Catalogue


Rebranding rule [electronic resource] : images of restoration and revolution monarchy, 1660-1714 /
Kevin Sharpe.
imprint
New Haven : Yale University Press, [2013]
description
xxi, 849 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
ISBN
0300162014 (cl : alk. paper), 9780300162011 (cl : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
More Details
imprint
New Haven : Yale University Press, [2013]
isbn
0300162014 (cl : alk. paper)
9780300162011 (cl : alk. paper)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
contents note
Introduction: Representing restored monarchy. -- Re-presenting and reconstituting kingship. Rewriting royalty ; Redrawing regality ; Rituals of restored majesty ; A changed culture, divided kingdom and contested kingship. -- Confessional kingship? Representations of James II. Prologue: A king represented and misrepresented ; A king of many words ; A popish face? Images of James II ; Staging Catholic kingship ; Countering 'Catholic kingship' and contesting revolution. -- Representing revolution. Prologue: An image revolution? ; Scripting the revolution ; Figuring revolution ; A king off the stage ; Rival representations. -- Representing Stuart queenship. Prologue: Semper Eadem? Queen Anne ; A Stuart's words: Queen Anne and the scripts of post-revolution monarchy ; Re-depicting female rule: The image of the queen ; Stuart Rituals: Queen Anne and the performance of monarchy ; Party contest and the queen.
abstract
"In the climactic part of his three-book series exploring the importance of public image in the Tudor and Stuart monarchies, Kevin Sharpe employs a remarkable interdisciplinary approach that draws on literary studies and art history as well as political, cultural, and social history to show how this preoccupation with public representation met the challenge of dealing with the aftermath of Cromwell's interregnum and Charles II's restoration, and how the irrevocably changed cultural landscape was navigated by the sometimes astute yet equally fallible Stuart monarchs and their successors."--
catalogue key
11953369
 
Includes bibliographical references (pages 682-818) and index.
A Look Inside
Reviews
Review Quotes
"Like many works not yet in the publication pipeline at the time of the author's death, it could easily have been lost to us if Sharpe's friend and colleague Mark Knights had not seen it through its final stages. We all owe Knights a debt of gratitude, both because of the book's quality and the fact that it is a fitting monument to one of the foremost historians of the early modern world." "Sharpe writes beautifully and the book is a long, lush walk through the public rituals of monarchy, the depiction of monarchs by artists and hack engravers, wordsmiths and preachers. Sharpe clearly enjoyed exploring the nuances of this world of physical and allegorical spectacle and offers a wealth of examples to illustrate his argument. And it is a convincing one." "This reviewer . . . was left dazzled and admiring of the wonderful scholarship that [Sharpe] displays and the insights that he offers [and] . . . is to be recommended to any student of the period. It will be the starting point for any consideration of the cultural presentation of the earl modern English monarchy or the foreseeable future."Daniel Szechi, BBC History Magazine
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Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
In this climactic part of his three-book series exploring the importance of public image in the Tudor and Stuart monarchies, Kevin Sharpe employs a remarkable interdisciplinary approach that draws on literary studies and art history as well as political, cultural, and social history to show how this preoccupation with public representation met the challenge of dealing with the aftermath of Cromwell's interregnum and Charles II's restoration, and how the irrevocably changed cultural landscape was navigated by the sometimes astute yet equally fallible Stuart monarchs and their successors.
Main Description
In the climactic part of his three-book series exploring the importance of public image in the Tudor and Stuart monarchies, Kevin Sharpe employs a remarkable interdisciplinary approach that draws on literary studies and art history as well as political, cultural, and social history to show how this preoccupation with public representation met the challenge of dealing with the aftermath of Cromwell's interregnum and Charles II's restoration, and how the irrevocably changed cultural landscape was navigated by the sometimes astute yet equally fallible Stuart monarchs and their successors.
Table of Contents
List of Illustrationsp. vii
Forewordp. xii
Preface and Acknowledgementsp. xvi
Introduction: Representing Restored Monarchyp. 1
Re-presenting and Reconstituting Kingshipp. 9
Rewriting Royaltyp. 11
Redrawing Regalityp. 94
Rituals of Restored Majestyp. 148
A Changed Culture, Divided Kingdom and Contested Kingshipp. 194
Confessional Kingship? Representations of James IIp. 223
Prologue: A King Represented and Misrepresentedp. 225
A King of Many Wordsp. 227
A Popish Face? Images of James IIp. 265
Staging Catholic Kingshipp. 287
Countering 'Catholic Kingship' and Contesting Revolutionp. 308
Representing Revolutionp. 341
Prologue: An Image Revolution?p. 343
Scripting the Revolutionp. 353
Figuring Revolutionp. 409
A King off the Stagep. 449
Rival Representationsp. 481
Representing Stuart Queenshipp. 507
Prologue: Semper Eadem? Queen Annep. 509
A Stuart's Words: Queen Anne and the Scripts of Post-Revolution Monarchyp. 515
Re-Depicting Female Rule: The Image of the Queenp. 578
Stuart Rituals: Queen Anne and the Performance of Monarchyp. 616
Party Contest and the Queenp. 646
Epiloguep. 671
Notesp. 682
Indexp. 819
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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