Catalogue

COVID-19: Updates on library services and operations.

Riding the Indian tiger [electronic resource] : understanding India--the world's fastest growing market /
William Nobrega, Ashish Sinha.
imprint
Hoboken, N.J. : J. Wiley & Sons, c2008.
description
xvi, p. : ill., map ; 24 cm.
ISBN
9780470183274 (cloth)
format(s)
Book
More Details
added author
imprint
Hoboken, N.J. : J. Wiley & Sons, c2008.
isbn
9780470183274 (cloth)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
contents note
The largest market the world has ever seen -- Bulls & bears in Mumbai : India's financial markets -- Why India will outperform China -- The road less traveled : India's infrastructure opportunity -- The next wave : beyond IT & outsourcing -- Look before you leap -- Understanding the Indian business culture.
catalogue key
11933802
A Look Inside
Excerpts
Flap Copy
Business strategies for tapping into the worlda's fastest-growing economy Wal-Mart, GE, and Microsoft have all opened major operations in India, while Shell and General Motors have invested in about 3,000 new factories on the subcontinent. Why are these titanic companies pouring funds into a country known for its slow economic growth? Because today there is a new India.The new India is a raging tiger in todaya's world economy that may unseat China as Asiaa's largest economic superpower. Shedding its socialist-dominated government of the twentieth century, India has embraced capitalism, as large private equity funds and a healthy middle class expand at a breakneck speed. Riding the Indian Tiger explains how business works in the new India, including: A detailed profile of Indiaa's financial markets Indian business culture Why India will outperform China in the coming years Indiaa's improving infrastructure What lies beyond IT and outsourcing A clear forecast of the opportunities ahead Indiaa's long history of Western economic domination is over. It has finally overcome the legacy of Nehru, whose socialist policies stunted economic growth, modernization, and global competitiveness for forty years. Detailed and informative, Riding the Indian Tiger explains the rules for succeeding in Indiaa's burgeoning market.
Flap Copy
Business strategies for tapping into the world's fastest-growing economy Wal-Mart, GE, and Microsoft have all opened major operations in India, while Shell and General Motors have invested in about 3,000 new factories on the subcontinent. Why are these titanic companies pouring funds into a country known for its slow economic growth? Because today there is a new India. The new India is a raging tiger in today's world economy that may unseat China as Asia's largest economic superpower. Shedding its socialist-dominated government of the twentieth century, India has embraced capitalism, as large private equity funds and a healthy middle class expand at a breakneck speed. Riding the Indian Tiger explains how business works in the new India, including: A detailed profile of India's financial markets Indian business culture Why India will outperform China in the coming years India's improving infrastructure What lies beyond IT and outsourcing A clear forecast of the opportunities ahead India's long history of Western economic domination is over. It has finally overcome the legacy of Nehru, whose socialist policies stunted economic growth, modernization, and global competitiveness for forty years. Detailed and informative, Riding the Indian Tiger explains the rules for succeeding in India's burgeoning market.
Flap Copy
Business strategies for tapping into the world's fastest-growing economyWal-Mart, GE, and Microsoft have all opened major operations in India, while Shell and General Motors have invested in about 3,000 new factories on the subcontinent. Why are these titanic companies pouring funds into a country known for its slow economic growth? Because today there is a new India.The new India is a raging tiger in today's world economy that may unseat China as Asia's largest economic superpower. Shedding its socialist-dominated government of the twentieth century, India has embraced capitalism, as large private equity funds and a healthy middle class expand at a breakneck speed.Riding the Indian Tiger explains how business works in the new India, including:A detailed profile of India's financial marketsIndian business cultureWhy India will outperform China in the coming yearsIndia's improving infrastructureWhat lies beyond IT and outsourcingA clear forecast of the opportunities aheadIndia's long history of Western economic domination is over. It has finally overcome the legacy of Nehru, whose socialist policies stunted economic growth, modernization, and global competitiveness for forty years.Detailed and informative, Riding the Indian Tiger explains the rules for succeeding in India's burgeoning market.
Reviews
Review Quotes
"The author gives individuals and organizations a detailed picture of the economic opportunities India has to offer." Finance & Management Faculty July 2008
