Catalogue


A laboratory of liberty [electronic resource] : the transformation of political culture in republican Switzerland, 1750-1848 /
by Marc H. Lerner.
imprint
Leiden ; Boston : Brill, 2012.
description
xvi, 371 p. : maps ; 25 cm.
ISBN
9004205152 (hbk. : alk. paper), 9789004205154 (hbk. : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
More Details
imprint
Leiden ; Boston : Brill, 2012.
isbn
9004205152 (hbk. : alk. paper)
9789004205154 (hbk. : alk. paper)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
contents note
Pt. 1. The end of the Old Regime in Europe and in the Swiss Eidgenossenschaft -- On the ideological origins of the revolution in Switzerland -- Ambivalent revolutionaries : the Helvetic Republic in revolutionary Europe -- pt. 2. Regeneration of a constructed past : continuities and discontinuities in the struggle between old and new visions of Switzerland and Europe -- The right to self-rule : the debate over legitimacy and the Vaud-Bern relationship -- Two visions of political society in inner Switzerland, 1829-33 -- Popular sovereignty in the Z├╝riputsch -- pt. 3. National accommodation -- Radical conceptions of the Confederation : popular sovereignty and the 1845 revolution in Vaud -- War, accommodation, and the making of the modern constitutional state.
catalogue key
11955053
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2012-05-01:
Seeking to understand how the Swiss Confederation evolved into a constitutional federal state beginning in 1848, the author argues clearly that there was no single path, but rather a series of experiments that, over a century, combined to ensure the acceptance of a new constitution. To document this process, Lerner (Univ. of Mississippi) focuses on three cantonal experiences he views as reflective of the Swiss case at large: Zurich, Schwyz (one of the foundational cantons), and French-speaking Vaud. The complexity of the Swiss case involves not only linguistic but also religious lines, which the author takes fully into account. He offers excellent overviews of political discussions and publications from other Swiss areas to show the malleable definitions that characterized such terms as individual freedom, popular sovereignty, and self-rule. Lerner shows convincingly that while the French Revolution acted as a catalyst to change, such an evolution also depended on Swiss actors reinterpreting radical political ideas in a way that would not split the confederation. Thus, moving away from republican centralization was both a reaction to the revolution and a way for the Swiss to come to terms with some of its early ideals. Summing Up: Recommended. Graduate students, faculty. G. P. de Syon Albright College
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Reference & Research Book News, April 2012
Choice, May 2012
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Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
Looking at a series of Swiss political debates, this book offers a case study of a revolutionary transformation to a rights-based society and political culture.
Description for Reader
Those interested in revolutionary Europe and atlantic world throughout the entire Age of Revolution (1750-1850), those interested in the history of political thought, republicanism and democratization.
Main Description
Looking at a series of Swiss political debates, this book offers a case study of a revolutionary transformation to a rights-based society and political culture. Based on a tradition of political innovation and experimentation, Swiss citizens recalibrated their understanding of liberty and republicanism from 1750 to 1848. The resulting hybrid political culture centered around republican ideas, changing understandings of liberty and self-rule. Drawing from the public political debates in three characteristic cantons, A Laboratory of Liberty places the Swiss transformation into a European context. Current trends in Revolutionary studies focus on the revolution in its global context and this book demonstrates that the Swiss case enhances our understanding of the debates over the nature of liberty in the transatlantic world during the Age of Revolution.
Long Description
Looking at a series of Swiss political debates, this book offers a case study of a revolutionary transformation to a rights-based society and political culture. Based on a tradition of political innovation and experimentation, Swiss citizens recalibrated their understanding of liberty and republicanism from 1750 to 1848. The resulting hybrid political culture centered around republican ideas, changing understandings of liberty and self-rule. Drawing from the public political debates in three characteristic cantons, A Laboratory of Libertyplaces the Swiss transformation into a European context. Current trends in Revolutionary studies focus on the revolution in its global context and this book demonstrates that the Swiss case enhances our understanding of the debates over the nature of liberty in the transatlantic world during the Age of Revolution.

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