Catalogue


How to be a real gay : gay identities in small-town South Africa /
Graeme Reid.
imprint
South Africa : University of KwaZulu-Natal Press, 2013.
description
xi, 306 pages, 16 unumbered pages of plates : illustrations ; 22 cm
ISBN
1869142438, 9781869142438
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
South Africa : University of KwaZulu-Natal Press, 2013.
isbn
1869142438
9781869142438
standard identifier
40022219899
contents note
Introduction: Local meets global: Small-town gay identities -- Then and now? Historical precedents and theoretical concepts -- Ladies and Gents: Gender classification and self-identification -- Hairstyling: Being feminine and fashionable -- Hairstyling as an economic niche -- How to be a "Real Gay": Workshops on identity -- "Gay" sangomas: "Traditional" or "Millennium" and Un-African? -- History and the search for identity: Can Gay be African? -- Conclusion: Country and city styles: Being traditional and modern.
abstract
"How to be a Real Gay takes its title from a series of workshops organised by gay activists in the small town of Ermelo, South Africa. Focusing on everyday practices of gayness in hair salons, churches, taverns and meeting halls, it explores the ambivalent space that homosexuality occupies in newly democratic South Africa: on the one hand, protection of gay rights is a litmus test for our Constitutional democracy, yet on the other, homosexuality is seen to threaten traditional values, customs and beliefs. This book is the first to emerge that recounts how gays in small-town South Africa negotiate this difficult symbolic terrain. How do discourses on international gay and lesbian social movements and gay equality hang together with local views on identity, gender and relationships? Why do small-town gays harness fashion, style and glamour in the making and sustaining of identity? How do economically vulnerable gays organize, access resources and create networks linking small towns to cities? How to be a Real Gay delves to the core of what it means to be other in contexts of risk, exclusion and inclusion. In its richly textured way, it also speaks to the tremendous capacity of gays to imagine and create life worlds in a harsh environment."--Publisher's website.
catalogue key
11912426
 
Includes bibliographical references (pages 286-293) and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Graeme Reid is director of the Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Rights Program at Human Rights Watch in New York. An anthropologist by training, Reid received a PhD from the University of Amsterdam. He is the author of Above the Skyline. The Reverend Tsietsi Thandekiso and the Founding of an African Gay Church.
Summaries
Main Description
How To Be a Real Gay takes its title from a series of workshops organized by gay activists in the small town of Ermelo, South Africa. Focusing on everyday practices of gayness in hair salons, churches, taverns, and meeting halls, the book explores the ambivalent space that homosexuality occupies in the newly democratic South Africa: on the one hand, protection of gay rights is a litmus test for the country's constitutional democracy, yet on the other, homosexuality is seen to threaten traditional values, customs, and beliefs. The book is the first to emerge that recounts how gays in small-town South Africa negotiate this difficult symbolic terrain. How do discourses on international gay and lesbian social movements and gay equality hang together with local views on identity, gender, and relationships? Why do small-town gays harness fashion, style, and glamour in the making and sustaining of identity? How do economically vulnerable gays organize, access resources, and create networks linking small towns to cities? How To Be a Real Gay delves to the core of what it means to be 'the other' in contexts of risk, exclusion, and inclusion. In its richly textured way, the book also speaks to the tremendous capacity of gays to imagine and create life-worlds in a harsh environment.
Library of Congress Summary
"How to be a Real Gay takes its title from a series of workshops organised by gay activists in the small town of Ermelo, South Africa. Focusing on everyday practices of gayness in hair salons, churches, taverns and meeting halls, it explores the ambivalent space that homosexuality occupies in newly democratic South Africa: on the one hand, protection of gay rights is a litmus test for our Constitutional democracy, yet on the other, homosexuality is seen to threaten traditional values, customs and beliefs. This book is the first to emerge that recounts how gays in small-town South Africa negotiate this difficult symbolic terrain. How do discourses on international gay and lesbian social movements and gay equality hang together with local views on identity, gender and relationships? Why do small-town gays harness fashion, style and glamour in the making and sustaining of identity? How do economically vulnerable gays organize, access resources and create networks linking small towns to cities? How to be a Real Gay delves to the core of what it means to be other in contexts of risk, exclusion and inclusion. In its richly textured way, it also speaks to the tremendous capacity of gays to imagine and create life worlds in a harsh environment."--Publisher's website.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgementsp. ix
Abbreviationsp. xi
Introduction: Local Meets Global: Small-Town Gay Identitiesp. 1
Then and Now: Historical Precedents and Theoretical Conceptsp. 13
Ladies and Gents: Gender Classification and Self-Identificationp. 49
Hairstyling: Being Feminine and Fashionablep. 97
Hairstyling as an Economic Nichep. 126
How to be a 'Real Gay': Workshops on Identityp. 153
'Gay' Sangomas: 'Traditional' or 'Millennium' and Un-African?p. 198
History and the Search for Identity: Can Gay be African?p. 238
Country and City Styles: Being Traditional and Modernp. 273
Select Bibliographyp. 286
Indexp. 294
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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