Catalogue


The returns of Odysseus [electronic resource] : colonization and ethnicity /
Irad Malkin.
imprint
Berkeley : University of California Press, c1998.
description
xiii, 331 p. : maps ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0520211855 (cloth : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
author
imprint
Berkeley : University of California Press, c1998.
isbn
0520211855 (cloth : alk. paper)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
catalogue key
12015568
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 275-313) and index.
A Look Inside
Excerpts
Flap Copy
"To voyage on this extraordinarily original book is like rounding a cape: Whole new vistas open up, both intellectual and literal. Around some bronze tripods uncovered on the shore of Ithaca, Irad Malkin weaves an interdisciplinary web of history, archaeology, religion, oral poetics, maritime geography, ethnography, colonial and post-colonial studies. Spell-binding!"--Oliver Taplin, Oxford University, author ofHomeric Soundings
Flap Copy
"To voyage on this extraordinarily original book is like rounding a cape: Whole new vistas open up, both intellectual and literal. Around some bronze tripods uncovered on the shore of Ithaca, Irad Malkin weaves an interdisciplinary web of history, archaeology, religion, oral poetics, maritime geography, ethnography, colonial and post-colonial studies. Spell-binding!"--Oliver Taplin, Oxford University, author of Homeric Soundings
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 1999-06-01:
"The question addressed in this book is how myths, especially what we know as Greek myths of the returns of Odysseus and other heroes, were used to mediate encounters and conceptualize ethnicity and group identity in the Archaic and Classical periods." Thus Malkin succinctly sets out the purpose of his study. Author of two earlier books on religion and myth, Malkin joins Jonathan Hall and others on the cutting edge of modern scholarship dealing with the formation of ethnicities among ancient peoples. Here Malkin shows how the Greek movement into the western Mediterranean not only influenced the myth-making processes of foreign peoples, but in turn eventually contributed to the Greek notion of dividing the world into "Greek" and "non-Greek" inhabitants. What is clear from this work, as from the work of his scholarly contemporaries, is that the acquisition of ethnicity is characterized as much by shared myths--especially the foreigner-as-founder myth--as by common language, religion, and social/political institutions. This is a book for specialists, although the author has thoughtfully provided an excellent introductory chapter in which his complex arguments are laid out in advance of the main body of the text. Upper-division undergraduates and above. E. N. Borza emeritus, Pennsylvania State University, University Park Campus
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, June 1999
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Summaries
Long Description
This remarkably rich and multifaceted study of early Greek exploration makes an original contribution to current discussions of the encounters between Greeks and non-Greeks. Focusing in particular on myths about Odysseus and other heroes who visited foreign lands on their mythical voyages homeward after the Trojan War, Irad Malkin shows how these stories functioned to mediate encounters and conceptualize ethnicity and identity during the Archaic and Classical periods. Synthesizing a wide range of archaeological, mythological, and literary sources, this exceptionally learned book strengthens our understanding of early Greek exploration and city-founding along the coasts of the Western Mediterranean, reconceptualizes the role of myth in ancient societies, and revitalizes our understanding of ethnicity in antiquity. Malkin shows how the figure of Odysseus became a proto-colonial hero whose influence transcended the Greek-speaking world. The return-myths constituted a generative mythology, giving rise to oral poems, stories, iconographic imagery, rituals, historiographical interpretation, and the articulation of ethnic identities. Reassessing the role of Homer and alternative return-myths, the book argues for the active historical function of myth and collective representations and traces their changing roles through a spectrum of colonial perceptions--from the proto-colonial, through justifications of expansion and annexation, and up to decolonization.
Table of Contents
List of Maps
Preface
Introductionp. 1
Contexts and Conceptsp. 33
Sailing and Colonizing in the Sea of Returnsp. 62
Ithaca and the Cult of Odysseusp. 94
The Odyssey's Alternatives: Ethnicity and Colonization in Epirusp. 120
Pithekoussai, Odysseus, and the Etruscansp. 156
Odysseus and Italy: A Peripheral Vision of Ethnicityp. 178
The Other Nostoi: Nestor, Epeios, Philoktetes, Trojan Sirisp. 210
The Other Nostoi: Diomedesp. 234
Homeric Issuesp. 259
Bibliographyp. 275
Indexp. 315
Table of Contents provided by Blackwell. All Rights Reserved.

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