Catalogue


Secret trades, porous borders [electronic resource] : smuggling and states along a Southeast Asian frontier, 1865-1915 /
Eric Tagliacozzo.
imprint
New Haven : Yale University Press, c2005.
description
xvi, 437 p. : ill., maps.
ISBN
0300089686
format(s)
Book
More Details
added author
imprint
New Haven : Yale University Press, c2005.
isbn
0300089686
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
contents note
Building the frontier : drawing lines in physical space. Mapping the frontier -- Enforcing the frontier -- Strengthening the frontier -- Imagining the frontier : state visions of danger along the border. The specter of violence -- "Foreign Asians" on the frontier -- The indigenous threat -- Secret trades, porous borders. The smuggling of narcotics -- Counterfeiters across the frontier -- Illicit human cargoes -- The illegal weapons trade across the Anglo/Dutch frontier. Munitions and borders : arms in context -- Praxis and evasion : arms in motion -- A frontier story : the sorrows of Golam Merican. Contraband and the junk Kim Ban An -- Worlds of illegality, 1873-99.
catalogue key
11891205
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 377-415) and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2005-12-01:
In this scholarly volume Tagliacozzo (Cornell Univ.) analyzes the interaction between the British and Dutch colonial governments in their respective Southeast Asian spheres of influence from the mid-1860s when frontier definition began in earnest until 1915 when borders took on the shape they have today. Tagliacozzo notes that the Anglo-Dutch Treaty of 1871, which began the process, was designed to regulate and tax commerce but led inevitably to the opposite result: smuggling on a massive scale of everything from 500-year-old Ming jars to coolies, narcotics, prostitutes, and salt. People with similar languages, ethnicities, and religions, who had been "trading with each other across the Straits of Melaka for at least two thousand years," were not deterred by European regimes in Singapore and Batavia--naval patrols, armed infantry, and specialized police notwithstanding. "Smuggling and the processes of nation-state frontier formation were inherently interlinked," as Tagliacozzo's fascinating account of the Kim Ban An, a Chinese junk caught smuggling off the Aceh coast, nicely demonstrates. Contemporary Malaysia and Indonesia continue to map and define smaller and smaller details, but the frontier is still permeable, and smuggling remains pervasive. Well documented. Maps, photographs, complete bibliography. ^BSumming Up: Highly recommended. Public and academic library collections, lower-division undergraduate through faculty. W. W. Reinhardt Randolph-Macon College
Reviews
Review Quotes
"In the tradition of Fernand Braudel and Anthony Reid, Tagliacozzo understands that the navigable space between states is not only eminently worthy of its own history but is often the best way to understand state-formation. From a multitude of fugitive sources, worthy of the very smugglers he studies, Tagliacozzo brings a masterful order to the dizzying movement of commodities and people back and forth across the Sunda Straits. The patterns of history in insular Southeast Asia are best grasped from aboard ship. No better evidence exists than Tagliacozzo�s daring, richly textured, and original book."�James C. Scott, Sterling Professor of Political Science and Anthropology, Yale University
""In the tradition of Fernand Braudel and Anthony Reid, Tagliacozzo understands that the navigable space between states is not only eminently worthy of its own history but is often the best way to understand state-formation. From a multitude of fugitive sources, worthy of the very smugglers he studies, Tagliacozzo brings a masterful order to the dizzying movement of commodities and people back and forth across the Sunda Straits. The patterns of history in insular Southeast Asia are best grasped from aboard ship. No better evidence exists than Tagliacozzo's daring, richly textured, and original book."-James C. Scott, Sterling Professor of Political Science and Anthropology, Yale University""
""Secret Trades, Porous Borders "offers" "an approach excitingly free of the disciplined narrow-mindedness that so often appears inseparable from Southeast Asian studies and area studies in general. Meticulous as it is in its details of the Dutch-Indies and British-Malaya between 1865 and 1915, the book engages its reader in thinking life-sized about the modern world."--Rudolf Mrazek, University of Michigan, author of "Engineers of Happy Land "
" In the tradition of Fernand Braudel and Anthony Reid, Tagliacozzo understands that the navigable space between states is not only eminently worthy of its own history but is often the best way to understand state-formation. From a multitude of fugitive sources, worthy of the very smugglers he studies, Tagliacozzo brings a masterful order to the dizzying movement of commodities and people back and forth across the Sunda Straits. The patterns of history in insular Southeast Asia are best grasped from aboard ship. No better evidence exists than Tagliacozzo's daring, richly-textured, and original book." --James C. Scott, Sterling Professor of Political Science and Anthropology, Yale University
