Catalogue

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The price of the ticket [electronic resource] : Barack Obama and the rise and decline of Black politics /
Fredrick C. Harris.
imprint
New York : Oxford University Press, c2012.
description
xviii, 210 p. : ill. ; 25 cm.
ISBN
0199739676 (hardback : alk. paper), 9780199739677 (hardback : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
More Details
imprint
New York : Oxford University Press, c2012.
isbn
0199739676 (hardback : alk. paper)
9780199739677 (hardback : alk. paper)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
contents note
Clash of ideas -- Chicago, political capital of Black America -- Entering the promise land -- Respectability as public philosophy -- Wink, nod, vote -- Price of the ticket.
catalogue key
11810197
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [193]-204) and index.
A Look Inside
Awards
This item was nominated for the following awards:
Hurston/Wright Legacy Award, USA, 2013 : Nominated
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Publishers Weekly on 2012-04-16:
In the latest from the series Trangressing Boundaries: Studies in Black Politics and Black Communities, Columbia University political scientist Harris (Something Within and Countervailing Forces in African-American Civic Activism) argues that unintended consequences of the "race-neutral" strategies used in Obama's 2008 presidential campaign and his presidency "have actually marginalized rather than elevated race-specific issues on the national political agenda." Harris is a vivid storyteller, bringing to life the men and women responsible for the rise of black politics in the 20th century. He doesn't shy away from juicy foibles of character, although his focus is on ideological conflict, with debate between several issues: politics of accommodation and politics of confrontation; Chicago's machine politicians and those who fought against it; independent and coalition politics; and the prosperity gospel and black libertarian theology in Church teachings. W.E.B. Du Bois's famous call for the Talented Tenth to "guide the Mass away from the contamination and the death of the Worst" has taken root over time, Harris argues, to create "a public philosophy directed at policing the black poor." The struggle against the "persistence of racial inequality... will be dominated by triumphant narratives extolling Barack Obama," Harris fears, believing that "the price has not yet proven its worth in sacrifice." This is an enlightening, readable, important, and deeply worrying book. (June) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.
Reviews
Review Quotes
"Harris is a vivid storyteller, bringing to life the men and women responsible for the rise of black politics in the 20th century. He doesn't shy away from juicy foibles of character, although his focus is on ideological conflict . . . This is an enlightening, readable, important, and deeply worrying book." --Publishers Weekly
"Harris is a vivid storyteller, bringing to life the men and women responsible for the rise of black politics in the 20th century. He doesn't shy away from juicy foibles of character, although his focus is on ideological conflict . . . This is an enlightening, readable, important, and deeply worrying book." --Publishers Weekly "The Price of the Ticketis a bold intervention in contemporary American politics. Harris provides evidence for our intuitions: that, even with an African American president (perhaps because of that fact) black folk languish in the shadows of 21st century America. With his use of history and his courage to look the facts squarely in the face, Harris has offered us a wake-up call. Of course, the question is will we listen and act." -- Eddie S. Glaude, Jr., William S. Tod Professor of Religion and African American Studies, Princeton University "With its expert attention to the intersections of black politics and history, and the workings of American democracy,The Price of the Ticketwill quickly become the gold standard for studies of the Obama presidency through the lens of race. Fredrick Harris has produced the book for those looking for a sober, intelligent, and informed, analysis of the racial implications of the current regime." -- Richard Iton, Professor of African American Studies, Northwestern University and author ofIn Search of the Black Fantastic "The Price of the Ticketis an insightful, probing look at the Obama Presidency and Race. Harris deftly shows that while the election of the first Black President was a watershed moment for America, that same moment marked the end of political coalitions and grass roots activism within the African American community. The price of the ticket has been a hefty one indeed, and Fred Harris deftly shows just how much the ticket President Obama cashed has cost Black America." -- Anthea Butler, Associate Professor of Religious Studies and Graduate Chair of Religion, The University of Pennsylvania
This item was reviewed in:
Publishers Weekly, April 2012
Washington Post, September 2012
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
In this book, Fred Harris contends that Obama's success has, in reality, exacted a negative price. His victory has not only utterly transformed the forms of black politics that emerged in the 1960s and which laid the foundation for his eventual ascendance, Harris claims - it has profoundly weakened them.
Long Description
The historical significance of Barack Obama's triumph in the presidential election of 2008 scarcely requires comment. Yet it contains an irony: he won a victory as an African American only by denying that he was the candidate of African Americans. Obama's very success, writes Fredrick Harris, exacted a heavy cost on black politics. In The Price of the Ticket, Harris puts Obama's career in the context of decades of black activism, showing how his election undermined the very movement that made it possible. The path to his presidency began just before passage of the 1965 Voting Rights Act, when black leaders began to discuss strategies to make the most of their new access to the ballot. Some argued that black voters should organize into a cohesive, independent bloc; others urged a more race-neutral approach,working together with other racial minorities as well as like-minded whites. This has been the fundamental divide within black politics ever since. At first, the gap did not seem serious. But the post-civil-rights era has accelerated a shift towards race-neutral politics. Obama made a point of distancing himselffrom older race-conscious black leaders, such as Al Sharpton and Jesse Jackson--even though, as Harris shows, he owes much to Jackson's earlier campaigns for the White House. Unquestionably Obama's approach won support among whites, but Harris finds the results troublesome. The social problems targeted by an earlier generation of black politicians--racial disparities in income and education, stratospheric incarceration and unemployment rates, rampant HIV in black communities--all persist, yetObama's election, ironically, marginalized them. Meanwhile, the civil-rights movement's militancy is fading from memory. Written by one of America's leading scholars of race and politics, The Price of the Ticket will reshape our understanding of the rise of Barack Obama and the decline of a politics dedicated to challenging racial inequality head on.
