Catalogue


Knocking on the door [electronic resource] : the federal government's attempt to desegregate the suburbs /
Christopher Bonastia.
imprint
Princeton, N.J. : Princeton University Press, c2006.
description
xi, 234 p. ; 25 cm.
ISBN
0691119341 (cloth : alk. paper), 9780691119342 (cloth : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Princeton, N.J. : Princeton University Press, c2006.
isbn
0691119341 (cloth : alk. paper)
9780691119342 (cloth : alk. paper)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
contents note
Residential segregation : the forgotten civil rights issue -- The divergence of civil rights policies in housing, education, and employment -- The federal government and residential segregation, 1866-1968 -- Conviction and controversy : HUD formulates its fair housing policies -- Indirect attack : a housing freeze kills civil rights efforts -- The recent past, present and future of residential desegregation.
catalogue key
11951031
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [207]-225) and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2006-12-01:
Why have federal efforts at housing desegregation been less successful than struggles against school and job discrimination? In a thoughtful comparison of the responsible federal agencies, Bonastia (CUNY) contends that the "institutional home" in which a desegregation task was placed is crucial. Thus, despite white backlash and a lack of political will, the Office of Civil Rights (education), the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, and the Office of Federal Contract Compliance (labor) had more flexibility to aggressively pursue their agendas than did the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) in housing efforts. Conflicting institutional goals hampered the latter, especially the emphasis on producing housing, the conservative banking and real estate industries, and a history of HUD support of segregation. Corruption did not help either. Civil rights victories required a lucky mix of judicial reinforcement, motivated employees, activist group support, and creative expansion of administrative practices. Bonastia also presents successful federal programs that move people from housing projects to suburbia, and discusses the continuing high costs of segregation that limit educational and job opportunities. Occasionally repetitive, the book clearly lays out choices and the consequences of desegregation efforts. ^BSumming Up: Highly recommended. Collections in housing and public policy, graduate level and up. S. D. Borchert emeritus, Lake Erie College
Reviews
Review Quotes
"Why have federal efforts at housing desegregation been less successful than struggles against school and job discrimination? In a thoughtful comparison of the responsible federal agencies, Bonastia contends that the institutional home in which a desegregation task was placed is crucial. . . . [Knocking on the Door] clearly lays out choices and the consequences of desegregation efforts. Highly recommended."-- S. D. Borchert, Choice
Why have federal efforts at housing desegregation been less successful than struggles against school and job discrimination? In a thoughtful comparison of the responsible federal agencies, Bonastia contends that the 'institutional home' in which a desegregation task was placed is crucial. . . . [Knocking on the Door] clearly lays out choices and the consequences of desegregation efforts. Highly recommended.
This book provides a fascinating look at the details and nuances of public policy history during the Civil Rights era and deepens our understanding of the consequences of institutional arrangements for the effectiveness of social policy. The book is thus relevant to scholars of social change, institutions, and racial stratification. . . . This work offers valuable insight into the federal role in perpetuating segregation and the institutional forces limiting social change.
"This book provides a fascinating look at the details and nuances of public policy history during the Civil Rights era and deepens our understanding of the consequences of institutional arrangements for the effectiveness of social policy. The book is thus relevant to scholars of social change, institutions, and racial stratification. . . . This work offers valuable insight into the federal role in perpetuating segregation and the institutional forces limiting social change."-- Chenoa Flippen, American Journal of Sociology
"I found this book to be useful and informative. . . . [It demonstrates] why a results-oriented approach to civil-rights enforcement was not undertaken in housing, as it was, for a time, in education and employment. . . . Bonastia makes a convincing argument that, with a different type of enforcement agency combating housing discrimination, progress could have been greater than it was."-- John E. Farley, Contexts
I found this book to be useful and informative. . . . [It demonstrates] why a results-oriented approach to civil-rights enforcement was not undertaken in housing, as it was, for a time, in education and employment. . . . Bonastia makes a convincing argument that, with a different type of enforcement agency combating housing discrimination, progress could have been greater than it was.
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, December 2006
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Main Description
Knocking on the Door is the first book-length work to analyze federal involvement in residential segregation from Reconstruction to the present. Providing a particularly detailed analysis of the period 1968 to 1973, the book examines how the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) attempted to forge elementary changes in segregated residential patterns by opening up the suburbs to groups historically excluded for racial or economic reasons. The door did not shut completely on this possibility until President Richard Nixon took the drastic step of freezing all federal housing funds in January 1973. Knocking on the Door assesses this near-miss in political history, exploring how HUD came surprisingly close to implementing rigorous antidiscrimination policies, and why the agency's efforts were derailed by Nixon. Christopher Bonastia shows how the Nixon years were ripe for federal action to foster residential desegregation. The period was marked by new legislative protections against housing discrimination, unprecedented federal involvement in housing construction, and frequent judicial backing for the actions of civil rights agencies. By comparing housing desegregation policies to civil rights enforcement in employment and education, Bonastia offers an unrivaled account of why civil rights policies diverge so sharply in their ambition and effectiveness.
Main Description
Knocking on the Dooris the first book-length work to analyze federal involvement in residential segregation from Reconstruction to the present. Providing a particularly detailed analysis of the period 1968 to 1973, the book examines how the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) attempted to forge elementary changes in segregated residential patterns by opening up the suburbs to groups historically excluded for racial or economic reasons. The door did not shut completely on this possibility until President Richard Nixon took the drastic step of freezing all federal housing funds in January 1973.Knocking on the Doorassesses this near-miss in political history, exploring how HUD came surprisingly close to implementing rigorous antidiscrimination policies, and why the agency's efforts were derailed by Nixon. Christopher Bonastia shows how the Nixon years were ripe for federal action to foster residential desegregation. The period was marked by new legislative protections against housing discrimination, unprecedented federal involvement in housing construction, and frequent judicial backing for the actions of civil rights agencies. By comparing housing desegregation policies to civil rights enforcement in employment and education, Bonastia offers an unrivaled account of why civil rights policies diverge so sharply in their ambition and effectiveness.
Bowker Data Service Summary
By comparing housing desegregation policies to civil rights enforcement in employment and education, this text offers an account of why civil rights policies diverge so sharply in their ambition and effectiveness.
Table of Contents
Prefacep. ix
List of Abbreviations for Frequently Cited Government Agencies and Commissionsp. xiii
Residential Segregation The Forgotten Civil Rights Issuep. 1
The Divergence of Civil Rights Policies in Housing, Education, and Employmentp. 25
The Federal Government and Residential Segregation, 1866-1968p. 57
Conviction and Controversy HUD Formulates Its Fair Housing Policiesp. 9
Indirect Attack A Housing Freeze Kills Civil Rights Effortsp. 121
The Recent Past, Present, and Future of Residential Desegregationp. 144
List of Abbreviations for Notesp. 167
Notesp. 169
Works Citedp. 207
Indexp. 227
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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