Catalogue


The Advent project [electronic resource] : the later-seventh-century creation of the Roman Mass proper /
James W. McKinnon.
imprint
Berkeley : University of California Press, c2000.
description
xiv, 466 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0520221982 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
More Details
imprint
Berkeley : University of California Press, c2000.
isbn
0520221982 (alk. paper)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
catalogue key
11946926
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 445-454) and index.
A Look Inside
Excerpts
Flap Copy
"In this study in 'musical archeology,' James McKinnon reveals one of the most important layers in the early development of Gregorian chant. With equal attention to musical and ritual practicalities, McKinnon applies an unusual combination of scholary skill and sensitivity to reconstruct how words and melodies might have been assigned to the whole church year, beginning with Advent. If liturgy is 'people doing things for which they have forgotten the reasons,' McKinnon shows us some of the reasons for the creation of the Gregorgian Proper chants of the mass."--Richard Crocker, author ofAn Introduction to Gregorian Chant "[It] is so richly imagined and so well supported with facts and argument that the reader is compelled by its plausibility even while remembering that (s)he is peering behind what has often been depicted as an impenetrable curtain. McKinnon uses his exceptional knowledge of the sources of late antiquity, common sense, imagination and persistent belief that the story ought to make sense to piece together the history of Christian chant from 200 to 800 as one might piece together the shards of a hopelessly smashed ancient artifact. The results are simply stunning."--Edward Nowacki, University of Cincinnati "Simply one of the half-dozen most important works of chant scholarship in the entire twentieth century. The scholarship in the book is not just superior. It borders on the inspired."--Alejandro Planchart, editor of theBeneventanum Troporum Corpus
Flap Copy
"In this study in 'musical archeology,' James McKinnon reveals one of the most important layers in the early development of Gregorian chant. With equal attention to musical and ritual practicalities, McKinnon applies an unusual combination of scholary skill and sensitivity to reconstruct how words and melodies might have been assigned to the whole church year, beginning with Advent. If liturgy is 'people doing things for which they have forgotten the reasons,' McKinnon shows us some of the reasons for the creation of the Gregorgian Proper chants of the mass."--Richard Crocker, author of An Introduction to Gregorian Chant "[It] is so richly imagined and so well supported with facts and argument that the reader is compelled by its plausibility even while remembering that (s)he is peering behind what has often been depicted as an impenetrable curtain. McKinnon uses his exceptional knowledge of the sources of late antiquity, common sense, imagination and persistent belief that the story ought to make sense to piece together the history of Christian chant from 200 to 800 as one might piece together the shards of a hopelessly smashed ancient artifact. The results are simply stunning."--Edward Nowacki, University of Cincinnati "Simply one of the half-dozen most important works of chant scholarship in the entire twentieth century. The scholarship in the book is not just superior. It borders on the inspired."--Alejandro Planchart, editor of the Beneventanum Troporum Corpus
Summaries
Long Description
In his final accomplishment of an extraordinarily distinguished career, James W. McKinnon considers the musical practices of the early Church in this incisive examination of the history of Christian chant from the years a.d. 200 to 800. The result is an important book that is certain to have a long-lasting impact on musicology, religious studies, and history.
Main Description
This book is a completely new interpretation of how Gregorian chant developed and spread throughout Europe, based on a lifetime of authoritative research. This book represents a breakthrough in chant scholarship, and will have a lasting impact on the history of music.
Table of Contents
Tablesp. ix
Acknowledgmentsp. xi
Introductionp. 1
The Prehistoryp. 17
The First Centuriesp. 19
The Later Fourth Centuryp. 35
Centuries of Silence: Gaulp. 60
Centuries of Silence: Rome and Englandp. 77
The Seventh-Century Roman Backgroundp. 99
Sacramentary, Lectionary and Antiphonerp. 101
Advent and the Thursdays in Lentp. 125
The Sanctoralep. 154
The Advent Projectp. 193
The Introitp. 195
The Gradualp. 222
The Alleluiap. 249
The Tractp. 280
The Offertoryp. 298
The Communionp. 326
The Creation of the Roman Mass Properp. 356
Epilogue: The Central Question of Gregorian Chantp. 375
Notesp. 405
Works Citedp. 445
Indexp. 455
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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