"By tracking the construction of modern political borders and their illicit crossing by people, objects, and ideas, this superb study reveals the ambitions and anxieties that fueled colonial state building in Southeast Asia. Tagliacozzo provides us with a masterful foray into contradictions at the heart of colonial power."Danilyn Rutherford, University of Chicago, author of Raiding the Land of the Foreigners: The Limits of the Nation on an Indonesian Frontier
"Taglicacozzo presents a new way of understanding Indonesian histories through mapping, enclosing and border crossings. He tracks the movement of drugs, women and weapons, and reveals a world of smugglers, counterfeiters and hajis who evaded, avoided or ignored colonial strictures. Tagliacozzo's account is erudite and readable."--Jean Gelman Taylor, author of "Indonesia: Peoples and Histories "
"By tracking the construction of modern political borders and their illicit crossing by people, objects, and ideas, this superb study reveals the ambitions and anxieties that fueled colonial state building in Southeast Asia. Tagliacozzo provides us with a masterful foray into contradictions at the heart of colonial power."--Danilyn Rutherford, University of Chicago, author of "Raiding the Land of the Foreigners: The Limits of the Nation on an Indonesian Frontier"
"By tracking the construction of modern political borders and their illicit crossing by people, objects, and ideas, this superb study reveals the ambitions and anxieties that fueled colonial state building in Southeast Asia. Tagliacozzo provides us with a masterful foray into contradictions at the heart of colonial power."�Danilyn Rutherford, University of Chicago, author of Raiding the Land of the Foreigners: The Limits of the Nation on an Indonesian Frontier
"Taglicacozzo presents a new way of understanding Indonesian histories through mapping, enclosing and border crossings. He tracks the movement of drugs, women and weapons, and reveals a world of smugglers, counterfeiters and hajis who evaded, avoided or ignored colonial strictures. Tagliacozzo�s account is erudite and readable."�Jean Gelman Taylor, author of Indonesia: Peoples and Histories
"By tracking the construction of modern political borders and their illicit crossing by people, objects, and ideas, this superb study reveals the ambitions and anxieties that fueled colonial state building in Southeast Asia. Tagliacozzo provides us with a masterful foray into contradictions at the heart of colonial power."Danilyn Rutherford, University of Chicago, author ofRaiding the Land of the Foreigners: The Limits of the Nation on an Indonesian Frontier
"Taglicacozzo presents a new way of understanding Indonesian histories through mapping, enclosing and border crossings. He tracks the movement of drugs, women and weapons, and reveals a world of smugglers, counterfeiters and hajis who evaded, avoided or ignored colonial strictures. Tagliacozzo's account is erudite and readable."Jean Gelman Taylor, author of Indonesia: Peoples and Histories
"Taglicacozzo presents a new way of understanding Indonesian histories through mapping, enclosing and border crossings. He tracks the movement of drugs, women and weapons, and reveals a world of smugglers, counterfeiters and hajis who evaded, avoided or ignored colonial strictures. Tagliacozzo's account is erudite and readable."Jean Gelman Taylor, author ofIndonesia: Peoples and Histories
"Secret Trades, Porous Borders offers an approach excitingly free of the disciplined narrow-mindedness that so often appears inseparable from Southeast Asian studies and area studies in general. Meticulous as it is in its details of the Dutch-Indies and British-Malaya between 1865 and 1915, the book engages its reader in thinking life-sized about the modern world."�Rudolf Mr�zek, University of Michigan, author of Engineers of Happy Land
"Taglicacozzo presents a new way of understanding Indonesian histories through mapping, enclosing and border crossings. He tracks the movement of drugs, women and weapons, and reveals a world of smugglers, counterfeiters and hajis who evaded, avoided or ignored colonial strictures. Tagliacozzo's account is erudite and readable."-Jean Gelman Taylor, author of Indonesia: Peoples and Histories
"Secret Trades, Porous Borders offers an approach excitingly free of the disciplined narrow-mindedness that so often appears inseparable from Southeast Asian studies and area studies in general. Meticulous as it is in its details of the Dutch-Indies and British-Malaya between 1865 and 1915, the book engages its reader in thinking life-sized about the modern world."-Rudolf Mr'zek, University of Michigan, author of "Engineers of Happy Land"
"Secret Trades, Porous Bordersoffersan approach excitingly free of the disciplined narrow-mindedness that so often appears inseparable from Southeast Asian studies and area studies in general. Meticulous as it is in its details of the Dutch-Indies and British-Malaya between 1865 and 1915, the book engages its reader in thinking life-sized about the modern world."Rudolf Mrazek, University of Michigan, author ofEngineers of Happy Land
