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News to me [electronic resource] : adventures of an accidental journalist /
Laurie Hertzel.
imprint
Minneapolis : University of Minnesota Press, 2010.
description
206 p., [8] p. of plates : ill. ; 23 cm.
ISBN
9780816665587 (hbk. : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Subjects
personal subject
More Details
imprint
Minneapolis : University of Minnesota Press, 2010.
isbn
9780816665587 (hbk. : alk. paper)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
contents note
A storyteller is born -- Not making coffee -- Eyewitness to change -- Murder! -- On the night desk -- An accidental reporter -- Up the shore -- Reporting from Russia -- Enter Mayme -- A month in the south -- Back to Russia -- The long goodbye -- Epilogue.
catalogue key
11952192
A Look Inside
Awards
This item was nominated for the following awards:
Minnesota Book Awards, USA, 2011 : Won
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Publishers Weekly on 2010-06-21:
Much of Minneapolis Star-Tribune editor Hertzel's success can be attributed to her being in the right place at the right time in the 1970s. Bored with a part-time job shelving library books, a teenaged Hertzel applied for a job at the Duluth, Minn., News Tribune, answering phones, writing obituaries, and making coffee for the newsroom staff, most of whom were male, wore fedoras, and chain-smoked. Despite her lack of professional credentials, savvy editors loaded Hertzel with more and more responsibilities, until she found herself reporting the news during a time of extraordinary change, as a small city struggled to redefine itself after losing its manufacturing base, and its newspaper strived to adapt to declining readership. The most poignant chapters in this compelling memoir relate how Hertzel chanced upon the story of her career: in 1986 she accompanied to the USSR a group of Duluthians wanting to establish a Soviet sister city relationship. While there, she discovered a community of American expats, taken as children to Russia in the 1930s by their communist parents, some of whom were later executed. Her 2004 book, They Took My Father: Finnish Americans in Stalin's Russia made an accidental journalist an accidental author, but her storytelling abilities are no accident. (Sept.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved
Reviews
Review Quotes
"I thought journalists’ lives-aside from the stories we write about others-were ho-hum affairs. That was before I read Laurie Hertzel’s honest, engaging and witty memoir about working at her hometown newspaper in Duluth. " - Lake Superior Magazine
"Laurie is a top notch storyteller and this book is an intimate and entertaining look at a wonderful career in journalism." -Cathy Wurzer
"This affectionate and insightful memoir may recount Laurie Hertzel's days at the Duluth News Tribune but it will resonate with anyone who has loved newspapers and newspaper reporting." -Louise Keirnan
This item was reviewed in:
Publishers Weekly, June 2010
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Main Description
Laurie Hertzel wasn't yet a teenager in Duluth, Minnesota, when she started her first newspaper, which she appropriately christened Newspaper . Complete with the most sensational headlines of the day-MARGO FLUEGEL HAS ANOTHER BIRTHDAY!-and with healthy competition from her little brothers and their rival publication, Magapaper (a magazine and a newspaper), this venture would become Hertzel's first step toward realizing what her heart was already set on: journalism as her future. News to Me is the adventurous story of Hertzel's journey into the bustling world of print journalism in the mid-1970s, a time when copy was still banged out on typewriters by chain-smoking men in fedoras and everybody read the paper. A coming-of-age tale in more ways than one, Hertzel's eighteen-year career at the Duluth News Tribune began when journalism was a predominantly male profession. And while the newspaper trade was booming, Duluth had fallen on difficult times as factories closed and more and more people moved away. Hertzel describes her climb up the ranks of the paper against the backdrop of a Midwestern city during a time of extraordinary change. She was there during major events like the Congdon murders, the establishment of the BWCA, and the rise of Indian treaty rights, and eventually follows the biggest story of her life to Soviet Russia-and completely blows her deadline. Written with the insight and humor of someone who makes a living telling stories, News to Me is the chronicle of a small-city newspaper on the cusp of transformation, an affectionate portrait of Duluth and its people, and the account of a talented, persistent journalist who witnessed it all and was changing right along with it-whether she wanted to or not. (Oh, Newspaper doggedly outlasted the full-color Magapaper ).
Main Description
Laurie Hertzel wasn't yet a teenager in Duluth, Minnesota, when she started her first newspaper, which she appropriately christened Newspaper. Complete with the most sensational headlines of the day-MARGO FLUEGEL HAS ANOTHER BIRTHDAY!-and with healthy competition from her little brothers and their rival publication,Magapaper(a magazine and a newspaper), this venture would become Hertzel's first step toward realizing what her heart was already set on: journalism as her future. News to Meis the adventurous story of Hertzel's journey into the bustling world of print journalism in the mid-1970s, a time when copy was still banged out on typewriters by chain-smoking men in fedoras and everybody read the paper. A coming-of-age tale in more ways than one, Hertzel's eighteen-year career at theDuluth News Tribunebegan when journalism was a predominantly male profession. And while the newspaper trade was booming, Duluth had fallen on difficult times as factories closed and more and more people moved away. Hertzel describes her climb up the ranks of the paper against the backdrop of a Midwestern city during a time of extraordinary change. She was there during major events like the Congdon murders, the establishment of the BWCA, and the rise of Indian treaty rights, and eventually follows the biggest story of her life to Soviet Russia-and completely blows her deadline. Written with the insight and humor of someone who makes a living telling stories,News to Meis the chronicle of a small-city newspaper on the cusp of transformation, an affectionate portrait of Duluth and its people, and the account of a talented, persistent journalist who witnessed it all and was changing right along with it-whether she wanted to or not. (Oh, Newspaper doggedly outlasted the full-color Magapaper).
Table of Contents
A Storyteller is Bornp. 1
Not Making Coffeep. 9
Eyewitness to Changep. 25
Murder!p. 37
On the Night Deskp. 53
An Accidental Reporterp. 73
Up the Shorep. 87
Reporting from Russiap. 113
Enter Maymep. 131
A Month in the Southp. 149
Back to Russiap. 169
The Long Goodbyep. 189
Epiloguep. 201
Acknowledgmentsp. 205
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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