Catalogue

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Outspoken [electronic resource] : free speech stories /
Nan Levinson.
imprint
Berkeley : University of California Press, c2003.
description
xiii, 359 p.
ISBN
0520223705 (cloth : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
More Details
added author
imprint
Berkeley : University of California Press, c2003.
isbn
0520223705 (cloth : alk. paper)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
contents note
I pledge allegiance : Rick Nuccio -- A matter of conscience : Kwame Mensah -- Beyond mere dissent : Margaret Randall -- La mordaza : Daisy Sánchez -- Point of view : Susanna Styron -- That special shimmer : Annie Sprinkle -- Something to offend nearly everybody : Jan Critchley, Hans Evers, Ifé Franklin, Maxine McDonald, Denise Marika, James Montford, Michael Wilhoite -- The seduction of absolutes : Skipp Porteous -- Insubordinate : Penny Culliton -- Blame that tune : Mike Diana, Paul Kim, Richard Taylor -- What do you mean I cant́ read Playboy? : Steve Johnson -- The public trust : David Kern.
catalogue key
11952581
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 325-352) and index.
A Look Inside
Excerpts
Flap Copy
"Outspoken is heartwarming and inspiring, as it reminds us that there are people who refuse to be cowed into obedience, who maintain their resistance to war and injustice against all odds."--Howard Zinn, author of A People's History of the United States "Nan Levinson, herself one of this nation's free speech heroes, brings the First Amendment to life by telling the stories of those who have fought for the freedom we so often take for granted, but that is increasingly under attack. This book shows in funny, tragic, and lurid detail why the freedom of speech is worth fighting for."--David Cole, author of No Equal Justice "Levinson's book couldn't come at a more important time. These compelling tales are increasingly relevant now that our civil liberties are being threatened in the name of 'national security.' Outspoken should be required reading for anyone interested in preserving the freedom we've come to take for granted in the United States."--Candida Royalle, Erotic film director and President, Femme Productions, Inc. "In this imaginative and highly readable examination of dozens of provocative First Amendment controversies, Nan Levinson establishes herself as a resolute student of the role of free speech in a democratic society. This is an exceptional book about an endlessly important subject."--James O. Freedman, President Emeritus, Dartmouth College
Flap Copy
" Outspoken is heartwarming and inspiring, as it reminds us that there are people who refuse to be cowed into obedience, who maintain their resistance to war and injustice against all odds."--Howard Zinn, author of A People's History of the United States "Nan Levinson, herself one of this nation's free speech heroes, brings the First Amendment to life by telling the stories of those who have fought for the freedom we so often take for granted, but that is increasingly under attack. This book shows in funny, tragic, and lurid detail why the freedom of speech is worth fighting for."--David Cole, author of No Equal Justice "Levinson's book couldn't come at a more important time. These compelling tales are increasingly relevant now that our civil liberties are being threatened in the name of 'national security.' Outspoken should be required reading for anyone interested in preserving the freedom we've come to take for granted in the United States."--Candida Royalle, Erotic film director and President, Femme Productions, Inc. "In this imaginative and highly readable examination of dozens of provocative First Amendment controversies, Nan Levinson establishes herself as a resolute student of the role of free speech in a democratic society. This is an exceptional book about an endlessly important subject."--James O. Freedman, President Emeritus, Dartmouth College
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2004-06-01:
Journalist Levinson captures the vibrancy and cacophony of democracy through the stories of 20 protagonists who voiced discordant views and tested society's commitment to free expression. The narratives are compelling and varied, from a government official violating state secrecy, to artists pushing the borders of social convention, to a teacher assigning controversial reading, and to a firefighter reading soft porn. Unlike a number of recent books focused on litigants in notable legal battles, for example, Joseph Russomanno's Speaking Our Minds: Conversations with the People behind Landmark First Amendment Cases (CH, Nov'02), the speech recounted by Levinson's respondents did not invariably evoke official censure and lawsuits. Whether the censorship was official or private, however, the pressure applied to these outspoken characters was painful and repressive, even if sometimes quotidian or informal. Taken as a whole, these engagingly narrated personal dramas provide a remarkably panoramic view of American society through the lens of free expression issues. Although thin on philosophical analysis and legal doctrine, Levinson's reflections challenge readers to rethink their own ideas about the role of speech in democracy and in their lives. ^BSumming Up: Highly recommended. All levels. A. B. Cochran Agnes Scott College
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
PW Annex Reviews, October 2003
Choice, June 2004
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
Exploring the balance between First Amendment and other rights, such as equality, privacy and security, this volume tells the story of 20 people who refused to let anyone whittle away at their right to speak, think, create or demur as they pleased.
