover -- Ex parte exercitii: Richard Nixon -- The latest bad president?: George W. Bush -- Conclusion.
catalogue key
12024818
A Look Inside
Reviews
Review Quotes
"Philip Abbott is one of the nation's leading presidency scholars. His edge is a deep historical understanding of executive power and his franchise is the accidental presidents, the failed presidents, the bad presidents, the presidents bruised and battered and sometimes crushed by the office. We all know how much we learn from the study of great presidents, but Abbott has again surprised by showing us just how much there is to learn from a close and candid look at failed presidents." - Cal Jillson, Professor of Political Science, Southern Methodist University, USA "This truly important project is original, creative, significant, and fun." Lara Brown, Assistant Professor of Political Science, Villanova University, USA
"Philip Abbott is one of the nation's leading presidency scholars. His edge is a deep historical understanding of executive power and his franchise is the accidental presidents, the failed presidents, the bad presidents, the presidents bruised and battered and sometimes crushed by the office. We all know how much we learn from the study of great presidents, but Abbott has again surprised by showing us just how much there is to learn from a close and candid look at failed presidents." - Cal Jillson, Professor of Political Science, Southern Methodist University, USA"This truly important project is original, creative, significant, and fun." Lara Brown, Assistant Professor of Political Science, Villanova University, USA
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Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
'Bad Presidents' seeks to interpret the meaning of presidential 'badness' by investigating the ways in which 11 presidents of the United States were 'bad.' The author brings a unique, and often amusing perspective on the idea of the presidency, and begins a new conversation about the definition of presidential success and failure.
Long Description
George Washington, Abraham Lincoln and Franklin Delano Roosevelt are always at the top of presidential rankings. But what about those presidents who consistently appear at or near the bottom of these lists? Based on the insights found in Shakespeare's treatment of two bad kings, Abbott identifies two kinds of bad presidents and examines the case for including eleven in this category. In each case study, from John Tyler to Richard Nixon (and possibly George W. Bush), he finds a tipping point that places them in this unenviable category. Abbott concludes by discussing why we elected these bad presidents in the first place and how we might avoid adding future bad presidents to the list.
Main Description
George Washington, Abraham Lincoln, and Franklin Delano Roosevelt are always at the top of presidential rankings. But what about those presidents who consistently appear at or near the bottom of these lists? Based on the insights found in Shakespeare's treatment of two bad kings, Abbott identifies two kinds of bad presidents and examines the case for including eleven in this category. In each case study, from John Tyler to Richard Nixon (and possibly George W. Bush), he finds a tipping point that places them in this unenviable category. Abbott concludes by discussing why we elected these bad presidents in the first place and how we might avoid adding future bad presidents to the list.

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