Catalogue


American politics in the age of ignorance [electronic resource] : why lawmakers choose belief over research /
David Schultz.
edition
1st ed.
imprint
New York : Palgrave Macmillan, 2013.
description
vi, 139 p. : ill. ; 23 cm.
ISBN
1137308710 (hbk.), 9781137308719 (hbk.)
format(s)
Book
More Details
series title
series title
imprint
New York : Palgrave Macmillan, 2013.
isbn
1137308710 (hbk.)
9781137308719 (hbk.)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
contents note
States as Laboratories of Futility -- The Truth about Taxes: They Don't Matter Much -- Sportsfare: Welfare for Professional Sports -- Welfare Queens, Calculative Criminals, And the Myth of Homo Economicus -- Sending Signals: Illegal Immigrants and Teenage Sex -- Democracy is the Worst Form of Government -- Fool Me Twice, Shame on Me.
abstract
State and local governments are often trumpeted as laboratories of democracy, capable of significant policy innovation and expertise. Yet the reality is that states more often than not repeatedly reenact failed policies that past research shows do not work. American Politics in the Age of Ignorance contends that policy making is shrouded in many myths and that policy makers often ignore ample research and evidence when it comes to legislating on a range of issues. Examining such hot button issues as restricting immigration and welfare migration, seeking to lure businesses with tax breaks, and providing public subsidies for sports stadiums, this book catalogs a list of repeatedly enacted failed policies that public officials advocate, offering a critical and skeptical analysis of the policy process.
catalogue key
12024601
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 114-133) and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
David Schultz is a professor in the School of Business at Hamline University and author of more than 25 books and 90 articles on various aspects of American politics. He is regularly quoted in the media on these subjects including the New York Times, Wall Street Journal, and the Washington Post.
Reviews
Review Quotes
'American Politics in the Age of Ignorance is simultaneously depressing, hopeful and engaging. Depressing because of its convincing arguments and examples that government policies are consistently made based on 'political myths' accepted at face value by officeholders, candidates, journalists, and the public alike rather than on empirical social science evidence. Hopeful because it makes an equally compelling case that we actually know a good deal about what works and what does not, and in theory at least, have a policymaking process designed to provide the feedback necessary to learn from past successes and failures. And engaging because of the 'take no prisoners' style in which it is written. Finding solutions to the dilemma documented in these pages will not be easy, but I suggest as a first step that policymakers, journalists and citizens who care about the state of our nation read this book.' - Michael X. Delli Carpini, Dean of The Annenberg School for Communication, University of Pennsylvania "The divide between evidence and ideology in American political debate has never seemed so wide. With this small book, David Schultz applies actual, credible research to highly-charged assertions, separating fact from fiction and defending the propositions that citizenship requires respect for data and information, and that reason should trump uninformed emotion. The book is a plea for Americans to quit "dumbing down" our politics." - Sheila Suess Kennedy, Professor of Law and Public Policy, School of Public and Environmental Affairs, IUPUI
"American Politics in the Age of Ignorance is simultaneously depressing, hopeful and engaging. Depressing because of its convincing arguments and examples that government policies are consistently made based on 'political myths' accepted at face value by officeholders, candidates, journalists, and the public alike rather than on empirical social science evidence. Hopeful because it makes an equally compelling case that we actually know a good deal about what works and what does not, and in theory at least, have a policymaking process designed to provide the feedback necessary to learn from past successes and failures. And engaging because of the 'take no prisoners' style in which it is written. Finding solutions to the dilemma documented in these pages will not be easy, but I suggest as a first step that policymakers, journalists and citizens who care about the state of our nation read this book." - Michael X. Delli Carpini, Dean of The Annenberg School for Communication, University of Pennsylvania, USA "The divide between evidence and ideology in American political debate has never seemed so wide. With this small book, David Schultz applies actual, credible research to highly-charged assertions, separating fact from fiction and defending the propositions that citizenship requires respect for data and information, and that reason should trump uninformed emotion. The book is a plea for Americans to quit "dumbing down" our politics." - Sheila Suess Kennedy, Professor of Law and Public Policy, School of Public and Environmental Affairs, IUPUI
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Long Description
State and local governments are often trumpeted as laboratories of democracy, capable of significant policy innovation and expertise. Yet the reality is that states more often than not repeatedly reenact failed policies that past research shows do not work. American Politics in the Age of Ignorance contends that policy making is shrouded in many myths and that policy makers often ignore ample research and evidence when it comes to legislating on a range of issues. Examining such hot button issues as restricting immigration and welfare migration, seeking to lure businesses with tax breaks, and providing public subsidies for sports stadiums, this book catalogs a list of repeatedly enacted failed policies that public officials advocate, offering a critical and skeptical analysis of the policy process.
Table of Contents
List of Figuresp. vi
Introduction: If at First You Don't Succeed...p. 1
States as Laboratories of Futilityp. 15
The Truth about Taxes-They Don't Matter Muchp. 24
Sportsfare-Welfare for Professional Sportsp. 43
Welfare Queens, Calculative Criminals, and the Myth of Homo Economicusp. 58
Sending Signals: Illegal Immigrants and Teenage Sexp. 73
Democracy Is the Worst Form of Governmentp. 85
Conclusion: Fool Me Twice, Shame on Mep. 107
Bibliographyp. 114
Indexp. 134
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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