" Secret Trades, Porous Bordersoffersan approach excitingly free of the disciplined narrow-mindedness that so often appears inseparable from Southeast Asian studies and area studies in general. Meticulous as it is in its details of the Dutch-Indies and British-Malaya between 1865 and 1915, the book engages its reader in thinking life-sized about the modern world."Rudolf Mrazek, University of Michigan, author of Engineers of Happy Land
"In the tradition of Fernand Braudel and Anthony Reid, Tagliacozzo understands that the navigable space between states is not only eminently worthy of its own history but is often the best way to understand state-formation. From a multitude of fugitive sources, worthy of the very smugglers he studies, Tagliacozzo brings a masterful order to the dizzying movement of commodities and people back and forth across the Sunda Straits. The patterns of history in insular Southeast Asia are best grasped from aboard ship. No better evidence exists than Tagliacozzo's daring, richly-textured, and original book."--James C. Scott, Sterling Professor of Political Science and Anthropology, Yale University
" Secret Trades, Porous Borders offers an approach excitingly free of the disciplined narrow-mindedness that so often appears inseparable from Southeast Asian studies and area studies in general. Meticulous as it is in its details of the Dutch-Indies and British-Malaya between 1865 and 1915, the book engages its reader in thinking life-sized about the modern world."-Rudolf Mr�zek, University of Michigan, author ofEngineers of Happy Land
"By tracking the construction of modern political borders and their illicit crossing by people, objects, and ideas, this superb study reveals the ambitions and anxieties that fueled colonial state building in Southeast Asia. Tagliacozzo provides us with a masterful foray into contradictions at the heart of colonial power."-Danilyn Rutherford, University of Chicago, author of Raiding the Land of the Foreigners: The Limits of the Nation on an Indonesian Frontier
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, December 2005
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Summaries
Short Annotation
Over the course of the half century from 1865 to 1915, the British and Dutch delineated colonial spheres, in the process creating new frontiers.
Description for Bookstore
During the years 1865 to 1915, the British and Dutch delineated colonial spheres and in the process created new frontiers. This book analyzes the development of these frontiers in insular Southeast Asia and inquires into the growth of vast, secret economies based on smuggling forbidden cargo (such as opium, counterfeit currency, and human beings) across the porous new borders.
Main Description
Over the course of the half century from 1865 to 1915, the British and Dutch delineated colonial spheres, in the process creating new frontiers. This book analyzes the development of these frontiers in Insular Southeast Asia as well as the accompanying smuggling activities of the opium traders, currency runners, and human traffickers who pierced such newly drawn borders with growing success. The book presents a history of the evolution of this 3000-km frontier, and then inquires into the smuggling of contraband: who smuggled and why, what routes were favored, and how effectively the British and Dutch were able to enforce their economic, moral, and political will. Examining the history of states and smugglers playing off one another within a hidden but powerful economy of forbidden cargoes, the book also offers new insights into the modern political economies of Southeast Asia.
Bowker Data Service Summary
'Secret Trades, Porous Borders' explores the gradual delineation of frontiers across insular Southeast Asia during the years of Anglo-Dutch trade rivalry in the colonial and early national period, and discusses the development of large scale smuggling operations between the different spheres of interest.
Description for Bookstore
During the years 1865 to 1915, the British and Dutch delineated colonial spheres and in the process created new frontiers. This book analyzes the development of these frontiers in Insular Southeast Asia and inquires into the growth of vast, secret economies based on smuggling forbidden cargo (opium, counterfeit currency, human beings) across porous new borders.
Table of Contents
Introductionp. 1
Mapping the frontierp. 28
Enforcing the frontierp. 53
Strengthening the frontierp. 76
The specter of violencep. 108
"Foreign Asians" on the frontierp. 128
The indigenous threatp. 160
The smuggling of narcoticsp. 186
Counterfeiters across the frontierp. 208
Illicit human cargoesp. 230
Munitions and borders : arms in contextp. 260
Praxis and evasion : arms in motionp. 290
Contraband and the junk Kim Ban Anp. 318
Worlds of illegality, 1873-99p. 339
Conclusionp. 362
Table of Contents provided by Blackwell. All Rights Reserved.

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