Catalogue


Transatlantic radicals and the early American Republic /
Michael Durey.
imprint
Lawrence : University Press of Kansas, 1997.
description
xi, 425 p.
ISBN
0700608230 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Lawrence : University Press of Kansas, 1997.
isbn
0700608230 (alk. paper)
catalogue key
1183525
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 1997-12:
More than 200 radicals from England, Scotland, and Ireland, who looked to Paine and Jefferson for inspiration, came to America in the 1790s. Many became participants in the political discourse of the early Republic and took up leadership positions within Jefferson's Republican Party. They helped bring Jefferson victory in 1800; many then left the party as Jefferson moderated his views and the emigres lost influence. Durey provides, for the first time, a collective biography that is a full-scale analysis of the roots of these immigrant radicals. He explains their reasons for migrating and their successes, or lack thereof, in their adopted country, and demonstrates their tremendous impact, as a group, on the political thought of the new nation. Additionally, Durey illuminates the intellectual and political history of the Atlantic world and helps to frame American radical political thought within a wider perspective. Although the cavalcade of names sometimes becomes daunting, the author does an admirable job of sketching a group portrait at the same time that he describes the individual radicals and their ideas. Recommended for upper-division undergraduates and above. G. W. Franz; Pennsylvania State University, Delaware County Campus
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This item was reviewed in:
Choice, December 1997
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Summaries
Main Description
In the transatlantic world of the late eighteenth century, easterly winds blew radical thought to America. Thomas Paine had already arrived on these shores in 1774 and made his mark as a radical pamphleteer during the Revolution. In his wake followed more than 200 other radical exiles-English Dissenters, Whigs, and Painites; Scottish "lads oparts"; and Irish patriots-who became influential newspaper writers and editors and helped change the nature of political discourse in a young nation. Michael Durey has written the first full-scale analysis of these radicals, evaluating the long-term influence their ideas have had on American political thought. Radicals in Exile uncovers the roots of their radicalism in the Old World and tells the story of how these men came to be exiled, how they emigrated, and how they participated in the politics of their adopted country. Nearly all of these radicals looked to Paine as their spiritual leader and to Thomas Jefferson as their political champion. They held egalitarian, anti-federalist values and promoted an extreme form of participatory democracy that found a niche in the radical wing of Jeffersons Republican Party. Their divided views on slavery, however, reveal that democratic republicanism was unable to cope with the realities of that institution. As political activists during the 1790s, they proved crucial to Jeffersons 1800 presidential victory; then, after his views moderated and their influence waned, many repatriated, others drifted into anonymity, and a few managed to find success in the New World. Although many of these men are known to us through other histories, their influence as a group has never before been so closely examined. Durey persuasively demonstrates that the intellectual ferment in Britain did indeed have tremendous influence on American politics. His account of that influence sheds considerable light on transatlantic political history and differences in religious, political, and economic freedoms. Skillfully balancing a large cast of characters, Radicals in Exile depicts the diversity of their experiences and shows how crucial these reluctant emigres were to shaping our republic in its formative years.
Unpaid Annotation
In the transatlantic world of the late eighteenth century, easterly winds blew radical thought to America.Thomas Paine had already arrived on these shores in 1774 and made his mark as a radical pamphleteer during the Revolution. In his wake followed more than 200 other radical exiles -- English Dissenters, Whigs, and Painites; Scottish "lads o'parts"; and Irish patriots -- who became influential newspaper writers and editors and helped change the nature of political discourse in a young nation.Michael Durey has written the first full-scale analysis of these radicals, evaluating the long-term influence their ideas have had on American political thought. Transatlantic Radicals uncovers the roots of their radicalism in the Old World and tells the story of how these men came to be exiled, how they emigrated, and how they participated in the politics of their adopted country.Nearly all of these radicals looked to Paine as their spiritual leader and to Thomas Jefferson as their political champion. They held egalitarian, anti-federalist values and promoted an extreme form of participatory democracy that found a niche in the radical wing of Jefferson's Republican Party. Their divided views on slavery, however, reveal that democratic republicanism was unable to cope with the realities of that institution.As political activists during the 1790s, they proved crucial to Jefferson's 1800 presidential victory; then, after his views moderated and their influence waned, many repatriated, others drifted into anonymity, and a few managed to find success in the New World.Although many of these men are known to us through other histories, their influence as a group has never before been soclosely examined. Durey persuasively demonstrates that the intellectual ferment in Britain did indeed have tremendous influence on American politics. His account of that influence sheds considerable light on transatlantic pol
Table of Contents
Preface
Introductionp. 1
English Radicalsp. 12
Scottish Radicalsp. 50
Irish Radicalsp. 80
Into Exilep. 134
Land of Opportunity?p. 174
Defending the Republic, 1793-1801p. 221
Reforming the Republicp. 258
Conclusionp. 289
Appendixp. 295
Abbreviations in Notesp. 297
Notesp. 299
Bibliographyp. 373
Indexp. 405
Table of Contents provided by Blackwell. All Rights Reserved.

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