Long Description
With the government granting itself sweeping new surveillance powers, castigating its critics as unpatriotic, and equating differing opinions with abetting "America's enemies," free speech seems an early casualty of the war on terrorism. But as this book brilliantly demonstrates, to sacrifice our freedom of speech is to surrender the very heart and soul of America. Nan Levinson tells the stories of twenty people who refused to let anyone whittle away at their right to speak, think, create, or demur as they pleased. Among these sometimes unlikely defenders of the cause of free speech are a diplomat who disclosed secret information about government misconduct in Guatemala, a Puerto Rican journalist who risked going to prison to protect her sources, a high school teacher who discussed gays and lesbians in literature, a fireman who fought for his right to readPlayboyat work, and a former porn star who defended her performance piece as art. Caught up in conflicts that are alarming, complex, confusing, mean, or just plain silly, their cases are both emblematic and individually revealing, affording readers a rich variety of perspectives on the issues surrounding free speech debates. In an engaging, anecdotal style, Levinson explores the balance between First Amendment and other rights, such as equality, privacy, and security; the relationship among behavior, speech, and images; the tangle of suppression, marketing, and politics; and the role of dissent in our society. These issues come to vibrant life in the stories recounted inOutspoken,stories that--whether heroic or infamous, outrageous or straightforward--remind us again and again of the power of words and of the strength of a democracy of voices.
Main Description
With the government granting itself sweeping new surveillance powers, castigating its critics as unpatriotic, and equating differing opinions with abetting "America's enemies," free speech seems an early casualty of the war on terrorism. But as this book brilliantly demonstrates, to sacrifice our freedom of speech is to surrender the very heart and soul of America. Nan Levinson tells the stories of twenty people who refused to let anyone whittle away at their right to speak, think, create, or demur as they pleased. Among these sometimes unlikely defenders of the cause of free speech are a diplomat who disclosed secret information about government misconduct in Guatemala, a Puerto Rican journalist who risked going to prison to protect her sources, a high school teacher who discussed gays and lesbians in literature, a fireman who fought for his right to read Playboy at work, and a former porn star who defended her performance piece as art. Caught up in conflicts that are alarming, complex, confusing, mean, or just plain silly, their cases are both emblematic and individually revealing, affording readers a rich variety of perspectives on the issues surrounding free speech debates. In an engaging, anecdotal style, Levinson explores the balance between First Amendment and other rights, such as equality, privacy, and security; the relationship among behavior, speech, and images; the tangle of suppression, marketing, and politics; and the role of dissent in our society. These issues come to vibrant life in the stories recounted in Outspoken, stories that--whether heroic or infamous, outrageous or straightforward--remind us again and again of the power of words and of the strength of a democracy of voices.
Table of Contents
Author's Note
Acknowledgments
Introduction: A Democracy of Voices
The Powers That Be
I Pledge Allegiance
A Matter of Conscience
Beyond Mere Dissent
La Mordaza
Point of View
Freeelance Vigilantes
That Special Shimmer
Something to Offend Nearly Everybody
The Seduction of Absolutes
Insubordinate
Blame That Tune
Balancing Acts
What Do You Mean I Can't Read Playboy?
The Public Trust
Epilogue: In Other Words
Notes
Bibliography
Index
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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