Catalogue


Theatre in Southeast Asia [electronic resource] /
[by] James R. Brandon.
imprint
Cambridge, MA : Harvard University Press, 1967.
description
xiii, 370 p. : ill., maps.
ISBN
9780674875876
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
added author
imprint
Cambridge, MA : Harvard University Press, 1967.
isbn
9780674875876
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
catalogue key
11954591
 
Includes bibliography.
A Look Inside
Reviews
Review Quotes
A masterpiece of knowledge.
A most welcome and long awaited first survey... an immensely entertaining and readable style.
A compendium of information and a valuable contribution of its kind... an excellent text for Asian background courses and it goes without saying that for theatre students it is an essential source of reference. Even those Olympians, the sociologists, will find grist for their mills ... it is one of those works we can expect to find quoted and requoted.
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Summaries
Main Description
An astonishing variety of theatrical performances may be seen today in the eight countries of Southeast Asia-Burma, Cambodia, Indonesia, Laos, Malaysia, the Philippines, Thailand, and Vietnam. James Brandon spent more than three years observing and interviewing troup members in these countries. He describes twenty-five of the most important theatrical forms, grouping them according to their origins as folk, court, popular, or Western theatre. He considers the theatre from four perspectives: its origins, its art, its role as a social institution, and its function as a medium of communication and propaganda. Brandon's wide-ranging and lively discussion points out interesting similarities and differences among the countries, and many of his superb photographs are included here.
Main Description
An astonishing variety of theatrical performances may be seen today in the eight countries of Southeast Asia--Burma, Cambodia, Indonesia, Laos, Malaysia, the Philippines, Thailand, and Vietnam. James Brandon spent more than three years observing and interviewing troup members in these countries. He describes twenty-five of the most important theatrical forms, grouping them according to their origins as folk, court, popular, or Western theatre. He considers the theatre from four perspectives: its origins, its art, its role as a social institution, and its function as a medium of communication and propaganda. Brandon's wide-ranging and lively discussion points out interesting similarities and differences among the countries, and many of his superb photographs are included here.
Table of Contents
Introduction
A Historical Background
The Cultural Setting
The Development of Theatre Genres
Traditions of Theatre
Theatre as Art
Drama
Music and Dance
Production
Transmission of Theatre Art
Theatre as an Institution
Extent and Distribution
Theatre and the Social Contract
The Troupe
Economics
The Audience
Social Status of Troupes
Theatre as Communication
Past and Present
Theatre and Other Mass Media
Theatre and the Communication Process
Appendix: Major Theatre Genres as Performed in 1964
Bibiliography
Notes
Glossary
Index
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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