Catalogue


The ancient Egyptian "tale of two brothers" : a mythological, relgious, literary, and historico-political study /
Susan Tower Hollis.
edition
Second edition.
imprint
Oakville, CT : Bannerstone Press, ©2008.
description
xiii, 226 pages : illustrations ; 23 cm
ISBN
0977409422, 9780977409426
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Oakville, CT : Bannerstone Press, ©2008.
isbn
0977409422
9780977409426
contents note
1. Historical issues -- 2. The brothers -- 3. Rural Egypt -- t4. The phallus, the valley and the heart -- 5. Life in the valley -- 6. Royal Egypt -- 7. Conclusion: An Egyptian tale.
local note
ROM copy: Gift of Joe Serio; 2018.
catalogue key
11882165
 
Includes bibliographical references (pages 201-217) and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Susan Tower Hollis is a Professor at Empire State College, State University of New York, Genesee Valley Center, Rochester, NY. She holds a Ph.D. in Ancient Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations from Harvard University. She is currently at work on a book discussing the early forms and activities of the Egyptian goddesses Neith, Hathor, Nut, Isis and Nephthys, while she continues to study ancient Egyptian literature.
Reviews
Review Quotes
Will be of great interest and use to anyone interested in reading and understanding ancient Egyptian literature.'
This item was reviewed in:
Reference & Research Book News, February 2009
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Long Description
What is the meaning of this story from antiquity, so similar in form to the European folktale? The "Tale of Two Brothers" describes a rite of passage, telling the the nearly universal story of a handsome and chaste young shepherd who rejects seduction by a powerful older woman and, after many adventures, becomes king. The story of this shepherd, Bata, is intertwined with that of his brother Anubis who, deceived at first, is unceasing in his efforts to restore his brother and eventually becomes king himself. The tale also has traits peculiar to ancient Egypt, notably that the main characters are gods as well as kings. Bata and Anubis are both divine figures connected with Egypts mortuary cults, and their story is replete with religious symbols of rebirth. Using comparative analysis, the author makes a major contribution to our understanding of a story that has puzzled folklorists for almost 140 years. At the same time, she constructs a model for examining ancient narratives, neither denying their cultural context nor allowing it to impede understanding. To provide this ancient context, Susan Tower Hollis utilizes a variety of works, including literary, mythological and wisdom texts, cultic materials, historical and political works, and Egyptian paintings, reliefs and sculptures. The second edition of this classic and long out-of-print text takes into account further scholarship on the "Tale of Two Brothers" since its original publication in 1990 and contains a new, updated bibliography.
Long Description
The "Tale of Two Brothers" tells the nearly universal story of a handsome and chaste young shepherd who rejects seduction by a powerful older woman and, after many adventures, becomes king. Using comparative analysis, the author makes a major contribution to our understanding of a story that has puzzled folklorists for almost 140 years. At the same time, she constructs a model for examining ancient narratives, neither denying their cultural context nor allowing it to impede understanding. To provide this ancient context, Susan Tower Hollis utilizes a variety of works, including literary, mythological and wisdom texts, cultic materials, historical and political works, and Egyptian paintings, reliefs and sculptures.
Table of Contents
Preface to the Second Editionp. vii
Introductionp. ix
Abbreviationsp. xi
The Tale of Two Brothers - Papyrus d'Orbineyp. 1
Historical Issuesp. 11
The Beginningsp. 11
The Nineteenth-Century Search for Originsp. 13
Twentieth-Century Ancient Near Eastern Scholarsp. 17
One or Several Tales?p. 19
Twentieth-Century Ideas on Structure and Originsp. 21
Myth or Folktale? The Folklorists' Viewsp. 24
Myth or Folktale? The Egyptologists' Viewsp. 26
Authorship and Style of Compositionp. 27
The Egyptian Contextp. 29
An Allegorical Approachp. 32
Psychoanalytical Approachesp. 34
Postwar Egyptological Studiesp. 36
The Papyrus Jumilhacp. 44
The Brothersp. 47
Bata in the Ramesside Periodp. 47
Biconsonantal Names commonly related to Batap. 51
Contexts of the Ramesside Examplesp. 54
Contexts of the Biconsonantal Names related to Batap. 58
Anubis: His Home and Relationshipsp. 71
Anubis, the Ancient Mortuary Godp. 74
The Mortuary Role of Anubisp. 79
The Negative Aspects of Anubisp. 85
Rural Egyptp. 89
The Brothers at Homep. 89
Attempted Seductionp. 94
Reactions of the Brothersp. 99
Bata confronts Anubisp. 100
The Separation of the Brothersp. 102
Excursus I - The Papyrus d'Orbiney and Genesis 39p. 105
The Phallus, the Valley and the Heartp. 113
Bata's Phallusp. 113
Osiris' Phallusp. 116
The n$$r-Fishp. 120
The Effect of Bata's Self-Emasculationp. 124
The Valley of the $$ ¿ and its Significancep. 126
Bata's Heart and Egyptian Beliefs about the Heartp. 131
Bata's Heart on the Treep. 138
The Secret of the Heartp. 140
Excursus II - Osiris in Byblosp. 143
Life in the Valleyp. 147
Bata as Hunterp. 147
Bata, Bull of the Enneadp. 149
Bata's Wifep. 151
p3 ymp. 157
Royal Egyptp. 161
Bata's Wife goes to Egyptp. 161
Bata's Death and Anubi's Searchp. 165
Bata as Bull: Life and Deathp. 168
Bata as Perseap. 172
Kamutefp. 175
Bata's Birthp. 179
Accessionp. 186
Conclusion: An Egyptian Talep. 187
Appendix - Selections from the Papyrus Jumilhacp. 195
Bibliographyp. 201
Indexp. 219
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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