Catalogue


Britons [electronic resource] : forging the nation, 1707-1837 /
Linda Colley.
edition
Rev. ed., with new introductory essay.
imprint
New Haven : Yale University Press, 2009.
description
xxxi, 442 p. : ill., map ; 24 cm.
ISBN
9780300152807 (pbk.)
format(s)
Book
More Details
imprint
New Haven : Yale University Press, 2009.
isbn
9780300152807 (pbk.)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
catalogue key
11947706
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [394]-425) and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Born in Britain, Linda Colley has taught and written on history and current events on both sides of the Atlantic. Previously at Cambridge, Yale and the London School of Economics, she is now Shelby M. C. Davis 1958 Professor of History at Princeton University.
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Library Journal on 1992-09:
During the 120 years covered by this book, the Scots, Welsh, English, and to some extent the Irish began to think of themselves as Britons. Many forces combined to create this new identity in the minds of these people. One of the most important was the almost-constant warfare against France, and hence the need for protected shipping made British identity an economic advantage for the Scots. Fear of invasion and the need for soldiers helped expand the roles of ordinary men and women and at the same time increased their feelings of patriotism. Colley has reinterpreted some old theories and offers evidence to support her views. She also shows that some changes that seem to have been sudden actually were part of the logical progression of these early movements. Recommended for academic and large public libraries.-- Marilyn Dailey, Natrona Cty. P.L., Casper, Wyo. (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.
Appeared in Choice on 1993-04:
The subject here is Augustan England, which Colley (Yale) sees not as a limited monarchy or oligarchy, but as a strongly nationalistic state. Old antipathies among the English, Welsh, and Scots were largely submerged, she feels, to form a new British nationalism in support of the London regime. She examines a number of unifying symbols and experiences: Protestantism, commerce, the monarchy, women's "separate sphere," and above all war. "This is a culture that is used to fighting and which has largely defined itself through fighting." By 1837, Colley contends, this resulted in a "unitary political discourse" that has lasted pretty much until today. Indeed, she concludes that the passing of these formative symbols and experiences in recent decades has done much to dissolve the British bond and to revive the separate identities of the island's three nations. Although based on extensive scholarship, Britons wears it lightly. Colley's prose is breezy and accessible, and her extensive and integral commentary on contemporary images political caricatures, portraits, historical paintings is exemplary. Highly recommended for libraries at all levels. J. R. Breihan; Loyola College
Summaries
Main Description
How was Great Britain made? And what has it meant at different times to be British?
Main Description
How was Great Britain made? And what does it mean to be British? This brilliant and seminal book examines how a more cohesive British nation was invented after 1707 and how this new national identity was nurtured through war, religion, trade, and empire. Lavishly illustrated and powerful, Britons remains a major contribution to our understanding of Britain's past, and continues to influence ongoing controversies about this polity's survival and future. This edition contains an extensive new preface by the author. "A sweeping survey, . . . evocatively illustrated and engagingly written."--Harriet Ritvo, New York Times Book Review "Challenging, fascinating, enormously well informed."--John Barrell, London Review of Books "Linda Colley writes with clarity and grace...Her stimulating book will be, and deserves to be influential"--E. P. Thompson, Dissent Linda Colley is Shelby M. C. Davis 1958 Professor of History at Princeton University. Winner of the Wolfson History Prize A New York Times NotableBook
Bowker Data Service Summary
Linda Colley's comprehensive study of national identity is a major work that contributes to our understanding of Britain's past and to the growing debate about the shape and survival of Britain and its institutions in the future.
Main Description
How was Great Britain made? And what does it mean to be British? This brilliant and seminal book examines how a more cohesive British nation was invented after 1707 and how this new national identity was nurtured through war, religion, trade, and empire. Lavishly illustrated and powerful,Britonsremains a major contribution to our understanding of Britain's past, and continues to influence ongoing controversies about this polity's survival and future. This edition contains an extensive new preface by the author. "A sweeping survey, . . . evocatively illustrated and engagingly written."Harriet Ritvo,New York Times Book Review "Challenging, fascinating, enormously well informed."John Barrell,London Review of Books "Linda Colley writes with clarity and grace...Her stimulating book will be, and deserves to be influential"E. P. Thompson,Dissent Linda Colley is Shelby M. C. Davis 1958 Professor of History at Princeton University. Winner of the Wolfson History Prize ANew York TimesNotableBook
Table of Contents
Acknowledgementsp. ix
Britons Re-visitedp. xi
Introductionp. 1
Protestantsp. 11
A less than united kingdomp. 11
The struggles of God's electp. 19
Jerusalem the goldenp. 30
A polity by force of faithp. 44
Profitsp. 55
Land, trade, war and empirep. 56
Jacobitism and the economics of loyaltyp. 72
Investing in the nationp. 86
The price of it allp. 99
Peripheriesp. 102
New landmarksp. 103
John Wilkes and Englishnessp. 105
A Scottish empire?p. 118
America and the revolution in British sensibilitiesp. 134
Dominancep. 149
Crisis of an orderp. 152
The making of the British ruling classp. 158
The cultural reconstruction of an elitep. 167
Heroes of their own epicp. 180
Majestyp. 199
A royal culture confinedp. 200
Why George III was differentp. 209
The mechanics of royal celebrationp. 221
Meanings and magicp. 233
Womanpowerp. 242
Beating against the bonds of womanhoodp. 244
War and the sexesp. 256
Making separate spheres work for womenp. 268
A woman's place is in the nationp. 278
Manpowerp. 289
A nation in armsp. 292
Who was willing to fight?p. 297
The private reasons whyp. 306
The politics of popular commitmentp. 315
Victories?p. 327
Catholic emancipation and divisionp. 330
Parliamentary reform and compromisep. 341
Slavery, freedom and consensusp. 357
A nation redefined and undefinedp. 368
Conclusionsp. 372
Appendicesp. 385
The Geography of Loyalty in 1745p. 386
Men at Arms throughout Great Britain, May 1804p. 388
Volunteers and their Chosen Sphere of Action in 1798p. 391
Notesp. 394
Photograph Acknowledgementsp. 426
Indexp. 427
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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