Catalogue


A progress of sentiments [electronic resource] : reflections on Hume's Treatise /
Annette C. Baier.
imprint
Cambridge, MA ; London : Harvard University Press, 1994.
description
xi, 333 p.
ISBN
0674713869 (pbk), 9780674713864
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
added author
imprint
Cambridge, MA ; London : Harvard University Press, 1994.
isbn
0674713869 (pbk)
9780674713864
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
catalogue key
11953135
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 1991-11:
Baier's comprehensive analysis of Hume's Treatise invites the reader to consider portions of the Treatise that are often ignored. Provocative discussions of central aspects of the Treatise, including Hume's account of mental content, causation, personal continuity, and morality are shaped by Baier's commitment to the belief that Hume's philosophy can be properly understood only if taken in its entirety. Baier's sensitivity to Hume's project allows her to make refreshing contributions to traditional debates regarding the depth of Hume's skepticism, the extent of his emotivism, and the role reason and passion play in the formation of judgments. Baier, for instance, argues that Hume is able to avoid serious forms of skepticism by pragmatic, self-corrective means. Moreover, Baier suggests that, strictly speaking, Hume is not an emotivist morality is based on "reflective passions and corrected sentiments, and thought is as essential to them as it is to pure reasoning" (p. 180). For first-time readers of the Treatise, Baier's text serves as a useful guide; for more experienced readers, her text nicely complements Barry Stroud's Hume (CH, Mar'78). An interesting chronology, helpful notes, and an index are included. Highly recommended for advanced undergraduates and up.-H. Storl, Augustana College
Summaries
Main Description
Annette Baier's aim is to make sense of David Hume's Treatise as a whole. Hume's family motto, which appears on his bookplate, was "True to the End." Baier argues that it is not until the end of the Treatise that we get his full story about "truth and falsehood, reason and folly." By the end, we can see the cause to which Hume has been true throughout the work. Baier finds Hume's Treatise on Human Nature to be a carefully crafted literary and philosophical work which itself displays a philosophical progress of sentiments. His starting place is an overly abstract intellectualism that deliberately thrusts passions and social concerns into the background. In the three interrelated books of the Treatise , his "self-understander" proceeds through partial successes and dramatic failures to emerge with new-found optimism, expecting that the "exact knowledge" the morally self-conscious anatomist of human nature can acquire will itself improve and correct our vision of morality. Baier describes how, by turning philosophy toward human nature instead of toward God and the universe, Hume initiated a new philosophy, a broader discipline of reflection that can embrace Charles Darwin and Michel Foucault as well as William James and Sigmund Freud. Hume belongs both to our present and to our past.
Unpaid Annotation
In this work, Annette Baier argues that Hume's Treatise of Human Nature is a carefully crafted literary and philosophical work which itself displays a philosophical progress of sentiments.
Main Description
Annette Baier's aim is to make sense of David Hume's Treatise as a whole. Hume's family motto, which appears on his bookplate, was "True to the End." Baier argues that it is not until the end of the Treatise that we get his full story about "truth and falsehood, reason and folly." By the end, we can see the cause to which Hume has been true throughout the work.Baier finds Hume's Treatise of Human Nature to be a carefully crafted literary and philosophical work which itself displays a philosophical progress of sentiments. His starting place is an overly abstract intellectualism that deliberately thrusts passions and social concerns into the background. In the three interrelated books of the Treatise, his "self-understander" proceeds through partial successes and dramatic failures to emerge with new-found optimism, expecting that the "exact knowledge" the morally self-conscious anatomist of human nature can acquire will itself improve and correct our vision of morality. Baier describes how, by turning philosophy toward human nature instead of toward God and the universe, Hume initiated a new philosophy, a broader discipline of reflection that can embrace Charles Darwin and Michel Foucault as well as William James and Sigmund Freud. Hume belongs both to our present and to our past.
Main Description
Annette Baier's aim is to make sense of David Hume's Treatise as a whole. Hume's family motto, which appears on his bookplate, was "True to the End." Baier argues that it is not until the end of the Treatise that we get his full story about "truth and falsehood, reason and folly." By the end, we can see the cause to which Hume has been true throughout the work. Baier finds Hume's Treatise of Human Nature to be a carefully crafted literary and philosophical work which itself displays a philosophical progress of sentiments. His starting place is an overly abstract intellectualism that deliberately thrusts passions and social concerns into the background. In the three interrelated books of the Treatise , his "self-understander" proceeds through partial successes and dramatic failures to emerge with new-found optimism, expecting that the "exact knowledge" the morally self-conscious anatomist of human nature can acquire will itself improve and correct our vision of morality. Baier describes how, by turning philosophy toward human nature instead of toward God and the universe, Hume initiated a new philosophy, a broader discipline of reflection that can embrace Charles Darwin and Michel Foucault as well as William James and Sigmund Freud. Hume belongs both to our present and to our past.
Table of Contents
Abbreviations
Preface
Philosophy in This Careless Manner
Other Relations: The Account of Association
Customary Transitions from Causes to Effects
Necessity, Nature, Norms
The Simple Supposition of Continued Existence
Persons and the Wheel of Their Passions
The Direction of Our Conduct
The Contemplation of Character
A Catalogue of Virtues
The Laws of Nature
The Shelter of Governors
Reason and Reflection
Chronology
Notes
Index
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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