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White flight [electronic resource] : Atlanta and the making of modern conservatism /
Kevin M. Kruse.
imprint
Princeton, N.J. : Princeton University Press, c2005.
description
xiv, 325 p. : ill., maps ; 25 cm.
ISBN
0691092605 (cloth : alk. paper), 9780691092607
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Princeton, N.J. : Princeton University Press, c2005.
isbn
0691092605 (cloth : alk. paper)
9780691092607
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
contents note
"The city too busy to hate": Atlanta and the politics of progress. -- From radicalism to "respectability": race, residence, and segregationist strategy. -- From community to individuality: race, residence, and segregationist ideology. -- The abandonment of public space: desegregation, privatization, and the tax revolt. -- The "second battle of Atlanta": massive resistance and the divided middle class. -- The fight for "freedom of association": school desegregation and White withdrawal. -- Collapse of the coalition: sit-ins and the business rebellion. -- "The law of the land": federal intervention and the Civil Rights Act. -- City limits: urban separatism and suburban secession. -- Epilogue: The legacies of White flight.
catalogue key
11955351
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [269]-311) and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Kevin M. Kruse is Assistant Professor of History at Princeton University
Excerpts
Flap Copy
"In his study of Atlanta over the last 60 years, Kevin Kruse convincingly describes the critical connections between race, Sun Belt suburbanization, the rise of the new Republican majority. "White Flight" is a powerful and compelling book that should be read by anyone interested in modern American politics and post-World War II urban history."--Dan Carter, University of South Carolina""White Flight" is a myth-shattering book. Focusing on the city that prided itself as 'too busy to hate, ' Kevin Kruse reveals the everyday ways that middle-class whites in Atlanta resisted civil rights, withdrew from the public sphere, and in the process fashioned a new, grassroots, suburban-based conservatism. This important book has national implications for our thinking about the links between race, suburbanization, and the rise of the New Right."--Thomas J. Sugrue, Kahn Professor of History and Sociology, University of Pennsylvania, author of "The Origins of the Urban Crisis""This is an imaginative work that ably treats an important subject. Kruse gets beyond and beneath Atlanta's image as a place of racial moderation, the national center of the civil rights movement, and a seedbed of black political power to reveal other simultaneous, important currents at work."--Clifford Kuhn, Georgia State University"Kevin Kruse recasts our understanding of the conservative resistance to the civil rights movement. Shifting the spotlight from racial extremists to ordinary white urban dwellers, he shows that "white flight" to the suburbs was among the most powerful social movements of our time. That movement not only reconfigured the urban landscape, it also transformed political ideology, laying thegroundwork for the rise of the New Right and undermining the commitment of white Americans to the common good. No one can read this book and come away believing that the politics of suburbia are colorblind."--Jacquelyn Hall, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
Flap Copy
"In his study of Atlanta over the last 60 years, Kevin Kruse convincingly describes the critical connections between race, Sun Belt suburbanization, the rise of the new Republican majority. White Flight is a powerful and compelling book that should be read by anyone interested in modern American politics and post-World War II urban history."-- Dan Carter, University of South Carolina " White Flight is a myth-shattering book. Focusing on the city that prided itself as 'too busy to hate,' Kevin Kruse reveals the everyday ways that middle-class whites in Atlanta resisted civil rights, withdrew from the public sphere, and in the process fashioned a new, grassroots, suburban-based conservatism. This important book has national implications for our thinking about the links between race, suburbanization, and the rise of the New Right."-- Thomas J. Sugrue, Kahn Professor of History and Sociology, University of Pennsylvania, author of The Origins of the Urban Crisis "This is an imaginative work that ably treats an important subject. Kruse gets beyond and beneath Atlanta's image as a place of racial moderation, the national center of the civil rights movement, and a seedbed of black political power to reveal other simultaneous, important currents at work."-- Clifford Kuhn, Georgia State University "Kevin Kruse recasts our understanding of the conservative resistance to the civil rights movement. Shifting the spotlight from racial extremists to ordinary white urban dwellers, he shows that "white flight" to the suburbs was among the most powerful social movements of our time. That movement not only reconfigured the urban landscape, it also transformed political ideology, laying the groundwork for the rise of the New Right and undermining the commitment of white Americans to the common good. No one can read this book and come away believing that the politics of suburbia are colorblind."-- Jacquelyn Hall, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2006-10-01:
News that Dixie politics has switched from the "Solid South" of Democratic hegemony to that of Republican rule is no news at all, nor is the observation that changing racial demography has affected an exodus of whites from the nation's inner cities. But Kruse (Princeton Univ.), through impressive research and nuanced interpretation, brings these changes into sharper relief and interrelatedness by focusing on Atlanta, where change and resistance to change met full force in a head-on collision in the late 1950s and 1960s. The author argues that what began as a seemingly simple unwillingness to coexist in racially mixed neighborhoods morphed into a conservative ideology that embraced, among other positions, individualism, denunciations of big government, and demands for lower taxes. White flight, in a sense, came to mean white fight against liberalism. Was the example of Atlanta sui generis? Kruse thinks not, but believes that similar studies of other US cities are in order. Meanwhile, his book, which some may find too detailed, represents a solid addition to the understanding of both mid-century racial upheavals and latter-day conservative developments. It is also a model of "bottom up" local history. ^BSumming Up: Highly recommended. Upper-division undergraduates and above. R. Muccigrosso emeritus, Brooklyn College, CUNY
Reviews
Review Quotes
An ambitious, well-researched, and interesting study,White Flightoffers a provocative examination of the connections between race and conservative politics.
