Catalogue


The memoirs of Walter Bagehot [electronic resource] /
Frank Prochaska.
imprint
New Haven : Yale University Press, [2013]
description
xii, 207 pages ; 23 cm
ISBN
9780300195545 (cl : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
New Haven : Yale University Press, [2013]
isbn
9780300195545 (cl : alk. paper)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
general note
Includes index.
catalogue key
11951691
A Look Inside
Reviews
Review Quotes
"A brief and eminently readable introduction to a stimulating writer and thinker, a man for whom the term 'public intellectual' may have been coined."-Gertrude Himmelfarb, The Weekly Standard
"[Prochaska] has done a remarkable job . . . What he has accomplished is a quiet tour de force , often tightening and (if it is permitted to say so) improving on the original . . . Frank Prochaska has shone an agreeable and revelatory light upon this great Victorian writer by an artful deployment of literary mirrors, not lanterns. The Memoirs of Walter Bagehot is a testimony not only to his command of the Bagehot oeuvre but also to his deep understanding of Bagehot's curious place in the pantheon of that endangered species, the man of letters."-Roger Kimball, Literary Review
"[Prochaska] has done a remarkable job . . . What he has accomplished is a quiet tour de force , often tightening and (if it is permitted to say so) improving on the original . . . Frank Prochaska has shone an agreeable and revelatory light upon this great Victorian writer by an artful deployment of literary mirrors, not lanterns. The Memoirs of Walter Bagehot is a testimony not only to his command of the Bagehot oeuvre but also to his deep understanding of Bagehot's curious place in the pantheon of that endangered species, the man of letters."Roger Kimball, Literary Review
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Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
Walter Bagehot (1826-1877) was a prominent Victorian lawyer, businessman, essayist, and journalist. A faux autobiography allows for considerable licence, but Prochaska remains true to Bagehot's character and accurate in his depiction of the times. The memoir immerses us in the spirit of the Victorian era and makes us wish to have known Walter Bagehot.
Main Description
Walter Bagehot (1826-1877) was a prominent English journalist, banker, and man of letters. For many years he was editor of "The Economist," and to this day the magazine includes a weekly "Bagehot" column. His analyses of politics, economics, and public affairs were nothing short of brilliant. Sadly, he left no memoir. How, then, does this book bear the title, "The Memoirs of Walter Bagehot"? Frank Prochaska explains, "Given my longstanding interest in Bagehots life and times, I decided to compose a memoir on his behalf." And so, in this imaginative reconstruction of the memoir Bagehot might have written, Prochaska assumes his subjects voice, draws on his extensive writings (Bagehots "Collected Works "fill 15 volumes), and scrupulously avoids what Bagehot considered that most unpardonable of faults--dullness. A faux autobiography allows for considerable license, but Prochaska remains true to Bagehots character and is accurate in his depiction of the times. The memoir immerses us in the spirit of the Victorian era and makes us wish to have known Walter Bagehot. He is, Prochaska observes, the Victorian with whom we would most want to have dinner.
Main Description
Walter Bagehot (1826--1877) was a prominent English journalist, banker, and man of letters. For many years he was editor of The Economist , and to this day the magazine includes a weekly "Bagehot" column. His analyses of politics, economics, and public affairs were nothing short of brilliant. Sadly, he left no memoir. How, then, does this book bear the title, The Memoirs of Walter Bagehot ? Frank Prochaska explains, "Given my longstanding interest in Bagehot's life and times, I decided to compose a memoir on his behalf." And so, in this imaginative reconstruction of the memoir Bagehot might have written, Prochaska assumes his subject's voice, draws on his extensive writings (Bagehot's Collected Works fill 15 volumes), and scrupulously avoids what Bagehot considered that most unpardonable of faults--dullness. A faux autobiography allows for considerable license, but Prochaska remains true to Bagehot's character and is accurate in his depiction of the times. The memoir immerses us in the spirit of the Victorian era and makes us wish to have known Walter Bagehot. He is, Prochaska observes, the Victorian with whom we would most want to have dinner.

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