Catalogue

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Serving their country [electronic resource] : American Indian politics and patriotism in the twentieth century /
Paul C. Rosier.
imprint
Cambridge, Mass. : Harvard University Press, 2009.
description
360 p. : ill. ; 25 cm.
ISBN
0674036107 (alk. paper), 9780674036109 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Cambridge, Mass. : Harvard University Press, 2009.
isbn
0674036107 (alk. paper)
9780674036109 (alk. paper)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
contents note
Prologue: An empire for liberty -- Westward the course of empire -- The defense of the reservation -- World War II battlegrounds -- The Cold War on the Indian frontier -- Nation building at home and abroad -- The last Indian war -- Epilogue: Indian Country in the twenty-first century.
catalogue key
11953952
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [285] - 347) and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2010-09-01:
American Indians have served in the US military since there was a US, but they have done so within the context of maintaining their identity as Indians and as supporters of tribal sovereignty. Military service allowed many to articulate their insistence that the US recognize the legitimacy of tribal communities as culturally valid and independent polities because they were loyal Americans, too. Indian leaders were able to take advantage of the US need to counter Soviet propaganda about how badly Indians were treated in the US in order to vie for Third World support during the anticolonial 1960s and 1970s. Rosier (Villanova Univ.) places Indian politics in an international and US national context, rather than just seeing the drive for self-determination as an internal, political issue. Summing Up: Recommended. American history, Indian studies, and political science collections, upper-division undergraduates and above. G. Gagnon University of North Dakota
Reviews
Review Quotes
A fascinating study documenting how federal American Indian policies intersected with national and international issues...Although other historians have written about specific eras in which this intersection occurred, Rosier's intriguing and sweeping study adds much to the literature.
By putting Indian affairs in a broader, international context he does the field a great service.
Fascinating...This is an important book, certain to generate considerable discussion.
In this extensively researched and well-documented study, Rosier examines modern Native American political history within an international context.
Serving Their Country presents a compelling argument...Rosier has produced an important book that will provide scholars with much to engage, discuss, and debate.
A superb, innovative book. The story of Native Americans in the Cold War is without doubt one of the most important in the relationship between race and foreign affairs, and Rosier is the first to tell it in full. Impressively researched and engagingly written, this book fills a major gap in the literature and will have widespread appeal.
This pathbreaking book offers a fresh perspective on twentieth-century Indian politics, patriotism, and tribalism by tracking important intersections between domestic and international affairs. The Cold War and global colonization movements emboldened Native Americans to demand their rights. Simultaneously, events required them to defend their homelands from enemies both within and without the country. To be Indian and American poses no contradiction, as Rosier so wisely points out, if the nation lives up to its ideals and its treaty obligations.
This item was reviewed in:
Booklist, November 2009
Choice, September 2010
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Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
Over the 20th century, American Indians fought for their right to be both American and Indian. In this book, Paul C. Rosier traces how Indians defined democracy, citizenship, and patriotism in both domestic and international contexts.
Main Description
Over the twentieth century, American Indians fought for their right to be both American and Indian. In an illuminating book, Paul C. Rosier traces how Indians defined democracy, citizenship, and patriotism in both domestic and international contexts. Battles over the place of Indians in the fabric of American life took place on reservations, in wartime service, in cold war rhetoric, and in the courtroom. The Society of American Indians, founded in 1911, asserted that America needed Indian cultural and spiritual values. In World War II, Indians fought for their ancestral homelands and for the United States. The domestic struggle of Indian nations to defend their cultures intersected with the international cold war stand against termination-the attempt by the federal government to end the reservation system. Native Americans seized on the ideals of freedom and self-determination to convince the government to preserve reservations as places of cultural strength. Red Power activists in the 1960s and 1970s drew on Third World independence movements to assert an ethnic nationalism that erupted in a series of protests-in Iroquois country, in the Pacific Northwest, during the occupation of Alcatraz Island, and at Wounded Knee. Believing in an empire of liberty for all, Native Americans pressed the United States to honor its obligations at home and abroad. Like African Americans, twentieth-century Native Americans served as a visible symbol of an America searching for rights and justice. American history is incomplete without their story.
Main Description
Over the twentieth century, American Indians fought for their right to be both American and Indian. In an illuminating book, Paul C. Rosier traces how Indians defined democracy, citizenship, and patriotism in both domestic and international contexts.Battles over the place of Indians in the fabric of American life took place on reservations, in wartime service, in cold war rhetoric, and in the courtroom. The Society of American Indians, founded in 1911, asserted that America needed Indian cultural and spiritual values. In World War II, Indians fought for their ancestral homelands and for the United States. The domestic struggle of Indian nations to defend their cultures intersected with the international cold war stand against termination-the attempt by the federal government to end the reservation system. Native Americans seized on the ideals of freedom and self-determination to convince the government to preserve reservations as places of cultural strength. Red Power activists in the 1960s and 1970s drew on Third World independence movements to assert an ethnic nationalism that erupted in a series of protests-in Iroquois country, in the Pacific Northwest, during the occupation of Alcatraz Island, and at Wounded Knee.Believing in an empire of liberty for all, Native Americans pressed the United States to honor its obligations at home and abroad. Like African Americans, twentieth-century Native Americans served as a visible symbol of an America searching for rights and justice. American history is incomplete without their story.
Table of Contents
List of Abbreviationsp. vii
Prologue: An Empire for Libertyp. 1
Westward the Course of Empirep. 12
The Defense of the Reservationp. 42
World War II Battlegroundsp. 71
The Cold War on the Indian Frontierp. 109
Nation Building at Home and Abroadp. 161
The Indian Warp. 221
Epiloge: Indian Country in the Twenty-first Centuryp. 276
List of Archival Sourcesp. 285
Notesp. 287
Acknowledgmentsp. 348
Indexp. 351
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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