An ambitious, well-researched, and interesting study, White Flight offers a provocative examination of the connections between race and conservative politics.
"An ambitious, well-researched, and interesting study, White Flight offers a provocative examination of the connections between race and conservative politics."-- Jeff Roche, Journal of American History
Co-Winner of the 2007 Best Book Award, Urban Politics Section of the American Political Science Association Winner of the 2007 Francis B. Simkins Award, Southern Historical Association Winner of the 2007 Malcolm Bell, Jr., and Muriel Barrow Bell Award for the Best Book in Georgia History, Georgia Historical Society
In his book, Kevin Kruse analyzes the ideology accompanying white flight and its ongoing impact on American politics. . . . In a beautifully written, clearly structured, and deeply researched narrative, Kruse lays out the historical processes that led to the development of modern conservatism.
"In his book, Kevin Kruse analyzes the ideology accompanying white flight and its ongoing impact on American politics. . . . In a beautifully written, clearly structured, and deeply researched narrative, Kruse lays out the historical processes that led to the development of modern conservatism."-- Kristen OHare, Urban History Review
In Kruse's skillful hands, Atlanta's struggle over integration takes on many of the characteristics of low-level urban warfare. . . . Kruse illuminates a key phase in American political development.
"In Kruse's skillful hands, Atlanta's struggle over integration takes on many of the characteristics of low-level urban warfare. . . . Kruse illuminates a key phase in American political development."-- Kimberley S. Johnson, Perspectives on Politics
In "White Flight," a study of white resistance to desegregation in Atlanta, Kruse produces a panoramic and engaging portrayal of the struggle over desegregation.
In White Flight , a study of white resistance to desegregation in Atlanta, Kruse produces a panoramic and engaging portrayal of the struggle over desegregation.
"In White Flight , a study of white resistance to desegregation in Atlanta, Kruse produces a panoramic and engaging portrayal of the struggle over desegregation."-- Ronald Brownstein, American Prospect
Kruse presents a nuanced portrayal of the trends that fostered the growth of the suburbs and the casting aside of racist demagoguery.
"Kruse presents a nuanced portrayal of the trends that fostered the growth of the suburbs and the casting aside of racist demagoguery."-- Jonathan Tilove, Times-Picayune
Kruse provides a useful resource in the debate over the significance of race in politics. His book is thoroughly researched and well written. Students interested in modern politics and Civil Rights histories alike would greatly benefit from this work.
"Kruse provides a useful resource in the debate over the significance of race in politics. His book is thoroughly researched and well written. Students interested in modern politics and Civil Rights histories alike would greatly benefit from this work."-- Jensen E. Branscombe, Southern Historian
Kruse's ultimate success lies in using history to answer contemporary political questions, and without compromising his professional standards.
"Kruses ultimate success lies in using history to answer contemporary political questions, and without compromising his professional standards."-- Clay Risen, Nashville Scene
White Flightprovides a detailed yet fascinating history of right-wing backlash against the civil rights movement that has relevance not only for historians but also for political scientists. Kevin Kruse's study deserves a wide reading.
White Flight provides a detailed yet fascinating history of right-wing backlash against the civil rights movement that has relevance not only for historians but also for political scientists. Kevin Kruse's study deserves a wide reading.
