Catalogue


The Deerslayer [electronic resource] /
James Fenimore Cooper ; introduction by Ezra Tawil.
imprint
Cambridge, Massachusetts : The Belknap Press of Harvard University Press, 2013.
description
xxxviii, 638 pages ; 21 cm.
ISBN
9780674057678 (pbk. : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
More Details
added author
imprint
Cambridge, Massachusetts : The Belknap Press of Harvard University Press, 2013.
isbn
9780674057678 (pbk. : alk. paper)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
catalogue key
12012245
 
Includes bibliographical references.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Library Journal on 2002-06-15:
This novel, Cooper's last contribution to his five-volume "Leatherstocking Tales," introduces Natty Bumppo as a young frontiersman in early 18th-century New York and keeps him busy rescuing white women from Indians. Since Cooper actually wrote this book last in his series, one would expect it to be competently written. However, it's impossible to listen to it without thinking of Mark Twain's savage essay "Fenimore Cooper's Literary Offenses," in which he calls The Deerslayer a "literary delirium tremens." Very apt. The book takes forever to go nowhere, and its dialog is a tortuous blend of stilted literary English and wholly imaginary frontier dialect. Such imperfections may be passed over on the printed page, but they are impossible to ignore when given voice. Narrator Raymond Todd reads descriptive passages just fine, but no one can make Cooper's dialog sound like real speech. This is better left to print editions. Kent Rasmussen, Thousand Oaks, CA (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
'The Deerslayer' is the first in plot order, though the fifth in order of writing, of the series of Leatherstocking Tales which Cooper himself and posterity have tended to consider his greatest work.
Main Description
Though The Deerslayer (1841) was the last of Cooper's five Leather-stocking tales to be written, it is the first in the chronology of Natty Bumppo's life. Set in the 1740s before the start of the French and Indian War, when Cooper's rugged frontiersman is in his twenties, Cooper's novel shows us how 'Deerslayer' becomes 'Hawkeye.' It remains the best point of entry into the series for modern readers. In his introduction, Ezra Tawil examines Cooper's motivations in writing The Deerslayer, the static nature of Natty, and Cooper's vexed racial politics. The John Harvard Library edition reproduces the authoritative text of The Deerslayer in The Writings of James Fenimore Cooper (State University of New York Press). Since 1959 The John Harvard Library has been instrumental in publishing essential American writings in authoritative editions.
Main Description
Though The Deerslayer (1841) was the last of Cooper's five Leather-stocking tales to be written, it is the first in the chronology of Natty Bumppo's life. Set in the 1740s before the start of the French and Indian War, when Cooper's rugged frontiersman is in his twenties, Cooper's novel shows us how "Deerslayer" becomes "Hawkeye." It remains the best point of entry into the series for modern readers. In his introduction, Ezra Tawil examines Cooper's motivations in writing The Deerslayer, the static nature of Natty, and Cooper's vexed racial politics. The John Harvard Library edition reproduces the authoritative text of The Deerslayer in The Writings of James Fenimore Cooper (State University of New York Press). Since 1959 The John Harvard Library has been instrumental in publishing essential American writings in authoritative editions.
Main Description
Though The Deerslayer (1841) was the last of Cooper's five Leather-stocking tales to be written, it is the first in the chronology of Natty Bumppo's life. Set in the 1740s before the start of the French and Indian War, when Cooper's rugged frontiersman is in his twenties, Cooper's novel shows us how Deerslayer becomes Hawkeye. It remains the best point of entry into the series for modern readers. In his introduction, Ezra Tawil examines Cooper's motivations in writing The Deerslayer, the static nature of Natty, and Cooper's vexed racial politics. The John Harvard Library edition reproduces the authoritative text of The Deerslayer in The Writings of James Fenimore Cooper (State University of New York Press). Since 1959 The John Harvard Library has been instrumental in publishing essential American writings in authoritative editions.

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