"If you're an investor, you need to know about India. Unfortunately, before Riding the Indian Tiger came out, snappy, all-in-one primers on India's past, present and future had been hard to come by. The list of companies that do business with India includes the likes of Sony (SNE - Cramer's Take - Stockpickr), Gap (GPS - Cramer's Take - Stockpickr), Microsoft (MSFT - Cramer's Take - Stockpickr), General Electric (GE - Cramer's Take - Stockpickr) and Wal-Mart(WMT - Cramer's Take - Stockpickr). But the list of investors with experience in India, who know its regions, tendencies and opportunities, is short. And much of what is written about the country falls into one of two unhelpful categories: political bombast declaring that India is ever-powerful and will sink America, and the business hype jobs that call India a source of evergreen profit for the average investor. What has seemed lacking, until now, is a balanced and digestible overview that tells a bit about India's history, a bit about its regions, a bit about how it compares with China and thoughts on its future. Riding the Indian Tiger: Understanding India -- The World's Fastest Growing Market, (Wiley) by William Nobrega and Ashish Sinha is a must-read and earns a coveted Business Press Maven "Help" label, granted with great ceremony to books that help advance investor understanding. It is not a thrilling read, but the prose isn't wooden, and it's less than 250 pages. That means no excuses. And here's the beautiful part: Place your finger down at random at almost any point in this book, and you'll learn something important, thought-provoking or, at the very least, interesting about a country that stands as a contradiction in a myriad of ways. Where to start? Well, anywhere. How about page 12, part of the opening section that gives an economic tour of India's different regions? Haryana, close to New Delhi, is an agrarian state with a dairy bent, a fast-growing economy and an essential long-term challenge: With an underdeveloped supply chain and little of the milk pasteurized, potential lost revenue abounds. Or, read any of the pages between 67 and 92, where the authors compare India and China, point to any number of examples of the free press in India leading to better oversight and less corruption or the overwhelming demographic advantages enjoyed by India. The authors also argue that fashion apparel will thrive in the near future in India because of the nation's cotton production, technological advances of its textile industry, and increasing disposable income. National fashion producers are not sufficiently up to the task; the authors smell big opportunity. For some similar reasons and others quite separate, the hotel industry also is ripe for growth, according to the authors. Skip to page 203, in a section on understanding Indian business culture, and you'll learn about the Indian businessman's disinclination to say "no," which often causes disappointment when deadlines pass. This, the authors say, is changing. The introduction, an overview of India's history, which has lurched between colonialism, socialism and now capitalism, is a bit less subjective but probably just as important for anyone who needs a quick sense of this emerging economic behemoth. Don't skip it. ... The book, while not a scintillating read in terms of structure or prose, is filled with insight and factoids that will help you emerge, after less than 250 pages, far more knowledgeable about India than you'd be from reading what else is available on the topic. " -- Review from TheStreet.com
This item was reviewed in:
Reference & Research Book News, May 2008
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Back Cover Copy
"India is not the next China but China-plus-more successful with greater political stability and more rapid economic growth. The evidence is here. So are the Indian companies that are driving its transformation-and the failures and successes of foreign companies that are trying to ride the tiger. The lessons from their experiences are spelled out for everyone interested in the Indian boom." -MARVIN ZONIS, Professor, Graduate School of Business, The University of Chicago "For many centuries, explorers tried to ride the Indian tiger, with little knowledge or respect for this incredibly complex civilization and its values. A new group of explorers, the international business community, is now trying again. This book powerfully explains the naivet_ of trying to do business in India without an appreciation of the risks and rewards and the cultural challenges. India's history, politics, and caste system influence its huge market in fascinating ways. Enjoy the reading and the ride." -PAULO CALDEIRA, venture capitalist "Riding the Indian Tiger is valuable for a businessperson interested in the new India, and especially for the business traveler." -GURCHARAN DAS, author of India Unbound
Main Description
In 2008, India will likely overtake China as the world's fastest growing economy and become one of the largest economies globally. Foreign investment is increasing dramatically and business opportunities abound for those who know how to find them. With a growing middle class and booming markets, India holds much promise for investors. Riding the Indian Tiger shows you how to get in on the ground floor and profit from India's economic boom.
Table of Contents
Prefacep. vii
Introduction: The History of India in Eight Pagesp. ix
The Largest Market the World Has Ever Seenp. 3
Bulls and Bears in Mumbai: India's Financial Marketsp. 29
Why India Will Outperform Chinap. 65
The Road Less Traveled: The Gold That Lies under India's Crumbling Infrastructurep. 93
The Next Wave: What Will Drive India's Growth After Information Technology and Outsourcingp. 117
Look Before You Leapp. 173
Understanding the Indian Business Culturep. 197
Conclusion: The Tiger Begins to Roarp. 231
Acknowledgmentsp. 239
Indexp. 241
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

This information is provided by a service that aggregates data from review sources and other sources that are often consulted by libraries, and readers. The University does not edit this information and merely includes it as a convenience for users. It does not warrant that reviews are accurate. As with any review users should approach reviews critically and where deemed necessary should consult multiple review sources. Any concerns or questions about particular reviews should be directed to the reviewer and/or publisher.

  link to old catalogue

Report a problem