" White Flight provides a detailed yet fascinating history of right-wing backlash against the civil rights movement that has relevance not only for historians but also for political scientists. Kevin Kruse's study deserves a wide reading."-- R. Claire Snyder, New Political Science
In his study of Atlanta over the last 60 years, Kevin Kruse convincingly describes the critical connections between race, Sun Belt suburbanization, the rise of the new Republican majority.White Flightis a powerful and compelling book that should be read by anyone interested in modern American politics and post-World War II urban history.
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, October 2006
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Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
Kevin Kruse argues that elements of modern conservatism, such as hostility to the federal government and faith in free enterprise, to specific issues like the tax revolt and privatisation of public services, was a dirct consequence of the postwar resistance of white Southerners to desegregation.
Main Description
During the civil rights era, Atlanta thought of itself as "The City Too Busy to Hate," a rare place in the South where the races lived and thrived together. Over the course of the 1960s and 1970s, however, so many whites fled the city for the suburbs that Atlanta earned a new nickname: "The City Too Busy Moving to Hate." In this reappraisal of racial politics in modern America, Kevin Kruse explains the causes and consequences of "white flight" in Atlanta and elsewhere. Seeking to understand segregationists on their own terms,White Flightmoves past simple stereotypes to explore the meaning of white resistance. In the end, Kruse finds that segregationist resistance, which failed to stop the civil rights movement, nevertheless managed to preserve the world of segregation and even perfect it in subtler and stronger forms. Challenging the conventional wisdom that white flight meant nothing more than a literal movement of whites to the suburbs, this book argues that it represented a more important transformation in the political ideology of those involved. In a provocative revision of postwar American history, Kruse demonstrates that traditional elements of modern conservatism, such as hostility to the federal government and faith in free enterprise, underwent important transformations during the postwar struggle over segregation. Likewise, white resistance gave birth to several new conservative causes, like the tax revolt, tuition vouchers, and privatization of public services. Tracing the journey of southern conservatives from white supremacy to white suburbia, Kruse locates the origins of modern American politics.
Main Description
During the civil rights era, Atlanta thought of itself as "The City Too Busy to Hate," a rare place in the South where the races lived and thrived together. Over the course of the 1960s and 1970s, however, so many whites fled the city for the suburbs that Atlanta earned a new nickname: "The City Too Busy Moving to Hate." In this reappraisal of racial politics in modern America, Kevin Kruse explains the causes and consequences of "white flight" in Atlanta and elsewhere. Seeking to understand segregationists on their own terms, White Flight moves past simple stereotypes to explore the meaning of white resistance. In the end, Kruse finds that segregationist resistance, which failed to stop the civil rights movement, nevertheless managed to preserve the world of segregation and even perfect it in subtler and stronger forms. Challenging the conventional wisdom that white flight meant nothing more than a literal movement of whites to the suburbs, this book argues that it represented a more important transformation in the political ideology of those involved. In a provocative revision of postwar American history, Kruse demonstrates that traditional elements of modern conservatism, such as hostility to the federal government and faith in free enterprise, underwent important transformations during the postwar struggle over segregation. Likewise, white resistance gave birth to several new conservative causes, like the tax revolt, tuition vouchers, and privatization of public services. Tracing the journey of southern conservatives from white supremacy to white suburbia, Kruse locates the origins of modern American politics.
Table of Contents
List of Illustrationsp. ix
Acknowledgmentsp. xi
Introductionp. 3
"The City Too Busy to Hate": Atlanta and the Politics of Progressp. 19
From Radicalism to "Respectability": Race, Residence, and Segregationist Strategyp. 42
From Community to Individuality: Race, Residence, and Segregationist Ideologyp. 78
The Abandonment of Public Space: Desegregation, Privatization, and the Tax Revoltp. 105
The "Second Battle of Atlanta": Massive Resistance and the Divided Middle Classp. 131
The Fight for "Freedom of Association": School Desegregation and White Withdrawalp. 161
Collapse of the Coalition: Sit-Ins and the Business Rebellionp. 180
"The Law of the Land": Federal Intervention and the Civil Rights Actp. 205
City Limits: Urban Separatism and Suburban Secessionp. 234
Epilogue: The Legacies of White Flightp. 259
List of Abbreviationsp. 267
Notesp. 269
Indexp. 313
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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