Main Description
The historical significance of Barack Obama's triumph in the presidential election of 2008 scarcely requires comment. Yet it contains an irony: he won a victory as an African American only by denying that he was the candidate of African Americans. Obama's very success, writes Fredrick Harris, exacted a heavy cost on black politics. In The Price of the Ticket, Harris puts Obama's career in the context of decades of black activism, showing how his election undermined the very movement that made it possible. The path to his presidency began just before passage of the 1965 Voting Rights Act, when black leaders began to discuss strategies to make the most of their new access to the ballot. Some argued that black voters should organize into a cohesive, independent bloc; others urged a more race-neutral approach, working together with other racial minorities as well as like-minded whites. This has been the fundamental divide within black politics ever since. At first, the gap didnot seem serious. But the post-civil-rights era has accelerated a shift towards race-neutral politics. Obama made a point of distancing himself from older race-conscious black leaders, such as Al Sharpton and Jesse Jackson - even though, as Harris shows, he owes much to Jackson's earlier campaigns for the White House. Unquestionably Obama's approach won support among whites, but Harris finds the results troublesome. The social problems targeted by an earlier generation of black politicians - racial disparities in income and education, stratospheric incarceration and unemployment rates, rampant HIV in black communities - all persist, yet Obama's election, ironically, marginalized them. Meanwhile, the civil-rights movement's militancy is fading from memory. Written by one of America's leading scholars of race and politics, The Price of the Ticket will reshape our understanding of the rise of Barack Obama and the decline of a politics dedicated to challenging racial inequality headon.
Main Description
The historical significance of Barack Obama's triumph in the presidential election of 2008 scarcely requires comment. Yet it contains an irony: he won a victory as an African American only by denying that he was the candidate of African Americans. Obama's very success, writes Fredrick Harris,exacted a heavy cost on black politics. In The Price of the Ticket, Harris puts Obama's career in the context of decades of black activism, showing how his election undermined the very movement that made it possible. The path to his presidency began just before passage of the 1965 Voting Rights Act, when black leaders began to discussstrategies to make the most of their new access to the ballot. Some argued that black voters should organize into a cohesive, independent bloc; others urged a more race-neutral approach, working together with other racial minorities as well as like-minded whites. This has been the fundamental dividewithin black politics ever since. At first, the gap did not seem serious. But the post-civil-rights era has accelerated a shift towards race-neutral politics. Obama made a point of distancing himself from older race-conscious black leaders, such as Al Sharpton and Jesse Jackson - even though, asHarris shows, he owes much to Jackson's earlier campaigns for the White House. Unquestionably Obama's approach won support among whites, but Harris finds the results troublesome. The social problems targeted by an earlier generation of black politicians - racial disparities in income and education,stratospheric incarceration and unemployment rates, rampant HIV in black communities - all persist, yet Obama's election, ironically, marginalized them. Meanwhile, the civil-rights movement's militancy is fading from memory. Written by one of America's leading scholars of race and politics, The Price of the Ticket will reshape our understanding of the rise of Barack Obama and the decline of a politics dedicated to challenging racial inequality head on.
Main Description
The historical significance of Barack Obama's triumph in the presidential election of 2008 scarcely requires comment. Yet it contains an irony: he won a victory as an African American only by denying that he was the candidateofAfrican Americans. Obama's very success, writes Fredrick Harris, exacted a heavy cost on black politics. InThe Price of the Ticket, Harris puts Obama's career in the context of decades of black activism, showing how his election undermined the very movement that made it possible. The path to his presidency began just before passage of the 1965 Voting Rights Act, when black leaders began to discuss strategies to make the most of their new access to the ballot. Some argued that black voters should organize into a cohesive, independent bloc; others urged a more race-neutral approach, working together with other racial minorities as well as like-minded whites. This has been the fundamental divide within black politics ever since. At first, the gap did not seem serious. But the post-civil-rights era has accelerated a shift towards race-neutral politics. Obama made a point of distancing himself from older race-conscious black leaders, such as Al Sharpton and Jesse Jackson--even though, as Harris shows, he owes much to Jackson's earlier campaigns for the White House. Unquestionably Obama's approach won support among whites, but Harris finds the results troublesome. The social problems targeted by an earlier generation of black politicians--racial disparities in income and education, stratospheric incarceration and unemployment rates, rampant HIV in black communities--all persist, yet Obama's election, ironically, marginalized them. Meanwhile, the civil-rights movement's militancy is fading from memory. Written by one of America's leading scholars of race and politics,The Price of the Ticketwill reshape our understanding of the rise of Barack Obama and the decline of a politics dedicated to challenging racial inequality head on.
Table of Contents
Preface
A Clash of Visions
Chicago, The Political Capital of Black America
Entering the Land of Milk and Honey
Respectability as Public Philosophy
Winks, Nods, and Votes
Price of the Ticket
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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